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Thread: heres a weird question

  1. #1
    Super Member sahm4605's Avatar
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    I had run out of starch yesterday and my mom was out and bringing me some fleece fabric to play around with. Well I asked her if she could pick me up some starch, well she got me this stuff called magic sizing and it is the light formula. should I even bother using it? I saturated some fabric with it and ironed it out and the feel isn't that crisp.
    now what is the difference between sizing and starch? and are they pretty much the same or are they really different? I am at a loss as to what to do with it.

  2. #2
    Super Member raptureready's Avatar
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    It's spray starch and isn't all that great. You can go ahead and use it. I'd use it on the underneath side because sometimes it will get flaky on you. Because it's the light formula it won't get the crispness that you may be wanting. Personally I like Mary Ellen's Best Spray starch

  3. #3
    Super Member oatw13's Avatar
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    In my experience, sizing will prevent the fabric from pulling or stretching, but it will not get the "crispness" you may associate with starch. If you don't think it is "crisp" enough after ironing, simply apply another coat. Eventually you will begin to feel the stiffness.

  4. #4
    Super Member BKrenning's Avatar
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    I like to use sizing on light colored fabrics because I'm not patient enough for the starch to setup and end up scorching it. The sizing doesn't have the scorch problem. It doesn't get nearly as stiff as starch but it will hold the fabric in shape as well as starch.

  5. #5
    Junior Member quiltaholic's Avatar
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    Magic Sizing is actually better for your fabrics because it does not have the corn starch or flour in it that starch has. It's actually used by the manufacturing industry when fabric is made. This came from an article in one of the quilting magazines not long ago. I wish I could remember which one.

  6. #6
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    I do embroidery and have found that the t-shirts I get will show marks from my hoop where the sizing is displaced in the cloth while I sew. I use the magic sizing to put the color back and take away the hoop burn. I would probably not use it as a starch because it is so much lighter than starch.

  7. #7
    Member elkridgequilter's Avatar
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    I like Magic Sizing if I just want a little body. If I want more (like when I have bias edges) I use MaryEllen's Best Press.

  8. #8
    dungeonquilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oatw13
    In my experience, sizing will prevent the fabric from pulling or stretching, but it will not get the "crispness" you may associate with starch. If you don't think it is "crisp" enough after ironing, simply apply another coat. Eventually you will begin to feel the stiffness.
    I agree with this, just keep spraying and it will eventually you will begin to feel the stiffness (use it all the time whether it is right or wrong....each to our own likeness

  9. #9
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    there is quite a difference between sizing and starch. i use both regularly; the sizing does not add 'crispness', the sizing adds body to a fabric most fabrics we buy have sizing added to it, that's what we wash out when we pre-wash our fabrics so you can put it back. starch adds the crispness, but if you do not want it 'crisp' use the sizing.

  10. #10
    Moderator sharon b's Avatar
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    Always wondered what the difference was... now I know :thumbup: THANKS for the info :lol:

  11. #11
    Super Member jljack's Avatar
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    It will work fine. It doesn't flake as much for me as starch does. There is really no difference in how it affects the fabric...both make it stiffer.

  12. #12
    thismomquilts's Avatar
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    I used to use Magic Sizing - Now I buy liquid starch and add water - it lasts WAY longer in the bottle than spray starch and it's MUCH, MUCH cheaper

  13. #13
    Super Member ConnieF's Avatar
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    Yes Many times better than the starch... I always use sizing unless I want something stiff.

  14. #14
    Super Member sahm4605's Avatar
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    I have used it on the quilt that I am getting ready to finish peicing together, it is actually my avatar quilt. I soaked it in the sizing and then let it sit for about an hour on the ironing board. used my iron with steam on high and it is really crisp. just about as crisp as when i used the starch. I think that it is just about how soaked you make the fabric and how long you let it dry. but that is just me. I would rather find the cheapest way to stiffen my fabric and will try the liquid starch and water. Thanks for all the info everyone.

