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Thread: "conventional" spelling

  1. #1
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    "conventional" spelling

    It evolves and changes -

    I wonder what it will be like twenty years from now?

  2. #2
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    I remember, way back when I was in collage, I had a job interview. I could not remember if I interviewed with Mrs. Grey, or Mrs. Gray. I really fretted over that thank you. I must have guessed correctly, because I got the job.

    But, no, I don't think we will ever have consistent rules. Our language is so influenced by our ancestors, who came from many countries.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by quilt1950 View Post
    I remember, way back when I was in collage, I had a job interview. I could not remember if I interviewed with Mrs. Grey, or Mrs. Gray. I really fretted over that thank you.
    I trust you used school paste for your collage and were able to easily pry yourself loose.

    But seriously... the focus today seems more about making an impression in a vast sea of written messages than about being correct. I predict that gimmicks will continue to increase - they have the added advantage of disguising incompetent grammar.

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    You really can't expect very much from people who are in the very same room and send text messages back and forth to each other.
    Fabric is like money, no matter how much you have it's never enough.

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    It seems to me that grammatical usage and "proper" English have gone by the wayside. I laughingly say that I am probably one of three people in the world who still cares about not splitting an infinitive. I taught four rules in my grammar classes for many years: 1) language changes; 2) change in language is a natural thing; 3) usage is relative; and, 4) usage is determined by an educated majority. I sometimes wonder where the educated majority is hiding. It really saddens me to see language totally dominated with LOL, OMG, etc., when we have such beautiful words we could/should be using.
    Last edited by youngduncan; 10-06-2015 at 03:14 AM. Reason: Grammar!!
    Sometimes I try to act "normal," but it gets boring so I just go back to being myself.

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    It seems to me a lot of the "proper" English that is getting lost is the ability to speak without half of the sentence is swearing.

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    Power Poster ManiacQuilter2's Avatar
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    I have a letter that my Great grandfather wrote when my grandmother was a child. Writing has certainly evolved along with the dictionary.
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    Oh, for another William F. Buckley! His use of the English was impeccable!

  9. #9
    Super Member sparkys_mom's Avatar
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    I know language and spelling have always evolved and always will. Still, it drives me up the wall to get an email that says something like "r u going to the movie?".
    Pat

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    ***
    *** I just wonder if the kids today know how (or will ever know how)
    *** to spell properly after using all the short cuts and abbreviations on their cell phones.
    ***
    *** Blows my old 69 year old mind with some of them.
    ***
    *** I guess I am now hip (or is that obsolete too)?
    ***
    J J (jbj137)

    I am a G.R.I.T.
    G = girl R =raised I = in T = the S = South

  11. #11
    Super Member Evie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by carolynjo View Post
    Oh, for another William F. Buckley! His use of the English was impeccable!
    And President Carter is another great linguist.
    "I keep my end tables full of needlework and quilting so I don't have to dust them." ~ Author Unknown but I agree!

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    I spoke with a client about selling his home. He had interviewed more than just one. His deciding factor was through a text message he sent to the different agents. He asked for a reply via text. He replied to mine and stated he was happy that just because the reply was to be in text, I didn't use text short hand. I actually texted the complete and accurately spelled words.
    Quote Originally Posted by sparkys_mom View Post
    I know language and spelling have always evolved and always will. Still, it drives me up the wall to get an email that says something like "r u going to the movie?".

  13. #13
    Super Member crafty pat's Avatar
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    My DGD started kindergarten this year and my DD had her placed in one class where half the class spoke only English and half only Spanish. Being taught both in both languages is supposed to teach them to speak both languages. DD went to pick up DGD and wanted to see how she was doing and the poor teacher was about to pull her hair out. She told her most of the Mexican children didn't even speak good Spanish and over half of the American kids didn't speak good English. How sad not to start your children out speaking the right way from the start.

  14. #14
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    And, like, to complicate things, like, we have this, like, overused word!! I guess our ancestors probably complained about the same thing long before our time.
    Alyce

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    I didn't allow my kids to say ain't or say the days of the week by saying Mondee, Tuesdee, the ending is DAY. They may have answered with a 'naw' or 'yeah' one time to me. It's no or yes preferably with a mam or sir at the end. I got a tongue lashing by my sixth grade teacher in front of the whole class for saying wuz instead of was. I was humiliated but never forgot to pronounce my words carefully. I asked a classmate years later about the incident and she didn't even remember it and she sit next to me. LOL. It sure taught me a lesson. I think speaking words correctly is more important then how a word is spelled.
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  16. #16
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    Sometimes I know how a word is spelled from reading it - but I do not know how it should be pronounced.

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    ..I am adamant about using correct grammar.....my daughters are adults, as are grandchildren....now working on greats.....same rules...no "ain't", hey, she/he - s/b mom, dad, Nannie, and the new one " dude"-- from 4 yr old ggs..to me--"hi dude!" He got an earful after that greeting....since then it's hi Nannie.....much of the bad grammar is picked up.once the children are in school--- from other students......an ongoing battle.....and of course..ever standing rule...no cussing in my house...and all abide by it.....

  18. #18
    Senior Member ladydukes's Avatar
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    Remember when words had double L's in them, like CANCELLED, now it is CANCELED. Same for quite a few other words...

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    I drive DH mad when I find all the grammatical errors in printed material -- not just newspapers, but commercial mailings, etc. Some of it may be finger-slip typos, but I think much is a complete ignorance of grammar and spelling. I have been known to stop reading a book that uses "alright" instead of "all right."

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    I'm a retired English, Spanish, and French teacher, so I'm very familiar with the fact that languages change and evolve, with the most common words, especially the verbs, showing the most changes. I think that being able to cross from one language to another, whether it's English to French or standard to very colloquial, keeps the brain active. Youngduncan's remark about split infinitives reminds me that, in trying to avoid splitting an infinitive, one does almost mental gymnastics to reframe the sentence to make it not only grammatically correct, but also more free-flowing. That's what really concerns me about the current trends among teenagers: they spend so much time learning the "latest" way to speak and to write that they don't master the standard language. I have 5 grandsons, aged 3-16, and am constantly delighted when they use elevated words like "actually, nevertheless, complicated, interestingly, etc." at very young ages. It shows that their parents talk to them constantly, which is great for creating family bonds and just as fine for letting little minds absorb language.

  21. #21
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    The main purpose of language is an attempt to communicate with others.

    I did use the word "attempt" deliberately.

    There are so many opportunities for "slippage/misunderstandings" in even a "simple" exchange or statement.

    Some causes for "slippage":

    Impaired hearing -
    Not listening carefully or paying attention - only getting enough of the statement to get it garbled
    Different backgrounds and education levels -

    I do think that English, USA version, is difficult to learn. It is so inconsistent in the spelling and pronunciation "guides" - "rules" does not seem to be an appropriate word for them! - that I think it is a wonder that anyone learns it!

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    And how about the word 'said'? "He asked me a question and I like 'yes' " You didn't 'like' anything, you SAID something. Or "Grandma was in the kitchen and fell to the ground"...So, was she outside in an outdoor kitchen, or did she really fall to the floor? My favorites (not), the mix up between your and you're, there and their and they're, then and than; I see these errors almost daily in professional publications. Drives me nuts.

  23. #23
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    I am wondering if - in 20 years or so -

    "lite" will be standard spelling for "light"
    "u" will be standard for "you"
    "ur" will be standard for "your"

    etc.

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