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Thread: Weird question - Singer handwheels

  1. #1
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    Weird question - Singer handwheels

    OK, so my first vintage machine (Betty) was / is a 1913 model 27 (looks like a 127, but it's got weird early features and ISMACS says it's a 27). Her handwheel (spoked) is very rusty and in need of a lot of TLC.

    Fast forward about 10 years. I get a "parts" 127, and the spoked handwheel is in better shape than Betty's. Perfect, right?

    It doesn't fit! The "new" handwheel seems to be a little deeper than the original, and it's just enough that the stop motion washer doesn't seat properly, and so of course nothing goes together quite right.

    My first instinct was to "hollow" it out a little because I could see the difference, but I think I would have to deal with a lot of rust if I did that, or would I? It does look like that part is basically raw metal, but I'm a little baffled as to why the discrepancy...

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    Betty's original hand wheel is on the top, the replacement one on the bottom. The part with the arrows is one of two things I can see that are different, (the flange after the belt groove itself seems a smidge thicker on the replacement one, as well as the groove (with the arrows) being shallower but I haven't taken calipers to the rest of the wheel yet.

    What would you do?
    Tammi - I've found that many baby steps tend to get you further than a huge leap in followed by a huge leap out - http://www.archaicarcane.com
    Singer 431G, 411G, 503J, 301A, 2x 221 (featherweight), 222k - the holy grail, 99k, 99, 115, 15-90 Centennial, 27, VS2, 28 hc, 128 knee bar, 201-2, Ultralock 14u64a (Serger), Pfaff 130-6, and a Kangaroo coming Nov 2013.

  2. #2
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    I would throw that first hand wheel in some Evap-o-rust over night. Then I would polish it up with the dremmel tool wire brush. Then I would polish that thing with some metal polish. Nope it won't be chrome but it would look fairly nice. I did that on a Singer 66 - right now I can't find the belt guard for it. It disappeared off the bench - maybe it went on one I sold - I did mess around with one the other week.....
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    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal.
    It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  3. #3
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
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    I agree with Miriam, I would put the original one in evaporust then polish the thing with a cup wire brush on a dremel. Polish first with fine steel wool and Brasso, then polish with brasso and a soft rag. It will take time and work but it will shine almost like chrome. I have been know to use fine wet or dry sandpaper with kerosene to some things out before polishing.
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    Glenn W. Cleveland

  4. #4
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Another tip for polishing the hand wheel. Get the machine set up and get it going. A rotating hand wheel is easier to polish.

    Joe

  5. #5
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    Another tip for polishing the hand wheel. Get the machine set up and get it going. A rotating hand wheel is easier to polish.

    Joe
    Good idea Joe, I do this also but did not mention it. glad you did.
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    Glenn W. Cleveland

  6. #6
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone! I have EvapoRust here, but have never had an opportunity to use it ( no lack of projects, just a lack of time). Overnight, eh? I will maybe put a tub of it in the oven for the night one day this weekend (I know it says that it's "Safe", but my kitters are not the smartest )

    I noticed on the label is said to clean it up then to dip it and let it air dry. Is this a lasting treatment? I don't have to worry about putting her away and then finding her rusted as bad or worse than before?

    I like that tip Joe, I can see how that would be a time saver, or at the least a sanity saver.

    In other news, I oiled up the "parts machine", she turns beautifully now, but the carriage that holds the shuttle is bent, so the shuttle flops around. I know someone who's just enamored with the Variable shuttles and loves machines with stories and battle scars. This lady has both so I will gift it to him as a display piece.
    Tammi - I've found that many baby steps tend to get you further than a huge leap in followed by a huge leap out - http://www.archaicarcane.com
    Singer 431G, 411G, 503J, 301A, 2x 221 (featherweight), 222k - the holy grail, 99k, 99, 115, 15-90 Centennial, 27, VS2, 28 hc, 128 knee bar, 201-2, Ultralock 14u64a (Serger), Pfaff 130-6, and a Kangaroo coming Nov 2013.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by ArchaicArcane View Post
    Thanks everyone! I have EvapoRust here, but have never had an opportunity to use it ( no lack of projects, just a lack of time). Overnight, eh? I will maybe put a tub of it in the oven for the night one day this weekend (I know it says that it's "Safe", but my kitters are not the smartest )

    I noticed on the label is said to clean it up then to dip it and let it air dry. Is this a lasting treatment? I don't have to worry about putting her away and then finding her rusted as bad or worse than before?

    I like that tip Joe, I can see how that would be a time saver, or at the least a sanity saver.

    In other news, I oiled up the "parts machine", she turns beautifully now, but the carriage that holds the shuttle is bent, so the shuttle flops around. I know someone who's just enamored with the Variable shuttles and loves machines with stories and battle scars. This lady has both so I will gift it to him as a display piece.
    Is it odd that the hand wheels are different? I don't have enough experience to know, but it seems odd to me.

    I remember reading on the Evaporust website that if you don't dip it in fresh solution the iron oxides in the first solution (from the rust that was removed) will cause the item to rust. A thin coating of clean evaporust will protect it for a short time (a week or two? not sure.) BUT I don't do this. I just rinse off the evaporust with water and proceed. It seems too much trouble and waste of product to dip it in clean solution. Once the rust is gone and the solution is rinsed off and the item is dried thoroughly, it's just like any other steel item. I am very nervous using water around steel so I dry thoroughly with towels and if the thing has crevices I blast it with the hair dryer, then I oil it or put some WD40 on it immediately (gasp! WD40 only if there aren't any moving parts). Sometimes I put alcohol on it after I rinse with water, just to displace some water and help the thing dry faster.
    Sheila

  8. #8
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Put the HW and it's clutch knob and the nose plate and the circle thingy in a zip bag and put a layer of E-O-R on it for over night. It will turn dark but the rust should be gone. Then wipe things off good and give it a brushing with the dremmel cup brush. Then polish it all up. Nothing has re-rusted so far. Maybe car wax would protect it some. I put a few drops of oil on the inside of the wheel and spread it around. There are other rust cleaners but Evap-O-Rust seems to be the bomb.
    I am hoping to find before pics...
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    Last edited by miriam; 11-14-2013 at 01:28 AM.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal.
    It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  9. #9
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    I keep thinking about a tutorial but I've been crazy busy... well mostly - when I'm not making a Crush and Sow.
    Glenn was here and we fixed up that Singer 66 - note the machine's finish looks a lot better, too.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal.
    It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  10. #10
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    Nice transformation!
    Is it necessary to de-rust the handwheel if you're going to wire-brush it anyway?
    Sheila

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