Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 ... LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 76

Thread: Sewing in a cold basement, HELP!

  1. #26
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    West Central Illinois
    Posts
    99
    I have a friend who swears by her "ceramic" electric heater. It's very small, maybe 10 x 10 x 10. She claims it's very energy efficient.

  2. #27
    Super Member Happy Linda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Port Ludlow, WA
    Posts
    1,384
    Blog Entries
    5
    I have a portable heater.
    Linda

  3. #28
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Beautiful BC
    Posts
    1,214
    Blog Entries
    1
    Do you have a door on your sewing space? In our basement family room there is an opening, but no door to the stairs. In the winter we hang a heavy curtain over the door. That stops the heat from rising and limits some of the drafts.

    The family room has two more doors and a window. We hang a heavy drape over the entire window wall in the winter. The door to the garage is not insulated, so we put extra weather stripping around it and a heavy drape on it too.

    We have an oil filled radiator that we keep on low all the time and bump up when we are watching TV in there. The radiators are nice as they do not have a blower. There is no noise and no problem with patterns being blown around (I sew clothes too).

    We use the plastic sheeting on our two bathroom windows during the colder weather. It works really well.

    Someone else mentioned a fleece vest, I agree, keeping my back and neck warm makes a big difference.
    Attending University. I will graduate a year after my son and year before my daughter.

  4. #29
    Super Member katkat1946's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Adirondacks of NY
    Posts
    1,513
    If you don't need a lot, for some reason it seems to raise the temp a few degrees if you run a dehumidifier. I know lots of people use portable heaters and I have in the past as well. But my electrician friend REALLY doesn't like them and told me at least if I was going to use one not to run it on the highest setting. i've heard some good things about some newer ones that do run on electricity but it sounds more like the draw is more equal to a light bulb. Think there are some kind of quartz or ceramic parts that get heated up. I don't really know about them but have the impression that they are safer and also less expensive to run.

  5. #30
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    1,587
    Bad draft where I sew. Have a small heater that is wonderful.

    We converted half of our garage into a bedroom and added a window to make it "legal" but no heat run. Bought an "oil heater" and that sucker is great. Kicks out lots of heat. Check it out. Others are suggesting it too.
    If you don't work on it you'll never finish it.

  6. #31
    Senior Member RonieM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Stanley, NY
    Posts
    508
    I have a portable ceramic (electric) heater that I bought at Wal-Mart for about $20. It is pretty quiet and produces a nice amount of heat.

  7. #32
    Super Member Buckeye Rose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Monroe, IN
    Posts
    2,285
    If you decide to add a space heater, please look into the quartz infrared heaters. We heat our entire house (small but all chopped into small rooms) with the Eden Pure brand heaters, no furnace....we use three. They plug into standard 110 volt outlet and are very effecient. Our electric bill only went up $30 per heater per month, so total cost to heat house in the dead of winter was $90 per month. Not bad for electric heat. There are different brands to choose from, but I can only testify on Eden Pure.

  8. #33
    Junior Member phranny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    257

    thanks for the tips

    Last night after my sewing stint, I took a warm shower and pulled on my fleece pj's, and wrapped my wool pashmina (sp?) shawl around my shoulders. Today I am stiff up there, but I just came back from my fitness class, and I think all the stretching we did today will help it. Still cold in my back, but I have on my shawl again.

    I see in the Canadian Tire flyer there is a small 4 quartz element heater on sale, I had to get a rain-check as they were all sold out, as well as all the other CT stores in my area. What about those oil heaters, do they run on oil? Do you add oil to them, like a furnace?

    In the mean time, until the heater arrives, I'll think of other ways to keep cozy. The light bulb heating up my back idea sounds good! The car has electricly heated seats, I wonder if having a heating pad strapped to my back would make a difference. Maybe not the most attractive...........lol

    You ladies are great with all your ideas and tips and suggestions! And I do look forward to sewing down there in the summer. In the mean time, I have a few ideas to try here. Thanks everyone!
    phranny ~ I cannot call my day complete. 'til needle, thread, and fabric meet.

