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Thread: Vintage Sewing Machine Shop.....Come on in and sit a spell

  1. #33631
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sew wishful View Post
    My friend just purchased her first vintage machine...a Universal Japanese clone. Serial #Z77218 Can someone give a date? She plugged it in last night and sparks flew!! She asked me to look at it. Bare wires coming out of the motor and then black tape to the plug in end to the machine case, about 8 inches long. I've never done any motor rewiring. Is there a tutorial for this, or do I need a more experienced person to work on it? Any help would be deeply appreciated!
    sew wishful,

    Easy way: Go to Sew-Classic { http://shop.sew-classic.com/ } and buy a replacement motor with bracket. It will bolt right on and plug right into the cord block.

    Less easy way:

    Go to a hardware store and buy some 18 ga SPT-1 wireing. If you get the SPT-2 you might have trouble fitting the wire through the motor. The SPT-1 or 2 refers to the thickness of the insulation. For a better tutorial on it, go to Sew-Classic and go to the section for bulk wire. She has a lot of information in there.

    >Take the motor off of the machine, remove the bracket and pulley.
    There will be a way to separate the motor halfs. Either screws from the outside going into a bracket or a long bolt with nuts on it or ????. You just have to look for them.
    >Before you split the motor, remove the brush caps and the springs and brushes.
    >Then since the wire is already bad, cut it off just outside the motor housing.
    >Then split the housing and carefully take it apart.

    >Once apart you'll find the main shaft with the commutator (where the brushes contact the armature) possibly some little thrust washers and lots of crud.

    >Also follow the old wires to where they are soldered onto the outer wirings. These have to be un-soldered and the new wires soldered on.
    That is the hardest part to this job.

    >The second hardest part is cleaning the motor of all the crud.
    > Clean the glaze off of the commutator, I use 600 grit sandpaper wrapped around a popsicle stick. I don't cut into the copper, I just clean it.
    Clean the brush areas, make sure the springs are good. Clean the caps. They are probably Bakelite so will be fragile and brittle.

    Now, once it's cleaned inside and out, and the new wires are soldered in you have to reassemble it.
    The armature goes in first, one way or the other. Then depending on which end of the case the wires come out of you have to guide them out through the hole. Now, usually there is a knot tied in the wire to prevent it from being yanked out and damaging the connections inside. I'm horrible with knots but I do it as small as I can. If your lucky there might be a stress relief part passing through the hole around the wire. If that is there you'll see it when you're taking apart. Just put it back in the way it came out.
    Finish assembling the motor making sure the wires don't get in the way of the armature on the insides and the brushes line up too.

    The motor will need some oil so do that too. Don't flood it though.

    Put the plug on it and plug it in. If you've done it right, it will run just fine. If not, well try again or refer to the easy way above.

    This is basically what I do. I hope I haven't been to vague.

    Joe
    Last edited by J Miller; 04-17-2012 at 03:44 PM.

  2. #33632
    Super Member Crossstitcher's Avatar
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    Julie, so glad you got your machine back. Hope to see what you have made real soon.
    Quilting with a friend keeps me in stitches.

    Trish

  3. #33633
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
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    It sounds like Universal cords have similar issues. Mine did and and I have read of another. My motor cord was bare, but the other cords are still good. I got it apart and decided it was beyond my capabilities - not the right tools for a confined area, so I took it to my large appliance repairman. He rewired and cleaned for his bench fee of $35 - maybe close to price of a new one, but I needed the bright turquoise housing. He had never done a SM, but felt that a motor is a motor and was quite willing to have at it.

  4. #33634
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    I have read that a lot of the old wiring has insulation made from latex. I have personally seen this stuff chemically deteriorate and melt while sitting in the case. My Hother motor did that.
    The wiring in many of these old 40s and 50s machines is aluminum. AL is a good conductor of electricity but it expands and contracts due to heat when in use and it will corrode at the drop of the hat.