  15. #15

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    My understanding is that starch is for cottons and sizing is for blends, i.e., polyester blends, rayon, etc. Don't know where this info came from, but it has worked well for me over the years. Have used sizing in a pinch on cotton, but it definitely is lighter duty.

  16. #16
    Super Member cwessel47's Avatar
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    What am I missing here? I have been quilting for 35 years and I have never used either product. Don't have a clue. Why would I want to use it? Crispness? I guess I just don't need it - which is "less expensive" (let's not say cheap around here) than the other choices.

  17. #17
    Super Member sahm4605's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cwessel47
    What am I missing here? I have been quilting for 35 years and I have never used either product. Don't have a clue. Why would I want to use it? Crispness? I guess I just don't need it - which is "less expensive" (let's not say cheap around here) than the other choices.
    OMG!!! you should grab a can of starch and try it on one of your projects. You will never go back. it keeps the fabric from pulling or stretching when you are cutting and sewing. i have made a purse with starch and with out and I will never go back to not using starch. it is crazy awesome.

  18. #18
    Super Member C.Cal Quilt Girl's Avatar
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    Will have to try Thanks for the tip :)

  19. #19
    mlaceruby's Avatar
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    I always use the sizing.
    get it cheap at sam's club
    4 big cans for under $4 and that lasts me a long time

  20. #20
    Super Member sahm4605's Avatar
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    ooooooooooooo!!! mlaceruby, i will deffinatly have to look into sams club. maybe costco has some too.

  21. #21
    reach for the stars 2's Avatar
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    I too always wonder know I know also.

  22. #22
    Super Member mimiknoxtaylor's Avatar
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    you can make your own starch with just cornstarch & water. Go to ehow.com and do a search. I have the info taped inside a cabinet in my laundry room. It's easy & quick using the microwave.

  23. #23
    Super Member Tiffany's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raptureready
    It's spray starch and isn't all that great. You can go ahead and use it. I'd use it on the underneath side because sometimes it will get flaky on you. Because it's the light formula it won't get the crispness that you may be wanting. Personally I like Mary Ellen's Best Spray starch
    If your starch flakes on you, give it an extra minute to soak into the fabric after you spray it on and before you iron. The flakes are caused by the starch sitting on top of the fabric instead of soaking in. I had a teacher share this with me when she watched me starching in class and dealing with the flakes. I was surprised at what a difference it made.

    Quote Originally Posted by quiltaholic
    Magic Sizing is actually better for your fabrics because it does not have the corn starch or flour in it that starch has. It's actually used by the manufacturing industry when fabric is made. This came from an article in one of the quilting magazines not long ago. I wish I could remember which one.
    WHAT!?! :shock: I've got Celiac and I'm allergic to corn so I've been making my own starch, which is quite a pain in the butt. If you remember where the article on this was, please let me know. Now I need to go buy some Magic Sizing!

  24. #24
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    I'm with you...sort of. I do use spray sizing to prepare applique pieces for hand sewing but not for machine piecing. If I wanted to work with something as stiff as a board I would go into woodworking. And, right or wrong, it has been said for years that starch attracts bugs but sizing doesn't.
    Quote Originally Posted by cwessel47
    What am I missing here? I have been quilting for 35 years and I have never used either product. Don't have a clue. Why would I want to use it? Crispness? I guess I just don't need it - which is "less expensive" (let's not say cheap around here) than the other choices.

  25. #25
    Super Member mar32428's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ckcowl
    there is quite a difference between sizing and starch. i use both regularly; the sizing does not add 'crispness', the sizing adds body to a fabric most fabrics we buy have sizing added to it, that's what we wash out when we pre-wash our fabrics so you can put it back. starch adds the crispness, but if you do not want it 'crisp' use the sizing.
    Please explain why we wash our fabric to get the sizing out and then spray it back in. Only time I wash fabric is for clothes and then very seldom even then.

    I like the sizing for a stabilizer and the starch for stiffness

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