Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 4 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 38

Thread: Need Good Southern Biscuit Recipe

  1. #1
    Senior Member QuiltMania's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southeast Michigan
    Posts
    826
    My DH grew up in Georgia. My MIL made the best biscuits I ever tasted. She gave me the recipe years ago but I'll be darned if I can make the things. They taste more like bad pie crust when I make them and now I have mislaid the recipe. No one else seems to have the recipe. Does anyone out there have a good Southern biscuit recipe that is easy to make?

  2. #2
    Super Member MissTreated's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    N61 6.1839', W149 52.0138'
    Posts
    1,222
    I find the Betty Crocker recipe to make very light biscuits. YMMV

    2 c. flour
    1 tsp. salt
    2 1/2 tsp. baking powder
    2/3 c. milk
    2/3 c. shortening

    Cut the shortening into the flour and other dry ingredients.
    Mix in the milk.
    Roll out dough to 1/2 inch thick. Cut into desired shape. Put on ungreased cookie sheet. Bake at 425 degrees until golden brown, 20 to 25 minutes. Take them out of pan and put on cooling rack while they are hot. Add your favorite jam or just butter.

  3. #3
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    The middle of an IL cornfield
    Posts
    6,873
    Blog Entries
    1
    According to my Aunts in Virginia step one is White Lily flour.Her biscuits are awesome and she insists on Whitle Lily. As for the rest of the recipe, who knows? She grabs handsful of stuff and mushes it together in a bowl and then magically pinches off perfectly round, perfectly sized biscuits. It boggles my mind!!

    Personally, I buy the frozen kind. Not Pilsbury. They come in a clear package with red writing (I think) and say Southern style biscuits. They are not as good as my Aunt's but they are much nicer than the pop cans.

  4. #4
    Junior Member Love2Craft's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    NW Washington
    Posts
    112
    Blog Entries
    2
    This a recipe I got from my daughter...not sure if they are Southern...but they are delicious!!

    Best Biscuits

    Stir together:

    2 cups flour
    4 tsp baking powder
    tsp. salt

    Cut in:

    cup shortening


    Mix together and add to the flour mixture:

    1 egg
    2/3 cups milk

    Knead 8-10 times, cut out and bake at 375 for 10-12 minutes

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Western Kentucky
    Posts
    97
    Buttermilk is cruial. I bake by feel but buttermilk makes all the difference.
    Self rising White Lily flour, Crisco and whole milk buttermilk. Don't knead but just enough to make dough hold together.
    I prefer the unbleached flour but sometimes it's hard to get.

  6. #6
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    The middle of an IL cornfield
    Posts
    6,873
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by bizybess
    Buttermilk is cruial. I bake by feel but buttermilk makes all the difference.
    Self rising White Lily flour, Crisco and whole milk buttermilk. Don't knead but just enough to make dough hold together.
    I prefer the unbleached flour but sometimes it's hard to get.
    Yep, my Aunt is a huge buttermilk fan, too. Jeeze, now I want to go visiting for biscuits and gravy.

  7. #7
    Zoe
    Zoe is offline
    Junior Member Zoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    109
    I have never been able to make light and fluffy biscuits until I tried the recipe on the back of Gold Medal Self-rising flour:

    2-1/2 cups self-rising flour
    2 teaspoons sugar
    1/2 cup butter or shortening
    3/4 to 1 cup buttermilk, milk, or whipping cream.

    Stir together the flour and the sugar. Cut in the butter using a fork until the mixture is crumbly. Stir in buttermilk until dough leaves the side of the bowl.

    On lightly floured surface, knead dough just until smooth. Roll to 1/2-inch thickness, and cut dough with floured 2-1/2-inch biscuit cutter or glass. Place on ungreased baking sheet 1 inch apart for crusty sides, touching for soft sides.

    Bake for 10-12 minutes at 450degrees Farenheit. Makes 12 biscuits.

  8. #8
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    3,232
    White Lily or Southern Biscuit self rising flour. I use butter flavor Crisco. Hot oven.
    I will try and figure out my recipe. I think true Southern biscuits are made by sight and feel as much as any recipe.
    My 13 year old g-daughter has mastered making biscuits this past summer. Another generation of Southern cooks.
    I'll be glad to make a pan anytime for my friends on this site.

  9. #9
    enjoylife950's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    138
    3 cups self-rising soft wheat flour
    10 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch pieces and chilled, plus 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted for brushing the tops
    1 1/4 cups buttermilk
    Directions
    Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.

    Place the flour and chilled butter in a medium mixing bowl. Work the butter into the flour with a pastry cutter, a fork, or your fingertips until the butter pieces are a little larger than an English pea, but not larger than a lima bean. If you are using your fingers, work quickly so that the heat of your hands won't melt the butter.

    Pour in all of the buttermilk and, using light pressure, fold the mixture a few times with a plastic spatula until it holds together. Do not overmix. In order to make light biscuits, it is important to work the dough as little as possible.

    Turn the dough out onto a floured board and knead it quickly and gently 6 to 10 times or until it begins to be almost homogenized. There will be large pieces of butter throughout. Sprinkle a little flour under the dough so that it won't stick to the board and lightly dust the top of the dough so that it won't stick to the board and lightly dust the top of the dough so that it won't stick to the rolling pin. Roll the dough out to about 1/2-inch thickness.

    Cut the dough into 2-inch rounds, place on an ungreased baking sheet, and bake in the preheated oven for about 15 minutes. I like the biscuits to be crispy and brown on the top and bottom, but not dry in the middle. Remove the baking sheet from the oven and brush the tops of the biscuits with the melted butter. Serve right away.

    Now comes the important part: deciding how many biscuits you want to eat. When they are served, take that many. Then, instead of using a knife to cut them, use your fingers to separate the tops from the bottoms. Butter the centers lavishly and replace the tops. Another taste treat, a southern tradition that has all but become history, is to mix together equal parts sorghum and butter with a fork and spread on your hot biscuits. If you can't find sorghum, use regular molasses. The results won't be quite as exquisite, but you'll get the idea.

    Next Recipe
    More recipes? Try these recommendations:

  10. #10
    enjoylife950's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    138
    Ingredients
    2 cups self-rising flour
    1/2 teaspoon baking powder
    1 teaspoon sugar
    2 tablespoons shortening
    2 tablespoons butter or margarine
    1/3 cup buttermilk
    1/3 cup whole milk
    1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon water
    Directions
    Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F. Great an 8 by 8 by 2-inch baking pan well. Sift the flour, baking powder, and sugar into a bowl. Cut in the shortening and butter until the mixture resembles coarse cornmeal. Make a well in the center of the flour and pour in the buttermilk and milk. Mix lightly and quickly with your hands to form a dough moist enough to leave the sides of the bowl. Turn onto a lightly floured surface. Knead by picking up the sides of the dough away from you while pressing down with the palms of your hands and pushing the dough away. Repeat 6 or 7 times. Work the dough into a large ball while kneading. Keep your fingers dry by frequently dipping them in dry flour. Pinch off portions of dough for desired size biscuit. Press lightly to make the biscuits look flat on the pan. Make sure the biscuits touch each other. Bake for 15 minutes.

Page 1 of 4 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.