Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 4 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 76

Thread: Sewing in a cold basement, HELP!

  1. #1
    Junior Member phranny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    260

    Sewing in a cold basement, HELP!

    I've spent the past month sprucing up the basement so I could have a place to "spread out" and be creative. Today I finished doing alterations on the last wedding dress I will ever do, and my treat was to go downstairs and sew! After two hours into the evening, my neck is stiff, and I feel a coldness in my back. If I am going to enjoy this little hideway, I am going to need an alternate heat source! What kind of portable heater should I be looking for? There is no place for a woodfired stove ( would love one).The gas furnace heats the upstairs, and I get a trickle of heat in my new room.

    Anyone else sew downstairs where it's cool? What do you use?
    phranny ~ I cannot call my day complete. 'til needle, thread, and fabric meet.

  2. #2
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    home again, after 27 yrs!
    Posts
    16,254
    Blog Entries
    2
    i have a tall portable heater i got from my old job. It works with a remote too. Once while still at my job, the heater quit working and I gave it to the maintenance department to keep. They fixed it and brought it back to me since it's more for a small area and not a large open one like theirs. Nice of them. it still works fine. Now, it's outside my sewing room. In the larger area where i watch t.v.
    . My sewing room gets warm after awhile with the lights on and if i open a heating vent too. So no worries there.
    i have a small square portable heater for the upstairs bathroom. It really blows heat out very well. You may look for one like that. Not sure of the name but it cost a bit if I remember.

  3. #3
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Knot Merrill, Southern Indiana
    Posts
    5,730
    If the furnace is down there, it should be relatively easy to add a single duct into the room you are working in. Talk to a furnace guy.

    Also ... there might be things you can/should do to the room as well.

    Is it carpeted? Adding a carpet pad and carpet will help a lot to keep the heat in.

    Are the windows good and tight? Are they thermopaned or just a single sheet of glass? If the windows are not the greatest - cover them with thermal drapes or the plastic stuff that you tape on then hit with the blow dryer to harden. Both will help keep out the drafts.

    What about the walls? If the walls are just concrete you are getting a lot of cold seeping from those as well. Ideally, cover them with a insulation then dry-wall over them. If money is an issue, cover the walls with floor to ceiling heavy drapes.
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

  4. #4
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    30,821
    A small electric heater with a fan would probably be enough to heat where you are sitting. My DIL has one for her music room in the basement that is about 10 inches square that she plugs in when she goes in there. It works great and she got it at the Canadian Tire store if that helps.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Mom3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    suburb of Milwaukee, WI
    Posts
    651
    Well, I will think of you when I sewing in my dining room which is about 10 feet from our woodstove.

    Seriously, look into getting a baseboard oil filled electric heater. We have one that we use in our camping trailer - love the heater.

    Shari

  6. #6
    Super Member virtualbernie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    3,588
    Blog Entries
    3
    I have the opposite problem--in the summer the air conditioning hits the bottom floor first and works it's way up--if I turn it down the upper floors get no air and in the winter same problem--upper floors get no heat I had a space heater down there but ended up having nightmares about all my fabric catching fire (kept going back downstairs to 2-3 times to double check that I had turned the heater off). I felt like I had OCD so I opted to move back upstairs when my daughter and her kids moved out. I hope you get a good answer!
    Bernie

  7. #7
    Senior Member Barbshobbies's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    520
    I have a small electric heater in my sewing room, the room is 12X14 feet, and in less than 10 min. it`s real warm. I don`t know if we can use brand names here on this site, but I`ll give it a shot. Mine is an Eden Pure and can be carried easily from room to room.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Spokane, Washington
    Posts
    344
    My sewing room is also in the basement. It is a finished room with heating vents, so it's not too bad. It helps to have carpet on the floor, and I have a ceramic portable heater that I occasionally have to use. I also have a great fleece vest and a flannel shirt that I keep down there for added layers of warmth....
    -Chris-
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Blessed are the children of quilters, for they shall inherit the quilts....

    It does not do well, Harry, to dwell on the dreams....and forget to live. - Albus Dumbledore

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    41
    We don't have a basement, but our house was built as a beach home without insulation. We have an unheated porch and unheated laundry room. We use the oil filled radiator heaters. They run about $40 at Walmart and work well. We also use plastic on our old windows- it always seems like the air blows right through.

  10. #10
    QM
    QM is offline
    Power Poster QM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Northern California mountains
    Posts
    12,541
    Electricity is cheap here. I have a small electric heater near my feet. That works for me. I also wear sweaters.

  11. #11
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    12,158
    Blog Entries
    1
    vertualbernie, may be too late to help (or you may have tried this anyway). When switching from heat to air and vice versa, did you go around and change all the vents? Hot air rises, so in winter you want all the vents on lower floors open and all the vents on the top floor closed. Cold air sinks, so in summer you want to close all the vents on the lower floors and open the vents on the top floor. We have to do that or we would have the same problem you had.

  12. #12
    Senior Member ThreadHead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Org. Texas now Florida
    Posts
    740
    Believe it or not I use my swing arm lamp. It's the kind that you bolt onto a table and it swings in all directions. I swing it around and set it about 2 feet from my back and the 75 watt bulb warms me up in no time. I don't need a heater, it's not that cold.
    Syl
    Syl

  13. #13
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Southwest Kansas
    Posts
    4,829
    I have one of those oil radiators in my sewing room during the winter. I keep it on the low setting and set the thermostat in about the middle and it keeps this room nice and warm.

