Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Stash Building Rules

  1. #1
    Super Member Pamela Artman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Michigan U.P.
    Posts
    1,076
    I've had people ask me how I built my stash and how to know what fabrics to buy. So, I thought I'd write down my Stash Building "Rules"

    1. If you fall in love with a fabric, buy it. If you don't have fabrics to go with it you can find some later.
    2. Carry swatches with you of your favorite "focus" fabrics and then if you run into a sale, you can buy what matches the fabrics you already have.
    3. Build up a supply of different colors. For example, I realized one day that I had very few yellow and gold fabrics and no browns or oranges whatsoever, but I had tons and tons of blues and greens and purples. That helped me steer away from the colors I had in abundance and look for colors I was lacking.
    4. Buy a variety of prints (as well as some solids and blenders) - tone on tones, small and large florals, plaids, stripes, polka dots, and some outrageous prints just for fun (like jungle prints or sparkly fireworks!) A mix of fabrics makes quilts interesting!
    5. Don't forget border fabrics - and be sure you buy enough to make borders for a full or queen size quilt.
    6. Shop for a variety of fabric styles - 30's reproductions, civil war reproductions, batiks, holiday fabrics, juvenile prints, flannels, and baby fabrics (baby quilts make great gifts!) Preprinted labels are also handy to have on hand.
    7. Be sure to include a variety of values - darks, mediums and lights. And don't forget a good supply of background fabrics. For me, it's white, cream or beige tone on tones as well as some bleached and unbleached muslin.

    And a rule I made for myself, 8 - know when to quit. I've come to the point where I know I have a big enough stash and to keep buying fabric just to pile it up is wasteful and indulgent. I have enough fabric in my stash that I can make quilts for the rest of my life and never run out. It was hard to break that habit at first but now I buy only what I need to finish a project I'm working on if I can't find it in my stash.

  2. #2
    Super Member MistyMarie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,427
    Those rules sound great. I have to say that my problem is I buy fabric with a project in mind, then a few months (or years later) I cannot remember what I bought to go with what. I then am afraid to use the fabric because I KNOW I intended it for some project and if I use it, I might regret it later when I remember why I bought it in the first place. I am getting to where I write down what I want to do with the fabric and tacking it to it so that I can remember what my thinking behind each piece I purchase was.

  3. #3
    Super Member Pamela Artman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Michigan U.P.
    Posts
    1,076
    Quote Originally Posted by MistyMarie
    Those rules sound great. I have to say that my problem is I buy fabric with a project in mind, then a few months (or years later) I cannot remember what I bought to go with what. I then am afraid to use the fabric because I KNOW I intended it for some project and if I use it, I might regret it later when I remember why I bought it in the first place. I am getting to where I write down what I want to do with the fabric and tacking it to it so that I can remember what my thinking behind each piece I purchase was.
    That's a good idea. I keep a notebook of quilts I've made, quilts I'm working on, quilts I have planned (either pattern, fabric or both) and quilts I want to make someday. If it's planned with the pattern, I bundle all the fabrics together and put them on my shelf with the pattern inclosed. most of my bundles don't have patterns yet, I just bundled fabrics together that I bought to go together. I have about 30 of these bundles so I have lots of future projects to do! LOL

  4. #4
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    14,206
    The only one I sort of disagree with is #6.

    I've decided to not start any more "categories" - because if I have "some of" something, then I think I need "more of" that same something.

    I do think it's good to have a variety of prints within a category.

  5. #5
    Super Member Chele's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Belle Isle, Florida
    Posts
    6,739
    Your rules are great. I should follow number 8 more! It's just hard!

  6. #6
    Super Member raptureready's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    5,305
    In my world there's a 9th rule:

    If it's on a good sale, buy it. If it can be used as a backing, buy lots of it.

  7. #7
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    4,054
    While your rules may work just fine for you and your style and tastes in quiltmaking, I wouldn't put them out there in such specificity for those who are just starting to build a stash.

    I think it's much better to start out with a favorite color palette (warm or cool is good) and style of fabric, buying a fairly wide selection in limited coordinating colors in all values, blenders and prints, with some neutrals added in to the mix, than it is to spread out too much in the beginning. Building a large, workable stash takes years and it's a very personal journey. Start with a strong foundation before choosing the furniture. :-D

  8. #8
    Google Goddess craftybear's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Central Indiana (USA)
    Posts
    31,246
    Blog Entries
    194
    thanks for sharing!

  9. #9
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    14,206
    Quote has been edited:

    Quote Originally Posted by ghostrider
    ...

    I think it's much better to start out with a favorite color palette (warm or cool is good) and style of fabric, buying a fairly wide selection in limited coordinating colors in all values, blenders and prints, with some neutrals added in to the mix, than it is to spread out too much in the beginning. ... :-D
    Good advice!

    It's like building a workable wardrobe. If one has 12 pieces that go together well, one has all sorts of possibilities.

    By the same token, if one has 100 garments, and nothing goes well, all one basically has is a crowded closet.

  10. #10
    Power Poster dkabasketlady's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Lakeland, Florida
    Posts
    10,282
    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray
    Quote has been edited:

    Quote Originally Posted by ghostrider
    ...

    I think it's much better to start out with a favorite color palette (warm or cool is good) and style of fabric, buying a fairly wide selection in limited coordinating colors in all values, blenders and prints, with some neutrals added in to the mix, than it is to spread out too much in the beginning. ... :-D
    Good advice!

    It's like building a workable wardrobe. If one has 12 pieces that go together well, one has all sorts of possibilities.

    By the same token, if one has 100 garments, and nothing goes well, all one basically has is a crowded closet.

    That's very sound advice!
    I think the list should be combined with everyone's thoughts for a list! We're all different and have different wants & needs!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.