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Thread: Intimidated By On Point

  1. #1
    Super Member Boston1954's Avatar
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    Intimidated By On Point

    I have seen so many beautiful things here and at quilt shows, that are placed on point. I am so afraid I'd mess it up that I don't even try. Is there an easy way for someone (started in 1992) who sometimes still feels like a beginner?
    Life is not a movie. No one is going to yell "CUT" when you make a mistake. - Anne L. Fulton

    Life is 10 percent what happens to you, and 90 percent what you do about it. - Steve Harvey

  2. #2
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    Setting on point is not so hard. Just tilt your head and you will see your blocks are just rows getting longer and then shorter with triangles finishing each row. Bonnie hunter has a chart that gives measurements to cut your triangles. I have faith in you. Just give it a try

  3. #3
    Super Member ube quilting's Avatar
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    It is still straight line quilting. Find a simple on point pattern that you like and do a few sample blocks to learn how to do the setting triangles. It is not hard. Read, read, read the directions and follow them. Once you make your first you will love making more. Be fearless! Try a wall hanging as a starter project.
    You have to take that first step.
    peace
    no act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted. Aesop

  4. #4
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    I agree with cjsews. I thought setting pieces on point would be hard ... until I tried it. I used a pattern for my first attempt. That way, I had instructions to follow. It wasn't hard at all, and now I feel confident setting blocks on point in my own designs. The only tricky part when you do it yourself is knowing the size of the setting triangles. But Bonnie Hunter offers all the help you'll need.

    Good luck! Enjoy the process!
    As much as I hate it, my seam ripper is my best friend.

  5. #5
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    I agree. It's really all straight lines. The trick is to cut the setting triangles so that the straight of grain is on the edge of the quilt so it doesn't get all wonky. As mentioned, Bonnie Hunter has all the math:
    http://quiltville.com/onpointmath.shtml

    I usually cut them a bit bigger. Attach them to the row, then trim.
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

  6. #6
    Super Member sewingsuz's Avatar
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    I usually cut them a little bigger also. try it, it is not hard at all.
    Suzanne
    Asking a seamstress to mend is like asking Picasso to paint your garage.

  7. #7
    Senior Member AVFD215's Avatar
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    Just Do It. Start with a small 24 inch by 24 inch. Not much fabric invested, use scraps if you can.
    You will be pleasantly surprised.

  8. #8
    Super Member quiltingshorttimer's Avatar
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    I hear your concern, Boston--was there myself. I find if I take my time laying the blocks out on design wall (extra bed) it really helps. I also invested (that is what it felt like!) a 22" sq ruler that I use making t-shirt quilts, but also wanted because it has a scale on it for cutting the setting triangles and corner triangles without me having to do math. But there are many charts out there that help with that too. I say go for it! It's such a simple way to get a much different looking quilt.

  9. #9
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
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    setting on point is really not difficult. If its the bias in the setting triangle you worry about I find starching bias really makes it easier to handle
    Brother XL-3500i, SQ-9050, Dreamweaver XE6200D, Juki MO-2000QVP

  10. #10
    Super Member madamekelly's Avatar
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    my first on point setting was a "just wing it" and it turned out ok. I have been making quilts many years but because I have health issues, I will probably never call myself a real quilter. If I can make it work, I know you can. Start small is my only advice. Mine was a queen, and also my first queen quilt. Like I said, if I can, you can. I believe in you.
    If you always do, what you have always done, The results never change. Change is the wings you give yourself.

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