Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 24

Thread: Shocking Featherweight Question

  1. #11
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Central IL
    Posts
    6,742
    Just another comment, not an argument.

    Have rewired several machines myself, making positive sure there is no shorts. Have bought other machines with good wiring and inspected them finding no shorts.

    Have been buzzed by some of them. Turned the cord and the problem ceased. There are times you'll get a buzz from machines with good wiring.


    If you are afraid of the buzz use the back of your hand or your wrist to check the machine. That way your muscles in your hand cannot contract causing you to grab the object if there really is a short circuit.

    I'm done.

    Joe

  2. #12
    Senior Member cpfrog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    403
    It does sound like an "electrical" problem. I like the turning the plug over...def. worth a try.
    BUT....
    What is the table made of that you're using, even tho' the machine itself has new rubber 'feet'?
    What is the chair you are using? is it a metal folding chair or like that?
    What is the floor?
    What are you wearing on your feet?
    All this esp. if it's a "grounding" problem...

    These were just some other ideas to consider.
    By all means, STAY SAFE!!!
    cpfrog - "Those who sew together, grow together." - Amy Dickinson

  3. #13
    Super Member buslady's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Thumb of Michigan
    Posts
    2,261
    Blog Entries
    7
    Thank you all for the information. I am going to pull the machine out this weekend and see if I can see anything. Is there a way to ground the plug if that is the issue? I appologize if this has already been answered. When I have more time, I will go back and reread all the posts!! This is a great place when you need help. thank you sew much.
    Onalee Rose
    "There comes a time in your life, when you walk away from all the drama and people who create it. You surround yourself with people who make you laugh. Forget the bad, and focus on the good. Love the people who treat you right, pray for the ones who don't. Life is too short to be anything but happy. Falling down is a part of life, getting back up is living."

  4. #14
    Super Member oldsewnsew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Springfield Oregon
    Posts
    1,436
    One thing I've seen is light bulb bases that actually touch metal in the socket. It still works, but a flipped plug makes the machine "hot". A higher resistance short thru oxide or grease or whatever will still cause a tingle. Just my 2 worth
    Jim

    "What do you mean worrying doesn't help? Everything I ever worried about...never happened!"
    quote by __________ I forget who.

  5. #15
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Corpus Christi, Tx.
    Posts
    7,548
    Blog Entries
    2
    I agree with Steve! I would think again about ever using that repairman. Evidently, he didn't check it before you picked it up. If you would've had a pacemaker in, it could've been a trip to the hospital. Happened to my aunt. Throught her pm out of whack and nearly cost her life.
    Quote Originally Posted by SteveH View Post
    I recommend that you do not use the machine until this is resolved.

    You DO sound like you have a short of some kind. Most likely a short to ground. (A wire or component that carries power is somehow touching the frame (ground) of the machine.

    The "tingle" is 110v gently running through your body...

    The "repair man" should have never let it leave his shop like that... PERIOD

  6. #16
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    San Lorenzo, CA
    Posts
    3,557
    Quote Originally Posted by buslady View Post
    ... I apologize if this has already been answered. When I have more time, I will go back and reread all the posts!! This is a great place when you need help. thank you sew much.
    You are welcome, and nothing to apologize for.
    Adding a "grounded" plug wire is possible, but probably not necessary.

    And my guess is that the issue would most likely be resolved in the rewiring process anyway regardless of the type of cord used.

    Just carefully check each connection, every place where the wire bends sharply, and any place where it goes through something. take pictures and post them if you are unsure of anything, we're here to help.

    EDIT: Good post Joe, excellent points to make!

  7. #17
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Central Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    2,580
    I truly think that in the cases where the buzzing stops when reorienting the cord that the "problem" has been temporarily disturbed. I suppose that it could be proven by putting a mark with a sharpie or something on the cord and seeing if the same way works every time, but I don't think it will. Here's why:
    Polarity results from the fact that an electrical circuit has a negative and a positive pole. Direct current (DC) flows in one direction, resulting in a constant polarity. Alternating current (AC) flows half the time in one direction and half the time in the other, changing its polarity 120 times per second with 60-hertz current.
    http://www.lincolnelectric.com/en-ca...ty-detail.aspx

    Therefore, which way a non-polarized plug is in the wall is less relevant than it seems at first.

