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Thread: Questions about working with fleece---

  1. #1
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    I am making lap quilts for the nursing home and want to use fleece blankets for the backing. I want them to be warm as I know that many oldsters are frequently cold. Should I use batting or flannel in the middle so they will be warmer? Does the fleece really stretch as badly as I've been reading? How should stitches be adjusted to accomodate the stretch? Any other help will be greatly appreciated. Thanks. Marge L.

  2. #2
    Super Member oatw13's Avatar
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    I would try making a small one with a light batting so you can see how heavy it is. The fleece can make it heavier.

    I have found if I spray baste the fleece and just do straight line quilting, I don't have any issues quilting it on my home machine. If you do FMW, just make sure you lower the feed dogs. (And maybe put the fleece side on top.) The spray also helps to keep it from stretching.

    I don't adjust my stitches at all.

    Oh, some fleece has more stretch than others, so stretch it both directions before you buy. I would buy a heavier fleece with less stretch.

    Good luck :)

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by oatw13
    I would try making a small one with a light batting so you can see how heavy it is. The fleece can make it heavier.

    I have found if I spray baste the fleece and just do straight line quilting, I don't have any issues quilting it on my home machine. If you do FMW, just make sure you lower the feed dogs. (And maybe put the fleece side on top.) The spray also helps to keep it from stretching.

    I don't adjust my stitches at all.


    otw13----You answered all of my questions and thank you. I did forget to ask about the spray basting & glad you mentioned it. The fleece comes from a thin fleece blanket I had and never used, so thought I'd use it for these. Thanks again. Marge L.
    Oh, some fleece has more stretch than others, so stretch it both directions before you buy. I would buy a heavier fleece with less stretch.

    Good luck :)

  4. #4
    Super Member TonnieLoree's Avatar
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    I would not use additional batting. The extra weight from that could make it hard for some to snuggle up with. Remember, when dressing for the cold, use layers. Several thinner layers of clothing works better than one bulky layer.

    When you are sewing your top to the fleece, the fleece should be on bottom to allow the dogs to take up the slack. Fleece is forgiving and, I would not quilt these either. Use yarn or embroidery floss to tie at 6" intervals.

    Your efforts are admirable, but remember, that unless you have an unlimited budget, many of these blankets will be lost, stolen or "misplaced". Do not spend your hours working on a project for "that dear person", because it is sad, but likely that it will become a ward of the facility anyhow.

  5. #5
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    No batting. Can't handle extra weight. Ty for doing this!

  6. #6
    Super Member bookworm's Avatar
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    When I back with fleece I do less quilting and it turns out better. For example one smaller quilt I sewed owl designs in the corners and center. Ended up with the back staying flat.

  7. #7
    Senior Member neeng's Avatar
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    The last couple of quilts I did were backed with fleece. I debated about using batting or not, and ended up without. I think they're just the right weight without it.

    I spray-basted and had no issues with the quilting. I just used a fairly large quilting pattern all over to begin with, then filled in the areas where I wanted heavier quilting.

    While fleece does stretch, it's also quite forgiving, and as TonnieLoree said, if you put the fleece on the bottom when doing the base allover pattern, the feeddogs work it in nicely without wrinkles.

  8. #8
    Super Member bibliostone's Avatar
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    I just finished three baby quilts with fleece as backing and I used a thin polyester batting (you know, the kind everyone says not to use)and they came out great. The two I did on my home machine, I quilted with the fleece on top to keep it from bunching up. I used a combination of loops and echo quilting. A slightly larger one (about 45 in. square)I did on a long-arm machine as a practice piece. On that one, the fleece was on the bottom and it came out fine. The quilting was loopy with heart/leaves and the quilt is not stiff at all.

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