  9. #34
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Piedmont Virginia in the Foothills of the Blue Ridge Mtns.
    Posts
    8,212
    I broke down and bought one of these for this drafty old cottage last year and I love it! It's quiet, doesn't "blow" on me, can be heated up and turned off to let radiant heat come from it, and the size I bought is very portable. They can even serve as a side table - you can actually place things on top of them. http://www.edenpure.com/

    Jan in VA
    Jan in VA
    Living in the foothills
    peacefully colors my world.
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/members...bums19552.html

  10. #35
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    9,385
    Quote Originally Posted by phranny View Post
    Last night after my sewing stint, I took a warm shower and pulled on my fleece pj's, and wrapped my wool pashmina (sp?) shawl around my shoulders. Today I am stiff up there, but I just came back from my fitness class, and I think all the stretching we did today will help it. Still cold in my back, but I have on my shawl again.

    I see in the Canadian Tire flyer there is a small 4 quartz element heater on sale, I had to get a rain-check as they were all sold out, as well as all the other CT stores in my area. What about those oil heaters, do they run on oil? Do you add oil to them, like a furnace?

    In the mean time, until the heater arrives, I'll think of other ways to keep cozy. The light bulb heating up my back idea sounds good! The car has electricly heated seats, I wonder if having a heating pad strapped to my back would make a difference. Maybe not the most attractive...........lol

    You ladies are great with all your ideas and tips and suggestions! And I do look forward to sewing down there in the summer. In the mean time, I have a few ideas to try here. Thanks everyone!
    The oil heater I use is sealed , you never add anything. Mine is silent( a huge plus). I like this type better than the fan type, as I found the fan type dried out my eyes and mouth/throat.

  11. #36
    Super Member ube quilting's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    9,663
    Blog Entries
    31
    My basement studio is very damp in summer (dehumidifier) and cold in winter. I love my

    oil filled electric radiators
    .

    They are totaly self contained so no need to make any adjustments or adding oil to them. No flame or heat element to worry about either.

    I use three of them In a full 1500 sq ft space. They make it warm without any drafts and I don't even have to put them on high heat. I live in a cold climate. If I loose the electric I have kerosene heater for a back up.
    hope you find what will work for you.
    peace
    Last edited by ube quilting; 10-10-2012 at 04:13 PM.
    no act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted. Aesop

  12. #37
    Junior Member shawnan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    145
    Blog Entries
    1
    I like my infrared heater - it is another brand (SunHeat) than the EdenPure, but the same principle. It is efficient, and economical. It keeps our family room warm - we had a wood stove and replaced with a pellet stove but they both were almost too much as well as having a smell.
    Nancy (Go Big Red)
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Great things have been done for me,
    and I am filled with joy.

  13. #38
    Super Member Sassylass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    1,128
    I use a small micro heater you can buy them either at Home Hardware or Canadian Tire stores...works great for me!
    If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went. -Will Rogers

  14. #39
    Swap Hosts Krystyna's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    8,836
    Blog Entries
    23
    Why not try a good kerosene heater? They are inexpensive to use and if you keep the wick fresh, there is no odor.
    Krystyna
    Feel the fear and do it anyway!

  15. #40
    Senior Member rj.neihart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    776
    I have a small portable heater. With of the lights, and the heater, and of course wearing thick socks, I'm in heaven. In fact, sometimes I'm so warm, I'll leave the sewing room for a short time so I can cool off. I think mine is a menopause thing.

  16. #41
    Super Member grann of 6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Glenmoore, PA
    Posts
    7,468
    Blog Entries
    1
    I had my basement finished off about 10 years ago, into my sewing studio. I have laminate flooring that has a foam barrier under it, keeping the floor from getting real cold. He also insulated the walls thoroughly. And when I had the new furnace put in, I had them put a duct vent in that would heat (or cool) the entire room. It works wonderfully. I would not want a wood burning stove in a sewing room. The fabric will soak up the wood smell. I used to have one of those oil-filled heaters that I kept near me, but didn't like the oil smell it gave off. There are now ceramic heaters. Check with one of your home improvement stores, on what they think would be best for your situation.

