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Thread: Anyone make Salt Rising Bread?`

  1. #1
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    Anyone make Salt Rising Bread?`

    I have tried 5 times to make this bread and have had no luck. Does anyone on here make it and please tell me how you do it. I have several receipes, one called for 2 potatoes sliced thin, one make a batter with lukewarm water, (it almost worked, lol).

  2. #2
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    Is it actually a salt rising bread or a self rising bread? I had never heard of salt rising bread. Would you post one of your recipes you have tried, maybe that would help in determining your problem.

  3. #3
    Junior Member susie337's Avatar
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    My dad particularly loved salt-rising bread! I remember eating it as a child. According to Wikipedia, "Salt-rising (or salt-risen) bread is a dense white bread that was widely made by early settlers in the Appalachian Mountains in a process that involves no yeast. Instead, the leavening agents are wild organisms ubiquitous in nature. Salt in the name is a misnomer, since the salt levels are relatively low," And yes that article mentions using potatoes in the starter.

    Here is a link to one recipe: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/salt-rising-bread/

  4. #4
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    SALT RISIN' BREAD
    (a grandma favorite from 60 years ago. Not easy to make it come out Right. This one has nearly disappeared.)

    1 CUP WHOLE MILK
    2 TABLESthingyS OF GRANULATED SUGAR
    1 1/2 TEASthingyS SALT
    1/3 CUP WHITE CORNMEAL
    1 CUP LUKEWARM WATER
    4 1/2 CUPS SIFTED ALL PURPOSE FLOUR
    2 TBSP LARD

    Scald milk. Remove from fire and stir in 1 tbsp. granulated sugar, the salt, and corn meal. Mix thoroughly and turn into a 2 quart jar or pitcher; cover and set in a pan of water which is hot to the hand, or 120 degrees. Let the mixture stand, in the hot wter in a warm place for 6 or 7 hours, or until it has fermented.

    When the gas escapes freely, stir in the water mixed with1 tbsp. granulated sugar. Then stir in 2 cups of sifted flour and beat thoroughly. Return the jar to the hot water bath (120 degree) and let the sponge rise until it is very light and full of bubbles.

    Turn the sponge at once into a large warm mixing bowl and gradually stir in 2 1/4 cups sifted white bread flour, or just enough to make a stiff dough. Divide the dough in half, shape into loaves and place in bread pans that have been generously greased with lard.

    NOTE that so far no fat has been used. NOW brush the loaves with 2 tbsp. lard melted to spreading consistency. Cover the two loaves with a light, clean,dry towel (or a double thickness of cheesecloth), and let them rise in a warm place until the dough is 2 1/2 times its original bulk.

    Bake in the oven at 375 degrees for 10 minutes only, then lower the heat to moderate (350) and continue baking for 25 minutes longer.

    You should further note that the sponge and dough of salt risin' bread require a higher temperature (120 degrees) for rising than the yeast mixtures. After the rising, the temperature of 120 should be kept as steady as possible. Homemade salt risin' bread is not so light as yeast bread is, but it is moist and crumbly.

  5. #5
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    I've found that having a wood stove makes the step of rising much easier than trying to keep the water hot for 6/7 hours at the right temp. I make this on a day that's cold outside and I know I'm going to have the wood stove blazing all day.
    Then I place the covered bowl, in the water, on the hearth near the rear of the stove and let it work. Good Luck!

  6. #6
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    I never heard of this bread.

  7. #7
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    When I was a child, now 77, we used to buy this bread at Van De Camps bakery in So. California.
    It was SO good when toasted, that Grandma finally became an expert at making it at home for all
    us kids. We used to call it "stinky bread" because of the strong odor of fermenting when it was
    baked. LOL
    Above is the recipe she used and I made it many years ago myself...for my kids. They called it
    'stinky' too. Tastes wonderful. Let us know how your's comes out this time around, Bonnie!

  8. #8
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    Our town is famous for their salt rising bread......true old fashion salt rising is absolutely to die for toasted. Has a short shelf life because their are no preservatives.
    What I know is that the bakery had problems at one point getting the kind of yeast needed to get the true flavor and texture. The baker has since tried to create his own yeast......the bread is ok.....but not as good as it was. Good luck and if you get a good recipe that makes a great loaf of bread.....please post!

  9. #9
    Super Member Auntie Em's Avatar
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    I haven't heard of this in years....used to have it at Grandma's house....loved it!!!
    There is no place like home!

  10. #10
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    Thanks so much Terri123 for the receipe. This one is a little different from the others I've seen and does not take as much flour. O.K. I will try this one, try to keep the temp correct and will post a picture "IF it turns out o.k." lol. Thanks everyone else, hope you now know what "salt rising" bread is. It is wonderful toasted with jelly or jam or just good toasted with your meals. It is made mostly by the Amish here in our area. I will try again tomorrow!!!!

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