    If you're getting a buzz, there's some electrical problem that needs to be addressed. The most likely place that your (hopefully former) repairman didn't check is at the backside of the male plug. That's the easiest place to overlook (It's accessed via the bottom of the machine under the "panel", or you can remove the screw on the outside of the plug and gently pull it outward a little), the easiest place to ground to the body of the machine, and the "hardest" to check - mostly because of clearances making it hard to maneuver. The process is easy.

    Slightly wet hands (just came back from the washroom? Have a little water on your hands from the glass of water beside you? Spilled coffee on yourself again - no wait. That one is me.), cuts, pacemakers, all of it can lead to a really bad situation when added to a machine that's causing a buzz, tingle or shock.

    I service enough machines that I know that there is liquid around machines quite often. I had coffee or tea to clean off the electronic machine I serviced yesterday, spilled all over the bed and allowed to dry!
    Tammi - I've found that many baby steps tend to get you further than a huge leap in followed by a huge leap out - http://www.archaicarcane.com
    Singer 411G, 301A, 2x 221 (featherweight), 222k - the holy grail, 99-, 15-90 Centennial, 27, VS2, 28 hc, 128 knee bar, 201-2, 31-15, Pfaff 130-6. Non-Vintage - Pfaff 6122, Kenmore (Janome) 385.81595 serger, Kenmore (Janome) 385.81155, 2013 APQS Lucey

  8. #18
    Super Member oldsewnsew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Springfield Oregon
    Posts
    1,436
    Yep. What Tammi said. Metal surfaces need to stay electrically isolated from either leg. Now Ive fiddled with some foot controls that were scary under the wrong circumstances
    Jim

    "What do you mean worrying doesn't help? Everything I ever worried about...never happened!"
    quote by __________ I forget who.

  9. #19
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Central Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    2,580
    Ahh. There it is. We talked about this a few months ago, which lead to the blog post I made on my site about electricity and vintage machines. Here's the original thread:
    Electrical "buzz" from my FW

    Jim, I think I've met some of those pedals too. I'm surprised more places didn't burn down and more people get electrocuted!
    Tammi - I've found that many baby steps tend to get you further than a huge leap in followed by a huge leap out - http://www.archaicarcane.com
    Singer 411G, 301A, 2x 221 (featherweight), 222k - the holy grail, 99-, 15-90 Centennial, 27, VS2, 28 hc, 128 knee bar, 201-2, 31-15, Pfaff 130-6. Non-Vintage - Pfaff 6122, Kenmore (Janome) 385.81595 serger, Kenmore (Janome) 385.81155, 2013 APQS Lucey

  10. #20
    Super Member buslady's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Thumb of Michigan
    Posts
    2,261
    Blog Entries
    7
    Thank you guys so much! I can't wait to tear into it first chance I get. I also have a white featherweight that seemed to overheat the last time I used it, so I have been afraid to do so. Been gonna tear it down and see if the motor needs new brushes. (watched a tutorial long time ago on that). I went to the site referenced above and bought the CD's since that is cheeper than sending even one of them in to the shop. My DH is very handy, I'll have him watch the CD's and see what he can do for it!! Thanks a bunch. Oh, the note in my case from the repair man was that he would suggest I replace the foot pedal, so maybe that is what he was thinking, but I don't know why we would just "suggest" since the reason I sent it to him was the "buzz". You would think he would just replace it. Who knows.
    Onalee Rose
    "There comes a time in your life, when you walk away from all the drama and people who create it. You surround yourself with people who make you laugh. Forget the bad, and focus on the good. Love the people who treat you right, pray for the ones who don't. Life is too short to be anything but happy. Falling down is a part of life, getting back up is living."

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.