Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 25 of 25

Thread: Electrical "buzz" from my FW

  1. #1
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Horse Country, FL
    Posts
    6,361
    Blog Entries
    1

    Electrical "buzz" from my FW

    I have had my FW since the late 1970's. Lately, when I touch the throat plate or hand wheel (both silver colored metal) I've gotten a slight "buzz." Now it seems to be affecting the bed extension, as well. Any recommendations on how to fix this problem? The plug is the original 2 prong. DH is fairly OK in the workshop. Any help is appreciated. Thanks!
    "A woman is like a tea bag-you can't tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water." Eleanor Roosevelt

  2. #2
    Super Member ArizonaKAT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    1,371
    Blog Entries
    1
    Sounds like the wiring is going bad. I understand it's not a difficult fix . . . but don't go by what I say. I have a 201 and 15-90 that are both in the process of rewire . . . and not complete yet.

  3. #3
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Sierra Vista, AZ
    Posts
    3,972
    Yes, sounds as if your machine is due for a rewire. Here is a link for good place to start.

    http://www.featherweight221.com/fwrx/index.html
    Sweet Caroline

  4. #4
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Horse Country, FL
    Posts
    6,361
    Blog Entries
    1
    Thanks! I didn't know of that problem, but don't regularly check this thread. I have the DVD from the link Caroline provided (thanks, much), so now I just have to FIND it! HA! Since I only paid $15 for the machine and another $15 to get it running, guess a rewire will be worth it.
    "A woman is like a tea bag-you can't tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water." Eleanor Roosevelt

  5. #5
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Maine-ly Florida
    Posts
    3,804
    I recently read something about the old foot pedals not being grounded. Might be a problem there. Do be careful.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    SW TN
    Posts
    588
    I have read of this problem on www.novamontgomery.com and it relates to the foot pedal. Please go to her site and you can find good reference material about this. If you can't find it, you can send her a message and she will direct you to the material. She will talk to you on phone and if needed y'all can Skype and work on the problem.

    Nova is a fantastic Featherweight source and I know you will be pleased with her input and love of our Featherweights. Other contact information is: [email protected] or (936) 577-4818.

    Please check out her information before opening up the foot pedal.

    I have no business affiliation with Nova nor do I receive payment for this referral.


    Linda

    Sew little time and sew many ideas

  7. #7
    Super Member purplefiend's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Round Rock,Texas
    Posts
    6,133
    Two places to check the wiring on a FW. Pull the male plug that's in the machine and check the wiring and also behind the light. This website is good. http://www.singer-featherweight.com/ also look at the site one page under "chamber of horrors", then in there: "electrical disasters".
    Sharon

  8. #8
    Senior Member vanginney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Saskatchewan
    Posts
    351
    Blog Entries
    11
    I had this happen on a white machine....very unnerving. I switched out the foot pedal and the buzzing stopped. It's a different color, but it doesn't bother me. Be careful!

  9. #9
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Horse Country, FL
    Posts
    6,361
    Blog Entries
    1
    Thanks for the help on this. Linda, I will check out the Nova site. I haven't sewn this week, but have my DMIL's FW and will try switching out the foot pedal to see if that works. DH read about rewiring and thinks he can handle it, but needs to find the grease and brushes. Imagine that would be on the singer site. Thanks again!!!!!!!!!
    "A woman is like a tea bag-you can't tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water." Eleanor Roosevelt

  10. #10
    Super Member cabbagepatchkid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    1,787
    Quote Originally Posted by linda faye View Post
    I have read of this problem on www.novamontgomery.com and it relates to the foot pedal. Please go to her site and you can find good reference material about this.

    Nova is a fantastic Featherweight source and I know you will be pleased with her input
    Thank you for sharing this website! She has lots of wonderful information about FW's. i'll have lots of good reading, today.

    One of the things that she mentioned was to turn the plug around. Plugs weren't polarized, years ago, so you can plug them into the socket any old way and simply turning it around can solve the tingling problem.

  11. #11
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Horse Country, FL
    Posts
    6,361
    Blog Entries
    1
    Turning the plug around solved the problem. Who would have thought? Now I need to go back in and read the "rest of the story." Thanks for the help! People on QB are just the best. :-)
    "A woman is like a tea bag-you can't tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water." Eleanor Roosevelt

  12. #12
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Northern CA near Sacramento
    Posts
    1,105
    Coopah,

    Sorry to be a little late on this subject.
    Any tingle is the sign of an electrical short. Unplug that machine and don't use it until the wiring has been checked out. It can be be very dangerous to continue using it as it is. The short maybe as simple as a single wire strand touching the body of the machine, but you don't know until it is checked out.
    I don't want you to be injured.