    So replacing the old wiring is a good thing to do.

    Joe

  5. #33635
    Senior Member sew wishful's Avatar
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    Thanks so much, Joe and Irishrose! I'm thinking this is beyond me, or at least beyond my toolbox. I'm going to carry the motor in to show her today, and let her decide. Anyone have an approximate price of a new motor from Sew-Classic? Since this machine is all so nice...no wear marks at all...all of the gold is pristine, I'm thinking that is exactly what happened, Joe...the wiring just disintegrated! My friend sewed with it the other night just to be sure it worked. I wouldn't have even plugged it in! I may ask the maintenance department to have a look and get an opinion from them. Pretty small motor for them, tho. LOL! Maybe I'll offer to buy the machine from my friend for what she paid and then do what I think should be done. New motor! Thank you again!
    And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love Him, who have been called according to His purpose. Romans 8:28


    Randa

  6. #33636
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sew wishful View Post
    Thanks so much, Joe and Irishrose! I'm thinking this is beyond me, or at least beyond my toolbox. I'm going to carry the motor in to show her today, and let her decide. Anyone have an approximate price of a new motor from Sew-Classic? Since this machine is all so nice...no wear marks at all...all of the gold is pristine, I'm thinking that is exactly what happened, Joe...the wiring just disintegrated! My friend sewed with it the other night just to be sure it worked. I wouldn't have even plugged it in! I may ask the maintenance department to have a look and get an opinion from them. Pretty small motor for them, tho. LOL! Maybe I'll offer to buy the machine from my friend for what she paid and then do what I think should be done. New motor! Thank you again!
    Maybe we can sweet talk Joe into doing a tutorial with LOTS of pictures - I bet your maintenance man wouldn't even blink. There are small motor repair shops still around maybe they would tackle it. Sew-classic does have a motor you can swap on there - probably not as heavy duty.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  7. #33637
    Senior Member sew wishful's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by miriam View Post
    Maybe we can sweet talk Joe into doing a tutorial with LOTS of pictures - I bet your maintenance man wouldn't even blink. There are small motor repair shops still around maybe they would tackle it. Sew-classic does have a motor you can swap on there - probably not as heavy duty.
    I checked the motors from sew classic and they aren't the same volts and watts. Does that matter? If her price is pretty much the normal, I'll just switch them out. That's pretty reasonable! Ya' know....I took a motor off the machine I turned into a handcrank...what did I do with it??? Off to the hunt!!
    And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love Him, who have been called according to His purpose. Romans 8:28


    Randa

  8. #33638
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sew wishful View Post
    I checked the motors from sew classic and they aren't the same volts and watts. Does that matter? If her price is pretty much the normal, I'll just switch them out. That's pretty reasonable! Ya' know....I took a motor off the machine I turned into a handcrank...what did I do with it??? Off to the hunt!!
    he he - nope size doesn't matter - that other motor should work if the wires, etc are ok
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  9. #33639
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    The motors Sew-Classic sells are made by, or at least labeled by, Alphasew. They are generally .9 Amp motors and do run quite well. I have ....... oh five or six of them on my machines.
    My HOTHER has one on it and I'm sewing through two layers of thick vinyl. All are 110-125 V US household electrical compatible.

    The one you would need for your machine is:
    http://shop.sew-classic.com/Motor-Ne...s-SCE35L09.htm
    And Sew-Classic is selling those for $23.95 + shipping.

    .................................................. .........................................

    I'll gladly do the motor re-wire pictorial, but it will have to wait until I find a donor motor and I get a few projects that are pending finished.

    Joe

  10. #33640
    Super Member jljack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    .................................................. .........................................

    I'll gladly do the motor re-wire pictorial, but it will have to wait until I find a donor motor and I get a few projects that are pending finished.

    Joe
    Hey Joe....I have an old motor that needs rewiring that you could use to do the tutorial. Would you consider doing it for me?

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