  14. #14
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Front row
    Posts
    14,661
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen View Post
    I have one of those oil radiators in my sewing room during the winter. I keep it on the low setting and set the thermostat in about the middle and it keeps this room nice and warm.

    The portable oil radiators are great! One will heat a large room and no flame or electric glowing wires.
    Got fabric?

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    on the Iron Range in northern Minnesota
    Posts
    363

    Talking

    Hi,

    I also sew in my basement....love my sewing room! I do get some heat from the furnace in my room, my husband put in an extra vent as I am next to the furnace room, but in a MN winter it isn't enough...believe me! I have a small electric heater, bought it at WalMart, and I have it about 3-4 ft. from my sewing table blowing at me. I usually go down and turn it on half an hour before I plan on going down and it's just perfect down there. I also have a fleece shirt I keep on my sewing chair. I don't run it on high speed or temp, just enough to get the major chill out. Works well for me.

    In the summer I close my two vents or I freeze from the central air. Spring and fall are great!

    Bev
    Last edited by Bevsie; 10-09-2012 at 08:01 PM.
    Our lives are like quilts....bits and pieces....joys and sorrows....stitched together with love.
    Babylock Crescendo, Elegante2, and Ellure.....for the love of sewing!

  16. #16
    Super Member Sierra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    northern California
    Posts
    1,084
    I sew in an unheated/unairconditioned room. In the winter I use one of those little round body heaters, not a space heater and it really keeps me warm. I think it is a haolgen heater. In the summer I turn the air con in our apartment down to 71 and put a fan to blow the cool air to me across the hall to where I sew.

  17. #17
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    2,914
    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo View Post
    The portable oil radiators are great! One will heat a large room and no flame or electric glowing wires.
    I agree. I have two of these, and they come in handy in the wintertime, here or there. The radiant heat is very cozy. Just don't leave any electric heater turned on or even plugged in if you are not there. Also, make sure you keep the dust off any parts which get hot, (which on these is the tops and bottoms of each of those metal loops which hold the oil).

  18. #18
    Super Member 117becca's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    dayton OH
    Posts
    1,884
    I also sew in the basement -- be weary of the little box heaters...they're expensive to run!! A couple years ago over Christmas break, I spent almost 2 weeks solid(about 80 hrs) in the basement sewing and it doubled my electric bill - or about $50 for those 2 weeks of heat!!

    I am getting ready to buy a couple of those oil heaters. They have a thermostat on them. I do hear you have to turn them on before you go down there to warm up the space - but have read great reviews. The Honeywell at Home Depot has a 3 yr warranty on it.
    my name is becca and i'm a quilt-a-holic :-)

  19. #19
    Super Member alleyoop1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,347
    Wish I had a basement to spread out my stuff but unfortunately the water table is too high in our area so houses don't have basements! I continue to squeeze all my sewing things into a corner of the office!

  20. #20
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,487
    Blog Entries
    2
    If you do go with a portable heater, plug the heater and a lamp into the same surge strip and use the toggle on the strip to turn them both on/off. This way you can tell at a glance if the heater has been left on.
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

  21. #21
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    15,121
    You've had a lot of good suggestions ... and not knowing all the variables of your situation, it's hard for us to know how to zero in on your solution.

    I sew in a finished basement with cement floors. I do have carpet around my sewing area ... a nuisance for pins and thread, though warmer underfoot, and some padding when standing at the ironing board. Compromise!

    For the heat rises, cold drops issue ... I turn the fan of my furnace on before I go downstairs and that helps to get the air moving, so I get more use of the heat!

    If you can, position yourself near where the duct work brings the heat to you. If not, consider some renos to the ductwork to make it work better for you.

    And I always keep a fleece vest handy to put on/off as needed!

    When it comes to summer ... you'll love the coolness of your basement and will discover it's the BEST way to beat our Ontario heat and humidity! I get a lot of sewing done when it's just too hot to exist ... and as I go up the stairs, the wall of heat hits me!!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Sew many ideas ... just sew little time!!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

  22. #22
    Super Member tutt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    1,040
    Make sure you get a electric ceramic heater. They are much safer.

  23. #23
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    9,385
    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo View Post
    The portable oil radiators are great! One will heat a large room and no flame or electric glowing wires.
    I had several different space heaters , the one with the oil in the core work wonderfully. If its a sewing day .. I go down and turn it on about 45 minutes before. One thing I would not do with out... WOOL socks ... simple but its amazing how much warmer I am.

  24. #24
    Senior Member roda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Okla
    Posts
    537
    Ok I know this sounds crazy but I like to sew bare footed so these little piggy get cold. I have a heated welping pad under my machine. These are like heating pads that are use in dog kennals are in ferrin crates for pigs

  25. #25
    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Ashdown, AR
    Posts
    9,645
    Blog Entries
    1
    They have those electric space heaters that are really nice and put out a lot of heat. They are also making them a lot safer than they used to. You can find a lot of different kinds at Lowes or Home Depot. Even Walmart handles them. Be sure to check the size space they heat on the box along with all of the diferent features. Hope you find somethig that will make your new sewing room extra cozy. Happy quilting!
    Be the best that you can be at everything you do.
    Find me on Facebook Be my friend Join my group
    Leesa Kemp's Material Things Fabric Sales and Auctions

Page 1 of 4 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.