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Thread: More than one way - - - -

  1. #11
    Power Poster RedGarnet222's Avatar
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    Oh I know!! But, what about that person whom you have never met, that keeps talking to you when you are trying to be attentive to the teacher. Oooo that just is the rub to end all rubs. Because I have gotten the ugly looks from the teacher for it! Who me?? It wasn't me, I was just sitting here minding my own business.

    Or ... How about a student that keeps asking you to school her on something when you are trying to sew. There should be a set of rules on the walls.
    Last edited by RedGarnet222; 04-19-2012 at 04:06 PM.
    RedGarnet222

    "Take your needle, my child, and work at your pattern ... It will come out a rose by and by. Life is like that ...one stitch at a time, taken patiently."
    *Oliver Wendell Holms

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedGarnet222 View Post
    Oh I know!! But, what about that person whom you have never met, that keeps talking to you when you are trying to be attentive to the teacher. Oooo that just is the rub to end all rubs. Because I have gotten the ugly looks from the teacher for it! Who me?? It wasn't me, I was just sitting here minding my own business.

    Or ... How about a student that keeps asking you to school her on something when you are trying to sew. There should be a set of rules on the walls.
    I had that person sitting beside me, too. GRRRR

  3. #13
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray View Post
    We've heard - over and over - that there is usually more than one way to do many things.

    And I agree.

    But why get upset if an instructor only demonstrates one way of accomplishing something?

    Most classes have time constraints on them.

    Sometimes it's a challenge to just get one idea across - forget about variations on a theme.

    I would think it would be easier to try to keep a group "on track" if most of the members are doing the same thing more-or-less the same way at the same time.

    I read over and over about "poor teachers/instructors" - but the student/learner/tutee has to do his/her part, also, to make a class successful or a learning experience positive.

    (I'm not an instructor - but I have had some obnoxious/disruptive/unprepared classmates now and then)
    Thank you!! As an instructor, I DO thank you!
    Yes, I do know about the other ways, but have chosen, for whatever reason, for THIS class, not to use/teach/demonstrate them. It does not make me dumb/poor/unskilled/or inexperienced, just selective/time-crunched/and assessing of the personality of the current class.
    YOU would be a favorite pupil in my class! (Though I would hope the others never realized it)

    Jan in VA
    Jan in VA
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  4. #14
    Senior Member AudreyB's Avatar
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    As both a student and an instructor, I agree. It is not only disruptive but it also uses a lot of valuable class time.
    AudreyB
    Those who sleep under quilts are covered with love.

  5. #15
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    This is why I don't take classes!

    I am doing a BOM at the local quilt shop and I detest the part where the instructor reads the directions, explains it and the talkers ask her the same thing over and over.....And I am a big talker. I just know when to shut up.

    I did join this club to step outside of my box. I have learned that I can't join in a group like this very often. It is WAY to stressful and I hate having someone tell me I HAVE to do it their way.

  6. #16
    Junior Member Joanne9of12's Avatar
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    This topic has come up at a perfect time! I just finished the second session of a multi-part class (we'll meet four times) in which two students just don't want to follow instructions and they often offer suggestions (rather loudly) to the other students on ways to "piece this better and easier, and with no pins." As an instructor, I try to emphasize that there are different ways to achieve the same results, but this is what works for me and why. I have no problem with students wanting to do it "their way", but I remind them that all instructions, (cutting, piecing, pressing, etc.) are for my way, and that they may have to make adjustments in fabric requirements, etc.

    When I prepare for a class, I often try the other techniques to familiarize myself with them and be prepared to explain why the way I do it works best for me. (Sometimes it's a grain issue, an accuracy thing, or just my preferred method.) I tell my students that I have tried various techniques and this is what works best for me on this particuar project, and ask that they at least TRY my way. If it doesn't work for them, fine. Change to whatever works for them, but again I remind them that they may need to make changes in the cutting, piecing and pressing.

