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Thread: Sewing in a cold basement, HELP!

  1. #51
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    We purchased a 'ceramic' type electric heater at Sam's Club. It is tall and thin; nice that it fits in the corner of my sewing area. It has a remote control, thermostat that displays room temp when it is turned on, then setting the desired temp and away it goes. Works great.

  2. #52
    Super Member AZ Jane's Avatar
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    My only question is, didn't you know your basement was cold in the colder months? I know my rooms upstairs get hotter in the afternoons so I always machine sew in the early mornings.
    Better to do something imperfectly, than nothing perfectly.
    Done is better than perfect.

  3. #53
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    I use to live in a house with a basement, the furnace was also placed in the basement, the duct work ran through out the house , but located in the basement, I just took one of the duct lines and cut an extra vent in it and it kept the basement cozy.

  4. #54
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    I sew in our basement, half of the basement has vents so they are warm, but not my part. I have 2 large work lights hanging over my cutting table and my sewing table, and initially it is cool when I first start sewing, but the heat from these 2 lights really warms me up. I have a small portable space heater but haven't had to use it. I usually dress warmer when I want to sew but have to take a layer off as it gets too warm then.
    'With God all is possible!"

  5. #55
    Super Member PenniF's Avatar
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    Maybe someone has said this.... they are about 100.00 - but the INFRA-RED heaters heat only "objects" not the air. They are very practical in open spaces - I have a friend that uses one in his workshop/shed. Please be careful with any non-electric space heater that might give off "fumes" - CO or CO2 - in an enclosed space.
    Of all the things i've lost, i miss my mind the most.

  6. #56
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    All of the suggestions are good. Do look at the windows and walls; can they be covered in some way to stop leaking the heat into outer space. We, too, use an oil-filled radiator-type heater that we purchased from Sears several years ago. They are quiet and radiate the heat well. We need it for a corner room, exposed to the wind and cold. My daughter uses 2 of them in her old house.

  7. #57
    Super Member Margie's Avatar
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    My sewing room is in the basement. I have one of those cast iron stoves that looks like old fashioned stove. The door is glass and looks live logs burning. You turn that on and it heats up so toasty, and you can turn it off and the metal still radiates the heat and keeps it warm. Highly recommend it.
    Margie....wannaBsewer
    favorite poem..Outwitted by Edwin Markham...He drew a circle that shut us out..heretic, rebel a thing to flout.
    But Love and I had the wit to win,
    We drew a circle that took him in!

  8. #58
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    [I use the dish heater. I got it at Costco for about 60 dollars last year....It is radiant heat and it works good. It is also economical to run....My daughter liked mine so well she got herself one.

  9. #59
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    I have an infrared heater-larger one & it works pretty well with the other suggestions. Dealer said to set heater off floor as concrete absorbs the heat. After buying several I found a heater with a fan does the best. the oil filled I have doesnt' have a fan & not efficent enough.

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jan in VA View Post
    I broke down and bought one of these for this drafty old cottage last year and I love it! It's quiet, doesn't "blow" on me, can be heated up and turned off to let radiant heat come from it, and the size I bought is very portable. They can even serve as a side table - you can actually place things on top of them. http://www.edenpure.com/

    Jan in VA
    Thank you for the link, Jan. I've just placed an order for the Eden Pure.

  11. #61
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    I use a radiator-looking electric heater. They are energy efficient because once the oil is heated, electricity is needed only to keep it hot. It has a thermostat so you can turn it down when it gets to the "right" temp, and it will keep the room that warm. I couldn't work without it - it heats up the room much faster than the house heat.

  12. #62
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    My sewing room use to be a deck and there is no real heat and I use a space heater seems to work for me.

  13. #63
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    This sounds like a nice excuse to just cover all of your walls with quilts as insulation! Pretty and practical!

  14. #64
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    I have taken the time to read thru everyone's posts and there are at least 6 others who have mentioned the same product my family uses. The absolute BEST auxiliary heater is EDEN PURE. It is reasonable, a quartz heater, VERY SAFE and costs no more than an ordinary light bulb to heat up to 1500 sq. ft. I have two in my home and only spend $700 for a full year for oil for our furnace. There is no change in my electric bill. I've had two for over 5 years.
    This is the one that Bob Vila advertises. My parents, my sister, a cousin and both my daughters all own at least one of these Eden Pure heaters. I always tell folks about them....they are the answer to your problem. Go to EdenPure.com and check them out. They come in two sizes....you will see which one will work best for your area - GOOD LUCK!!
    Last edited by Debbie C; 10-11-2012 at 05:56 PM.