    Cathy


    Quote Originally Posted by coopah View Post
    Lately, when I touch the throat plate or hand wheel (both silver colored metal) I've gotten a slight "buzz." Now it seems to be affecting the bed extension, as well. Any recommendations on how to fix this problem? The plug is the original 2 prong. DH is fairly OK in the workshop. Any help is appreciated. Thanks!
    Cathy

    "Most sewing machine problems are due to the carbon based unit in the chair in front of the machine"

  13. #13
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    San Lorenzo, CA
    Posts
    5,320
    Short or bad ground, Cathy is 100%

    Electricity (and the Fire it can create) are too nasty to play with if you are not sure.

    "I" would not use the machine currently.

    (One of my buffers did this and it was a loose wire in the junction)

  14. #14
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Horse Country, FL
    Posts
    6,361
    Blog Entries
    1
    I hear you about not using the machine. Guess I'll get MIL's out. It's in nice condition, so hate to use it. Good to have a back-up. Thanks for the kind words and help. :-)
    "A woman is like a tea bag-you can't tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water." Eleanor Roosevelt

  15. #15
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Not Here
    Posts
    3,795
    Honestly, Coopah, as Steve and Cathy mention, this is not because the plug was plugged in wrong. I suspect the reason the problem went away when you unplugged and plugged it in the other way is that the wires that were shorting together were nudged apart by the movement, and are no longer shorting. This is a temporary condition, the cord or the wiring inside MUST be addressed for safety.

    The cords were not polarized in the past, because it was not the "standard" or the law. The reason it truly does not matter is that with alternating current - AC power - what's supplied by the power company to your house, there is no positive and negative, hence no right or wrong way to plug the cord in. (Also the reason a motor like this doesn't run in reverse if plugged in one way or the other, or if we switch the wires at the machine side.)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_polarity

    The other thing to note about AC power, is that it requires a very small amount of it to disrupt the human heart. Less than 1 amp. Your wall plug is likely capable of supplying between 15 and 20 of those amps.

    Typically, with 120volt service (what your wall plug is using, but not your dryer), you will be "thrown clear" in an electrocution situation, but it's still not good for your heart.

    This is not to be played with. I'm sorry to be sounding "doom and gloom" but it's dangerous to believe that which way you plug it in will make the difference. It would likely be mandatory to change a plug out to a polarized one if simply plugging it in "wrong" could cause electrocution and fires.

    Please examine the wiring inside the machine, at the points that were mentioned, and the cord as well, between the foot and the machine as well as from the machine to the wall, and let us know what you find.
    Last edited by ArchaicArcane; 06-16-2013 at 05:08 PM.

  16. #16
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Horse Country, FL
    Posts
    6,361
    Blog Entries
    1
    I hear you, Archaic. I'll use my MIL's nice FW until I can get the wiring in my old FW looked at. I'll post results, but probably that won't happen for awhile. :-( Meanwhile, it can sit unplugged somewhere safe. Thanks for the caution. It's good to have folks who watch out for others. :-)
    "A woman is like a tea bag-you can't tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water." Eleanor Roosevelt

  17. #17
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    San Lorenzo, CA
    Posts
    5,320
    wheew.... thank you.

  18. #18
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Northern CA near Sacramento
    Posts
    1,105
    Yes, thank you. Glad you'll be safe.

    Cathy



    Quote Originally Posted by coopah View Post
    I hear you, Archaic. I'll use my MIL's nice FW until I can get the wiring in my old FW looked at. I'll post results, but probably that won't happen for awhile. :-( Meanwhile, it can sit unplugged somewhere safe. Thanks for the caution. It's good to have folks who watch out for others. :-)
    Cathy

    "Most sewing machine problems are due to the carbon based unit in the chair in front of the machine"

  19. #19
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Not Here
    Posts
    3,795
    I should also mention that the singer bakelite foot pedal -can't- be wired in reverse.

    For example, you will notice that there is no mention of being careful which wire to put to which connector in either of these articles:
    http://blog.sew-classic.com/2010/01/...g-machine.aspx
    http://blog.sew-classic.com/2009/11/...r-control.aspx

    For the same reason as before - AC current doesn't have constant polarity. All a foot pedal does is break the power going to the motor and add in some sort of resistance to allow variability of speed.

  20. #20
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Horse Country, FL
    Posts
    6,361
    Blog Entries
    1
    OK, so Archaic, you're telling me that if the foot pedal is the problem, it's ka-put forever? Sorry, but I'm a bit of a dunce on the electric things. Just checking. If that's so, I'll need to find another pedal.
    "A woman is like a tea bag-you can't tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water." Eleanor Roosevelt

  21. #21
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Not Here
    Posts
    3,795
    Hi Coopah,

    I sincerely doubt that the foot pedal itself is your issue.

    I suspect, keep in mind, this is without seeing any photos or anything, that it's a bare / loose wire touching somewhere it shouldn't.

    This wire -could- be in the pedal, but if it is, it's likely to be the cord that's the issue. The cord is very easily replaced, as in the articles that I posted above. (Sew-Classic)

    Or it could be a heavily damaged connector, they often get broken putting the machine into the case.
    http://shop.sew-classic.com/Terminal...-SCE192797.htm

    -if- it's the cord set that has a broken wire, it's the easiest repair on the planet. Anyone can do it. It's not the delicate operation that someone on some site said it is. That's what I was saying by posting the links. It's a simple job, and as I talked about, AC current isn't concerned about which wire you put where in this cord, so if you can manage a screwdriver, and take it "slowly" the first time, your FW doesn't necessarily need to go on the shelf.