    Usually at this point if someone wants to follow their own path, they ask for help in figuring out the adjustments. To me, that is not fair to the other students so I tell them that I will help them as best I can during a break, at lunch or after class. Sometimes that results in upset students, but I try to suggest that they move to another section of the project until we have a chance to figure out what they need.

    For the two "disruptive" students I mentioned above, I spoke with them after class and said that since there are a number of rather new quilters in the class, their suggestions have been a bit confusing to other students. I suggested that we meet before the next class and evaluate their method so I can better familiarize myself with what they are doing and see if I can work it into future classes. I suggested that perhaps their higher skill levels are the reason they are having succeess with their technique and that perhaps other students just "aren't there yet." They agreed and I have hope that will solve my problem. Was that diplomatic enough? :-)

  7. #17
    Senior Member newbiequilter's Avatar
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    My little peeves are: people who arrive late for class and don't even have their fabrics cut per the pre-class instructions; people who know it all; people who talk during the instructions; and there are others but some of the aforementioned "people" are the same people all rolled into one! I took an art quilt class from an instructor who is great and knows her stuff and has done extensive research. One of the "students" (and I use the term VERY loosely!) said "I am a graphic artist and that is not the way to do that process....!) The rest of us were very glad when that person did not come back for the other two of three classes! *****Sigh of relief*****

  8. #18
    Senior Member newbiequilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joanne9of12 View Post
    This topic has come up at a perfect time! I just finished the second session of a multi-part class (we'll meet four times) in which two students just don't want to follow instructions and they often offer suggestions (rather loudly) to the other students on ways to "piece this better and easier, and with no pins." As an instructor, I try to emphasize that there are different ways to achieve the same results, but this is what works for me and why. I have no problem with students wanting to do it "their way", but I remind them that all instructions, (cutting, piecing, pressing, etc.) are for my way, and that they may have to make adjustments in fabric requirements, etc.

    When I prepare for a class, I often try the other techniques to familiarize myself with them and be prepared to explain why the way I do it works best for me. (Sometimes it's a grain issue, an accuracy thing, or just my preferred method.) I tell my students that I have tried various techniques and this is what works best for me on this particuar project, and ask that they at least TRY my way. If it doesn't work for them, fine. Change to whatever works for them, but again I remind them that they may need to make changes in the cutting, piecing and pressing.

    Usually at this point if someone wants to follow their own path, they ask for help in figuring out the adjustments. To me, that is not fair to the other students so I tell them that I will help them as best I can during a break, at lunch or after class. Sometimes that results in upset students, but I try to suggest that they move to another section of the project until we have a chance to figure out what they need.

    For the two "disruptive" students I mentioned above, I spoke with them after class and said that since there are a number of rather new quilters in the class, their suggestions have been a bit confusing to other students. I suggested that we meet before the next class and evaluate their method so I can better familiarize myself with what they are doing and see if I can work it into future classes. I suggested that perhaps their higher skill levels are the reason they are having succeess with their technique and that perhaps other students just "aren't there yet." They agreed and I have hope that will solve my problem. Was that diplomatic enough? :-)
    WOW - you should be with the United Nations. Very diplomatic and I hope they get "the picture"

  9. #19
    Super Member wordpaintervs's Avatar
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    I agree too....no sense in disruptive behavior. If you want to say a different way, do it on your own time or become an instructor~
    "Greater is He that is in me, then he that is in the world"

    www.dollsforverysickkids.com

  10. #20
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    "Or ... How about a student that keeps asking you to school her on something when you are trying to sew. There should be a set of rules on the walls."

    I work with a pretty diverse group of folks (by which I mean that we are from a variety of countries and cultures) and in meetings for projects we DO put the rules up on the wall! Why not for quilting classes? The rules arepretty basic 'no sidebar conversations' 'no off topic discussions' 'never provide negative comments', pretty much the kindergarten stuff.
    But itmakes sure that we are all coming from the same point of understanding. Something just as basic would work for class.

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