  17. #42
    Senior Member Ccorazone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Midlothian,Texas
    Posts
    720
    You can get one of those infra-red heaters. They have a thermostat to adjust the heat. My sister had one and it kept an area of about 500 sq.ft. plenty warm.

    "Small deeds done are better than great deeds planned"
    Peter Marshall

    "Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take but by the moments that
    take our breath away". - Hilary Cooper
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/2HartsCreations?ref=si_shop

  18. #43
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Posts
    1,394
    I have a small electric heater for my office at work that has a temperature thermostat where you can set the temperature. I find I need it set at 72 degrees because everytime someone opens the front door my room fills with cold air. I got it at Big Lots and did not pay a fortune for it.

  19. #44
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    1,257
    They make many portable heaters, just search the local stores to see what is available in your area.
    Also placing a piece of carpet can help the floors. It is easy to insulate the walls as well, they make 4ft. x 8ft. X 1in. sheets of insulation that can be glued right to the concrete walls. The warmer, cozier you make it the more time you can spend quilting.

  20. #45
    Super Member quiltmom04's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    2,877
    I used to sew in the basement, too, and I would use one of those little square heaters under the sewing table, as it sort of trapped the heat under there, or sometimes I would put a heating pad on my lap or over the back of the sewing chair. Please remember to turn everything OFF when you are finished for the day!!

  21. #46
    Super Member sparkys_mom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    2,367
    I use a small Vornado electric heater. It keeps a small room pretty toasty and it doesn't get hot to the touch - important if you have fur babies. I used a 20% coupon and bought it at Bed Bath and Beyond. Another thing you might consider is a heated floor mat like this one. http://www.floormat.com/heated-mats/...rmth-mats.html
    Pat

  22. #47
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    14,850
    Quote Originally Posted by grann of 6 View Post
    I had my basement finished off about 10 years ago, into my sewing studio. I have laminate flooring that has a foam barrier under it, keeping the floor from getting real cold. He also insulated the walls thoroughly. And when I had the new furnace put in, I had them put a duct vent in that would heat (or cool) the entire room. It works wonderfully. I would not want a wood burning stove in a sewing room. The fabric will soak up the wood smell. I used to have one of those oil-filled heaters that I kept near me, but didn't like the oil smell it gave off. There are now ceramic heaters. Check with one of your home improvement stores, on what they think would be best for your situation.
    And being from the North Pole, Mrs. Santa must know how to keep warm!!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Sew many ideas ... just sew little time!!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

  23. #48
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Southwest Kansas
    Posts
    4,829
    Quote Originally Posted by quiltmom04 View Post
    I used to sew in the basement, too, and I would use one of those little square heaters under the sewing table, as it sort of trapped the heat under there, or sometimes I would put a heating pad on my lap or over the back of the sewing chair. Please remember to turn everything OFF when you are finished for the day!!
    I leave my oil radiator on all the time during the winter. It takes less energy to keep the space warm than it does to warm it up from cold every day. I suppose if you're only in your sewing room every once in a while you should turn things off but I'm in my room every day.

  24. #49
    Super Member Caswews's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Quilting, crocheting, sewing and crafting in my Sewing Room...Peaceful and wonderful !!
    Posts
    5,313
    In the winter time I use a small but tall heater in my sewing room. There is a huge industrial gas heater in there but it was there when we moved in and it stinks, so I prefer the small heater.
    When Life brings big winds of change that almost blows you over.Hang on tight and Believe.
    Words and hearts should be handled with care-for words when spoken and hearts when broken are the hardest things to repair. Author unknown to me
    Do what you feel in your heart to be right; for you'll be criticized anyway-Eleanor Roosevelt

  25. #50
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Tallmadge, OH
    Posts
    5,059
    I don't sew in the basement but our condo has no basement and the sun room is such that this time of year, it's cold out there. We bought a tower heater. That might work for you, but I think it would depend on how big an area it has to heat.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.