  15. #65
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    I have one of those electric fireplaces, heats the room and gives the look of flames of a real fireplace with no mess. I have one that looks like a cast iron stove and one that looks like a fashionable fireplace. They look so real now.

  16. #66
    Senior Member Tennessee Suzi's Avatar
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    I have the same problem....Want to go down and sew but it's too cold for me. Mine is a finished basement that is half carpeted but still cold. My dining room table is a mess now! lol
    Happy Quilting
    Love in Christ
    Suzi

  17. #67
    Super Member chuckbere15's Avatar
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    I use an electric heater named Vornado. Doesn't get hot to help protect pets and a thermostat. They run around 80 dollars, much less than Edan Pure. And I use it in my trailer for camping in the spring and fall. I just remember to unplug it like my iron when not in use.
    The Quilting Bear

  18. #68
    Senior Member ctipton's Avatar
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    I use the oil filled one from walmart on the front porch and warms up quickly and i don't worry about leaving it unattened with GBs

  19. #69
    Junior Member phranny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ Jane View Post
    My only question is, didn't you know your basement was cold in the colder months? I know my rooms upstairs get hotter in the afternoons so I always machine sew in the early mornings.
    LOL. I think I was in denial. Surely after painting all the walls, applying an epoxy floor finish, moving in ceiling to floor bookcases and filling them with fabric, wouldn't the temperature go up at least a few degrees? Having the lights on, iron plugged in, and the machines humming would raise it another degree or two? My internal thermometer runs a little higher than my DH, so I like it cooler. All of my extremities (toes, fingers, tip of my nose) were warm, so I wasn't concerned. But after sitting there for a few hours, I felt it in my back. Maybe I need more "insulation" (stash) down there.

    Anyone know the R value of fabric?
    phranny ~ I cannot call my day complete. 'til needle, thread, and fabric meet.

  20. #70
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    I feel your pain. My husband builds me a fire in the wood burner when I go down to quilt for the same reason. I am extremely cold natured and he bought me a little ceramic heater about 10 years ago. It really works well. I agree with the poster that said to put it on a power strip with a lamp so that you know it is off. This is what I do with my vintage machines so that I am not always trying to crawl under a table to unplug them.

    I hope you can make your new space more comfortable. We have three ducts in our basement and my husband closes them for summer and opens them back up for winter (just because he is taller and can reach them w/out a step stool). A single duct to your area should be too expensive.

    Good luck and keep stitchin'!

  21. #71
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    I had the same problem when I had my computer near the front windows. I took a lap quilt, folded it in half. and put it around my shoulders. I was thinking of attaching a strap of some kind to each side to put my arms through so it would not slip off, but it was warm! I ended up moving the desk, and didn't need it then.

  22. #72
    Junior Member nlpakk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phranny View Post
    I've spent the past month sprucing up the basement so I could have a place to "spread out" and be creative. Today I finished doing alterations on the last wedding dress I will ever do, and my treat was to go downstairs and sew! After two hours into the evening, my neck is stiff, and I feel a coldness in my back. If I am going to enjoy this little hideway, I am going to need an alternate heat source! What kind of portable heater should I be looking for? There is no place for a woodfired stove ( would love one).The gas furnace heats the upstairs, and I get a trickle of heat in my new room.

    Anyone else sew downstairs where it's cool? What do you use?
    I sew out in my husband's shop as we live in a smaller, older mobile home and there is no room for my sewing. The heat is in the floor which helps and my feet are warm but my hands get cold so I have been using a small electric cube heater and I put it on the desk near me but of course you have to be careful and keep it away from your fabric so that's not really the best option. My other alternate heat source is an oil filled electric heater which works wonderful and I probably use that more now. Good luck!

  23. #73
    Super Member sewingsuz's Avatar
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    I have the Presto Heat Dish heater from Costco and i really like it.
    Suzanne
    Asking a seamstress to mend is like asking Picasso to paint your garage.

  24. #74
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    We have an efficiency apartment built into the farm shop for our 21 year old grandson. We purchased an Eden Pure heater and have been very pleased with it. We ordered it online and were so pleased with the company we eventually bought 2 air purifiers from them. They are recommended by Bob Villa, the home repair guy from TV. www.edenpure.com
    Cheryl Robinson
    http://www.silverneedlestitching.com
    APQS Millenium Longarm with Intelliquilter

  25. #75
    Senior Member ThreadHead's Avatar
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    I took a piece of heavy wool material about 2 .5 foot long, 16 inches wide, folded almost in half, making the back a little longer than the front, cutting a hole the fold so I could slip it over my head and made a dickie. I have two of them and wear them under my clothes to keep warm. This keeps my chest and back warm without all the bulk.
    Syl
    Syl

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