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Thread: Cresta T132-3

  1. #1
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    Cresta T132-3

    Hi, new here!

    I guess I can count the old Cresta as 'vintage', so I thought this to be the best place to post first!

    My dad moved house recently, and I took the chance to retrieve some old stuff that has been in his house for many a year, mostly my old junk, but also a few things I know he's unlikely to really want... such as this sewing machine. I'm pretty sure it was my Gran's, and I have vague images of recollection from when I was little.

    Now, unfortunately, I'm not into sewing, except when the buttons on my coat fall off, and I have never really understood just how sewing machines work.

    However, seeing as this machine has probably not seen the light of day for maybe 20-25 years, I thought it would only be fair to get it out and take some interest, so tonight I did... It's rather musty smelling and very greasy, so I guess the first thing to do would be to clean it up. I'm not sure plugging it in and turning it on straight away is the best idea... Anyway, here 'it' is!





    Dusty old case

















    Any tips on taking one of these apart and cleaning it?

    Many thanks

  2. #2
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by karissabob View Post
    Hi, new here!

    I guess I can count the old Cresta as 'vintage', so I thought this to be the best place to post first!

    My dad moved house recently, and I took the chance to retrieve some old stuff that has been in his house for many a year, mostly my old junk, but also a few things I know he's unlikely to really want... such as this sewing machine. I'm pretty sure it was my Gran's, and I have vague images of recollection from when I was little.

    Now, unfortunately, I'm not into sewing, except when the buttons on my coat fall off, and I have never really understood just how sewing machines work.

    However, seeing as this machine has probably not seen the light of day for maybe 20-25 years, I thought it would only be fair to get it out and take some interest, so tonight I did... It's rather musty smelling and very greasy, so I guess the first thing to do would be to clean it up. I'm not sure plugging it in and turning it on straight away is the best idea... Anyway, here 'it' is!





    Dusty old case

















    Any tips on taking one of these apart and cleaning it?

    Many thanks
    If you don't know what you are doing DON'T take it apart. That one has had someone overly enthusiastic with oil drench it good and what you see on it is dried up oil. Much better than rust though. It is a very cool old machine - I'm guessing it was made in Germany or somewhere in Europe. As far as learning to sew goes - that one is not a beginner sewing machine either for sewing or fixing up. There are lots of great videos on Utube for learning to sew. If you want to learn to do repairs, buy some old junker Singer 66 or 15 or a Japanese 15 or something else black and learn to fix up. If you want to sew, look for one already working, sew on it first so you don't ruin that machine. As a machine in the shape it is in it isn't worth very much. To someone who loves to sew and can fix it, it would be a great machine and you probably wouldn't be able to pry it away from them at any price. Try turning it by hand. Does it turn freely or is it a bit hard to turn. If it is hard to turn don't plug it in - it will only wear out the motor.
    Last edited by miriam; 11-12-2013 at 02:35 AM.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  3. #3
    Senior Member Vridar's Avatar
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    I would love the challenge of that machine. Looks like a Central Europe machine - Czechoslovakia? Don't let it get away, but like Miriam states, learn on another machine before tackling that one. That bobbin winder on the side is interesting. The Pictured Singer needles indicates it may take standard consumables. Keep us informed of your progress with pictures. Your original pictures are very good.
    Ron in NW MO

    "I wondered why the baseball was getting bigger, then it hit me."

  4. #4
    Senior Member Cecilia S.'s Avatar
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    Welcome to the board! If you're wondering why we all have the same avatar, it's because we're all a bit nuts. Miriam is the Nutsest, though; she sledgehammered a dead machine onto a rock and then tried to sell it on Craigslist for $500. Despite that, though, she is one of the experts here on cleaning, fixing, and re-assembling dis-assembled assemblies.

    :-)

    I agree, don't take it apart yet. However you could do a heckuva great cleaning job without taking things apart! Sunflowerzz on this board is -great- at cleaning machines. She gets them cleaner than one could possibly imagine. Maybe she will have some tips for you.

    By the way, its lines looks sort of early-Bernina-like.
    -Cecilia. Tinkering more than stitching, really.

  5. #5
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    I was thinking about the Phoenix as well as the Bernina and YOU HAVE THE MANUAL!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    That wacky ad is below in my signature - you can look at it and grin.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  6. #6
    Super Member Rodney's Avatar
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    Welcome Karrisabob, your machine kind of reminds me of some Elna machines I've seen. It looks like a very good machine to me. You probably don't need to take anything apart. There's some great tutorials here on cleaning up older machines. Spend a little time either reading them or watching the videos posted in them and read your owner's manual. Follow your owner's manual instructions for lubrication. Sewing machine oil is safe to use on any of these older machines. It won't damage the finish. Use it to wipe the machine down with a soft cloth. With a little effort it will loosen up the dried oil on the machine and you will be able to clean it off.

    I'm new to sewing and sewing machines too. Why is this not considered a beginner machine?
    Rodney

  7. #7
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rodney View Post
    I'm new to sewing and sewing machines too. Why is this not considered a beginner machine?
    Rodney
    This one has more complicated parts than some of the more simple machines. I doubt if you could come up with a service manual for it - there are service manuals out there for the old black machines.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  8. #8
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    Is the attendance manual not the same as the service manual?
    Quote Originally Posted by miriam View Post
    This one has more complicated parts than some of the more simple machines. I doubt if you could come up with a service manual for it - there are service manuals out there for the old black machines.

  9. #9
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    It is likely an owner's manual rather than a service manual. Some owner's manuals have better info than others.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  10. #10
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    This machine is often found labeled as a LADA. It was made in Czechoslovakia the early 1950s. It is a wonderful machine if working properly. Most reports on this series of machines say that the internal timing belt is usually found to be disintegrated. Turn the hand wheel and watch to see if the hook turns. If not, the belt is shot. You can also check the belt itself by removing the handwheel (one screw). The timing belt is no longer available. The new belts have a different pitch than the two old gears on the machine.

    I replaced the belt on mine about ten years ago. I bought new Riccar replacement gears. I had to machine a sleeve to reduce the inside diameter on one gear and machine out the other so they would fit the shafts. Then after finding a belt that almost fit, I had to install an idler pulley to take up the slack.

    Basically gear and belt replacement is not for the faint of heart.

    Cathy
    Cathy

    "Most sewing machine problems are due to the carbon based unit in the chair in front of the machine"

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