Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 43

Thread: Sheets for backing?????????????

  1. #31
    Super Member Feathers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    3,029
    Hi Ruth Camp:
    I've never used sheets for backing a quilt I've made so I can't comment on how good or bad it is. I will tell you that I recently went to a quilt show that had a quilt that was over 100 years old . It had a great story pinned to the quilt which told lots of info about this postage stamp-sized pieced quilt in all the old fabrics from cast off clothing of the family 100 years ago. ....great story, quilt was all hand sewn except that whoever ownes it now decided to "reverbish" it. They put a poly/cotton sheet on it as a backing. It totally RUINED this old, vintage quilt and everyone who went through the show came away shaking their heads that the person who did the referbish used a 1970's psychodelic daisy print sheet on this quilt. I'm sure the original maker of the quilt rolled over in her grave a time or two over this horrible choice of backing fabric. I was looking for the Quilt Crime Police to do something but they weren't around. :twisted: This was a great learning experience for me...I vowed never to use a sheet on a quilt as I'm afraid if I did the QCP would show up at my door! :roll: Feathers

  2. #32
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Oh.
    Posts
    798
    Hi Feathers, I appreciate you comments about using sheets on quilts. For the purpose of restoring an old quilt, I would say it would not be at all compatible to use a poly/cotton sheet for backing.!

    But to hasten on, for some of us who do a lot of charity quilts, we are working on an entirely different premise....making something that will keep someone warm and at a reasonable cost to the quilter.

    I am sure I am not the only person who uses poly/cotton piecing in their quilts. I use whatever fabrics I can get and adding a poly/cotton sheet to the back just makes it more economical to create for that purpose.

    We all have our own ideas of how and why we make quilts. For those who want to use them to "show", there is one set of rules. Making an future heirloom has another set of rules, and would require that you consider the life span for that work. Hand quilting probably would not be easy to do on some of the poly/cotton sheets. But for me, the sheet is ideal. My quilts are all machine made, so the quilting stitch is durable and works well on sheets. I can buy them at Thrift stores for $3 or $4 dollars each. I am able to make and give more quilts when I keep my expenses low.

    So you see, the rules don't apply to all quilt making. Living on a retirement income does not allow for an expensive quilt to be made and given in a situation where it will get some pretty rough use.

    Looking at the topic of quilting as a Big Picture will teach all of us that one set of rules does not apply to all. And I am glad you were able to see the incongruent use in the case of restoration. That took a sharp eye, so I would say you are a savvy quilter. Keep up the good work. We all have a lot to learn.

    June in Cincinnati

  3. #33

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    33
    i've used sheets in the begining when i first started to quilt. i didn't really have any kind of problems using the sheets . but in the begining when i first started i all so went to the thrift stores. i wanted to save money so i bought some of those thicker covers to use for the batting instead of buying the batting, and omg how horrible it was to roll that under and try to quilt . it was a b#@#*&:". when i finally started useing the real stuff (batting) i said i would never do that again.batting is so much lighter and easier.

  4. #34
    Super Member Feathers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    3,029
    Hi June in Cincinatti:
    Thanks for your explainationl. I, too, use donated fabrics and $1 a yard Walmart fabric specials in my quilts. I have also learned our local St. VdeP. has great fabric that you can get for 50% off on Senior Day so I take advantage of that whenever I'm in the area which is EVERY SR. day! :wink:

    Our quilt group makes and donates quilts for DHS Foster kids in our area. Last year 10 of us made 47 quilts for these kids and we try hard to make them as inexpensively as possible as, like you said, they get some pretty rough wear and tear and won't be heirlooms but will be snuggle blankets for kids who are afraid and whose whole future is uncertain. We also make quilts for our Veteran's Home, and we sent 10 quilts to Katrina victims so maybe what I've learned from you and all this dialog is that I should be looking for sheets to curb the expenses of the quilt. Will check into this on Sr. day! :D

    Feathers

  5. #35
    Super Member vicki reno's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    2,140
    I was given an antique quilt that is not in such great shape and one partially quilted that someone had made trying to copy the old one. they used either original 20 and 30 prints or repros I don't know but tried to expand it to fit a bigger bed and put the most awful poly cotton blend as a wide border and as the back. So I ordered some wide backing fabric in a repro print and ripped off the ugly border and attached the repro print. Since the quilt was half quilted, I left the ugly backing fabric since no one will really see it anyway. Its basted and waiting to be quilted but looks so much better now. :!:

  6. #36
    Senior Member GiGi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    326
    Blog Entries
    1
    :D

  7. #37
    Senior Member GiGi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    326
    Blog Entries
    1
    Cotton comes from many sources; e.g. India, Pakistan, USA, etc. Once again, you get what you pay for. First runs are always the best to buy, easy to stitch through. Please read the package BEFORE purchasing to save your fingers and your quilt. Thank you.

  8. #38
    Senior Member GiGi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    326
    Blog Entries
    1
    Why don't you use clothes from the thrift stores? They have been washed and are ready to cut. Just button them and you already have double cuts. Material comes in many forms, not just off the bolt. Thank you. :D

  9. #39

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    6
    For crib and twin size quilts my Mother and I like using fannel sheets. We do prewash them a couple of times in hot water to preshrink them. The weave dose not seem to be as dence as percail sheets are, and have a cuddly feel. I offen use satin blanket binding to add the"silky feel" that alot of my grandkids like.

  10. #40
    Moderator Up North's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    North East Lower peninsula of Michigan
    Posts
    6,416
    I hand quilt and the Main stays from walmart are easy to hand quilt through. I'll use nothing else unless I really need a different type of fabric or color. they are 200 thread count 60% cotton 40% poly.

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.