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Thread: Sewing in a cold basement, HELP!

  1. #71
    Senior Member
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    Nov 2010
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    SoCal
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    I had the same problem when I had my computer near the front windows. I took a lap quilt, folded it in half. and put it around my shoulders. I was thinking of attaching a strap of some kind to each side to put my arms through so it would not slip off, but it was warm! I ended up moving the desk, and didn't need it then.

  2. #72
    Junior Member nlpakk's Avatar
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    Apr 2011
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    Fingerlakes area, NYS
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    Quote Originally Posted by phranny View Post
    I've spent the past month sprucing up the basement so I could have a place to "spread out" and be creative. Today I finished doing alterations on the last wedding dress I will ever do, and my treat was to go downstairs and sew! After two hours into the evening, my neck is stiff, and I feel a coldness in my back. If I am going to enjoy this little hideway, I am going to need an alternate heat source! What kind of portable heater should I be looking for? There is no place for a woodfired stove ( would love one).The gas furnace heats the upstairs, and I get a trickle of heat in my new room.

    Anyone else sew downstairs where it's cool? What do you use?
    I sew out in my husband's shop as we live in a smaller, older mobile home and there is no room for my sewing. The heat is in the floor which helps and my feet are warm but my hands get cold so I have been using a small electric cube heater and I put it on the desk near me but of course you have to be careful and keep it away from your fabric so that's not really the best option. My other alternate heat source is an oil filled electric heater which works wonderful and I probably use that more now. Good luck!

  3. #73
    Super Member sewingsuz's Avatar
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    Nov 2010
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    Arizona
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    I have the Presto Heat Dish heater from Costco and i really like it.
    Suzanne
    Asking a seamstress to mend is like asking Picasso to paint your garage.

  4. #74
    Super Member
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    Mar 2011
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    Mechanicsville, IA
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    We have an efficiency apartment built into the farm shop for our 21 year old grandson. We purchased an Eden Pure heater and have been very pleased with it. We ordered it online and were so pleased with the company we eventually bought 2 air purifiers from them. They are recommended by Bob Villa, the home repair guy from TV. www.edenpure.com
    Cheryl Robinson
    http://www.silverneedlestitching.com
    APQS Millenium Longarm with Intelliquilter

  5. #75
    Senior Member ThreadHead's Avatar
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    Mar 2011
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    Org. Texas now Florida
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    I took a piece of heavy wool material about 2 .5 foot long, 16 inches wide, folded almost in half, making the back a little longer than the front, cutting a hole the fold so I could slip it over my head and made a dickie. I have two of them and wear them under my clothes to keep warm. This keeps my chest and back warm without all the bulk.
    Syl
    Syl

  6. #76
    Senior Member TinkerQuilts's Avatar
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    Apr 2011
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    GreenwoodVillage, CO
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    499
    I sew sometimes in a large basement room. Very nice in the summer, but in the winter I have an EdenPure heater that warms the room up nicely. It's on wheels and rolls around easily to whereever I need it.

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