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Thread: Lap quilts for nursing home residents

  1. #21
    Senior Member mermaid's Avatar
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    Just a suggestion for quick little quilts--a panel with strips around 4 sides to the size needed. I've been making the small quilts for my local nursing home for quite a while. They are so appreciated...but...even more so are the wheelchair bags & walker bags. The residents want storage for their own things and to keep their belongings close. A nh employee told me the bags were special, and I try to make all the gifts special with embroidered cute sayings and designs. I put pockets for their glasses, and cell phones--yep, many of them have their own phones! She told me once that some residents have laptops and welcome the storage bags for their wheel chairs. But as "Neesie" said, I was told to make the wheelchair quilts a little smaller--like 36 x 36 or not much bigger. For bed throws or wraparounds, they can be larger. Today I discussed ''what else is needed'' with the administrator. Know what she said? Maybe I could give some time to help teach some of them some quilting basics! So they can have hobbies with purpose. You know, many of us will be there one of these days.

  2. #22
    Super Member barri1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neesie View Post
    I'm a bit puzzled, by this. When my FIL was wheelchair-bound, the nursing home advised against anything too long, as it could get caught in the wheels.
    Now that you mention the length, and wheelchair sizes, can you give me a hint on what would be appropriate. I have two month, and this is something that I would like to help with. It's sort of like a RAK, but in Jewish it's called a Chesed project. Since this week is the Jewish New Year, the commitment is more important.

  3. #23
    Super Member Gramie bj's Avatar
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    Before you add ties to your quilts, check with your local Nursing homes. In Washington state you can not restrain any one in any way. This includes using tied clothing protecters at meal time. I think tying quilts to wheel chairs or on the person might fall into the same area. Best check first if it can be done and how.

  4. #24
    Super Member deedum's Avatar
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    thanks for posting this. I had planned on making some lapquilts and such for the nursing home, but when do we find or make the time? So this day going forward my challenge to myself is to get a couple made before Christmas. Maybe it will bring a smile to some of the residents. The fleece shoulders covers won't take much to make either. I may get started this weekend even. I make blankets and burp cloths for daycare and crisis centers in our area. This will give me a chance to branch out and give to others! Lucky, I got stash!

  5. #25
    Super Member carolaug's Avatar
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    What a great idea...I have two nursing homes in my town...I think I will do the same. Thanks for the idea...winters are cold here.

  6. #26
    Super Member QuiltnLady1's Avatar
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    For wheel chair lap quilts -- I find 36x30 to work -- and either round the corners to do a diagonal cut so they stay oout of the wheels (mostly).
    QuiltnLady1

    When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.

  7. #27
    Super Member Neesie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gramie bj View Post
    Before you add ties to your quilts, check with your local Nursing homes. In Washington state you can not restrain any one in any way. This includes using tied clothing protecters at meal time. I think tying quilts to wheel chairs or on the person might fall into the same area. Best check first if it can be done and how.
    Maybe a large button and strap, with several buttonholes, could be used (on each side of cover). Then it could be adjusted and easily removed. Well, I guess the best solution, would be to just line it with something non-slippery - flannel, fleece, or corduroy, maybe.
    Neesie


    By all means let's be open-minded, but not so open-minded that our brains drop out.
    ~Richard Dawkins

  8. #28
    Super Member
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    Thanks for the links for great projects to keep us warm
    http://www.oregonquilting.net
    I choose to give my life away for things that last forever

  9. #29
    Super Member barri1's Avatar
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    Okay, So I checked what I have in the house, and I have tons of scraps. I have flannel that I cut from shirts. I bought good quality brands at the thrift stores, and couldn't bare throwing them out. I think the men would love them. I also have the pockets. Sooooo. I need you to let us know how many you need in mens, vs. womens, and what size.

  10. #30
    Super Member Daylesewblessed's Avatar
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    On the subject of teaching quilting to nursing home residents:

    Once/month I bring a batch of prepped fleece blankets for Project Linus to an assisted living center for a work session. The residents do the "braided loop edge" on blankets that I have gotten ready for them. All they have to do is a simple finger crochet of the loops all around the blanket. This is an assisted living facility, not a nursing home. Even so, many of the residents are unable to do the work either because their fingers won't cooperate or they no longer have the cognitive ability.

    Those who can do it love it! Some who cannot do it just sit and enjoy the session. Everyone seems to enjoy my "entertainment" as I tell them about my latest quilt projects and frequently bring "show and tell." I also inform them about the activities of our local Project Linus chapter. The important thing here is that ladies who for decades have given to their communities have an opportunity to continue by making something for children in need. That makes them feel useful.

    The ladies would love to have sessions more frequently, but I am limited in the resources of time for prepping the fleece and money for purchasing it. As it is, we complete at least 15 blankets/month.

    I urge anyone who is interested in leading any classes or work sessions in residential facilities to give it a try -- I find it to be very rewarding. The activities director would be the one to coordinate with.

    Dayle

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