    If you want a foot pedal that doesn't get warm when you use it, especially for slow sewing, then yes, change the pedal.

    I think it's theoretically possible to have the pedal an issue IF the cushions on the bottom of the pedal are missing and IF the cushion screws were sticking out and touching metal or the water that someone mentions in a tip of the month somewhere, and IF there was something wrong inside the pedal causing that screw to be touching part of the mechanism that's carrying power. I really doubt that perfect storm is happening in your pedal. Again, assuming without pics.

    I think it's far more likely that the thumbnuts where you connect the cord to the machine - the ones that you see when you turn the machine over to oil / grease the bottom - are hiding some bad wiring, or that the cord has cracks in it, and the wires are shorting.

    My suspicion is that it's here, because usually it's got to be "touching" the item it's using for ground (in this case, the body of the machine), which is what's giving you the "buzz"

    We've been looking at Alyce's pedal here: http://www.quiltingboard.com/vintage...p-t223839.html

    If you look at her excellent photo, you'll see the cordset at the top of the photo, attached to 2 screws. That's it. That's all that's required to change this cord. The hardest part is routing the new cord so it sits flat.

    The cord can be had from Sew-Classic (http://shop.sew-classic.com/Cord-Set...ers-SCE123.htm), or from Glenn Williams (I noticed you're in Florida, he is too - http://pages.suddenlink.net/joyof301s/glenn.htm (Number 15) and his cord is less money than Jenny's (SC) and I've dealt with him. He's good stuff.)

    I think best case scenario is that it's the cord. Then you have 2 options, in the short term, you can use the cord from MILs machine with yours, preserving her machine if you'd like (though I'd say run hers periodically anyway, or when you decide to use it down the road, it may want more TLC than just a light oiling), or you can replace the cord (an $8 - $10.29 item)

    I suspect though that the issue is at the machine side. Here's why: The last machine I serviced for a cord / pedal issue, the symptom was "machine went berserk, I had to unplug it to stop it" - the same thing that Alyce complained of. Most often, a short between the machine and the pedal manifests this way. Yours could be the exception though.

    I am going to make a suggestion - if this machine goes on the shelf, put a note with it, saying that it needs some electrical work. Better still if you know what it is, mention that too, or at least that it's a shocking little thing. This way, down the road, if the machine goes to someone else without being fixed, they don't have to relearn what you have here

    Whew!! Another novel! Sorry about that. I should just write a book and have done with it.

  22. #22
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Horse Country, FL
    Posts
    6,361
    Blog Entries
    1
    Wow! That's a lot of good information! Company left today, so maybe we can have a serious "look-see" this weekend and figure out the problem. Yes, you probably should write the book, but I'm sure glad to have you helping with this! This machine is the one I take on travels and such. It has had some repairs you wouldn't believe and we were told would probably not work, but my Dad did the repairs and he's gone now, so this is my favorite machine for many reasons. Anyways, we'll look and see if we can figure out the exact problem. Thanks for the "book!"
    "A woman is like a tea bag-you can't tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water." Eleanor Roosevelt

  23. #23
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Not Here
    Posts
    3,795
    Good Job Coopah. Please keep us up to date as to what you find!

    What sort of repairs were done previously?

  24. #24
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Horse Country, FL
    Posts
    6,361
    Blog Entries
    1
    Repairs? Not many as this little machine just keeps going and going! My Dad bought it at a flea market in the early 70's for $15. For another $15 it was serviced and came home stitching just great. That was a lot of money to me back then when I had $12 left to save or spend at the end of a month. Anyways, it has had the normal "check ups" except for the time it fell off a table and broke the thread up take arm. (The part that goes up and down with the thread to the needle.) So we took it to the sewing machine place and asked them about fixing it. They would charge $100 for the part (late 70's/early 80's) and I've forgotten how much to install the part and make it run correctly. So Dad asked about brazing the part. The repairman just looked at him like he was a crazy-man, but said, well, if you can do that, it probably won't work right because it has to be lined up just right to work. HA! So Dad did it and it is still working! Now the brazed part doesn't look beautiful except to me, because it shows the love of a Dad and the "can do" attitude he had. If Dad were still here, he'd be checking out this short, but I know I need to do it and will. :-) Thanks for your help.
    "A woman is like a tea bag-you can't tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water." Eleanor Roosevelt

  25. #25
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Not Here
    Posts
    3,795
    That's a wonderful story Coopah! Honestly, in a lot of cases, especially where there's actual skill involved, you can do a lot with the existing parts. Sounds like you dad was really talented, and a great problem solver.

    I will watch for your reply and see if we can't get you sorted out so you can continue using that little machine.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.