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Thread: Home Ec Projects

  1. #1
    Super Member Ps 150's Avatar
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    Home Ec Projects

    Hi, I'm a homeschooler and have been sewing with my daughters for years, so I have their sewing classes down. The tricky part is that I have a terrible black thumb. So, my DD's BFF's mom, who is a great gardener is going to teach my girls how to garden and I will teach her teenaged daughter how to sew. I want to teach her lessons that encompass many aspects of sewing, not just garments and quilts. I want to use lessons with applique and how to use fusibles, maybe do a few bags and things like that. So far I've come up with:

    *An advent calendar wall hanging that uses applique, straight line quilting and hand sewing.
    *A snowman ornament that teaches hand sewing and the blanket stitch.
    *Embroidering a pre-printed block to teach hand embroidery.
    *Making an apron with machine embroidered name on the front.
    *Making a pillow with a Christmas Tree on the front to teach sewing with ribbons and machine sewing buttons onto fabric.

    As you can see, I'm trying to come up with projects that will teach a few techniques per project. She has VERY limited sewing experience. Any thoughts?
    "Love is not love which alters when it alteration finds, or bends with the remover to remove."

  2. #2
    Super Member Crqltr's Avatar
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    Pillow cases and pj bottoms are always fun and easy...

  3. #3
    Super Member SewExtremeSeams's Avatar
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    Great idea. How about little zippered purses to learn how to put in zippers. There are several levels of zippers you could extend to from just a simple zippered coin purse.

    I homeschooled for 17+ years and my friends and I co taught each others' kids too. It created a lot of fun and expanded their skills.

    Linda

    Amazing Grace, how sweet the sound, that saved a wretch like me. I once was lost but now am found, was blind, but now I see.
    [John Newton (1725-1807)]

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  4. #4
    Super Member SewExtremeSeams's Avatar
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    I was just looking at this post and thought you might find some ideas to build sewing skills using this person's tutorials.

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/links-r...e-t257000.html

    Linda

    Amazing Grace, how sweet the sound, that saved a wretch like me. I once was lost but now am found, was blind, but now I see.
    [John Newton (1725-1807)]

    http://sewextremeseams.blogspot.com/

  5. #5
    Power Poster lynnie's Avatar
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    when you're done with her, she'll e an expert. Lucky her to have you as a teacher
    put off till tomorrow what you can do today, and if you procrastinate long enough, you may never have to do it.

  6. #6
    Power Poster lynnie's Avatar
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    clothing is a good place to start, like someone suggested pj pants. taught my son that at 7.
    put off till tomorrow what you can do today, and if you procrastinate long enough, you may never have to do it.

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    Tote or simple purse!

  8. #8
    Senior Member maryfrang's Avatar
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    I got to judge the 4 H sewing projects this year. Putting a zipper into a purse or even a pillow, also French seams. they were both a big one with their projects.

  9. #9
    Super Member madamekelly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ps 150 View Post
    Hi, I'm a homeschooler and have been sewing with my daughters for years, so I have their sewing classes down. The tricky part is that I have a terrible black thumb. So, my DD's BFF's mom, who is a great gardener is going to teach my girls how to garden and I will teach her teenaged daughter how to sew. I want to teach her lessons that encompass many aspects of sewing, not just garments and quilts. I want to use lessons with applique and how to use fusibles, maybe do a few bags and things like that. So far I've come up with:

    *An advent calendar wall hanging that uses applique, straight line quilting and hand sewing.
    *A snowman ornament that teaches hand sewing and the blanket stitch.
    *Embroidering a pre-printed block to teach hand embroidery.
    *Making an apron with machine embroidered name on the front.
    *Making a pillow with a Christmas Tree on the front to teach sewing with ribbons and machine sewing buttons onto fabric.

    As you can see, I'm trying to come up with projects that will teach a few techniques per project. She has VERY limited sewing experience. Any thoughts?
    Check some online sampler quilts that teach new skills with each block, and when she is done with all the blocks, she has a quilt she made to show for it, and remind her of the different lessons.
    If you always do, what you have always done, The results never change. Change is the wings you give yourself.

  10. #10
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    At our Homemakers Extension Office we had a summer project teaching kiddies to sew. We started with sitting them at a sewing machine teaching them the parts of the machine and how to thread it. Then had straright lines drawn on paper and without thread had them "sew" on the lines, progressed to circles and then free motion. After a this session we gave them a certificate and they loved it when... we signed the certificates to take home to their parents. The children ranged from 4 yrs (yep, 4) to teenage and included boys. I loved helping teach them. At the end of a week they had sewn in zippers, made aprons, strip pieced handbags and even a dufffle bag plus a few did their own designed items. For me, it was so much fun!

  11. #11
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    I've been home schooling since 1982. By the time my youngest was done my older ones were sending me DGKs. So I get to do fun things now days homeschooling the DGKs. I was thinking about having the little ones make some hand warmers. They would make some cool gifts. If you have older kids and wanted to teach them production sewing something like that would be an easy and fun project. The hand warmers could have applique or they could be quilted. They could be sewn in shapes or just be very simple first time projects - imagination... project for all skill levels.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  12. #12
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    I found some super hero hand warmers for boys to try to make:
    http://www.boyohboyohboycrafts.com/2...e-their_6.html
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  13. #13
    Senior Member giquilt's Avatar
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    I noticed most of your projects are Christmas related. A spring or summer pillow case would be good. I had my DGD#1 make a pillow last summer with her name on it. She picked out all the fabric, fused fabric to interfacing, printed her name on it, cut it out with pinking shears, pinned it to front of pillow. Then I marked dots on the fabric which she used as guide to stitch large quilt stitches with embroidery thread to pillow top. She then sewed the pillow together, turned, and stuffed. Last she whipped stitched closing. She was almost 5. We did this over a weeks time, about 1hour a day. I even let her iron by putting one arm behind her. Now she is asking what our next project is and wants to see my projects.

  14. #14
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Here is another project. My DGD did one for 4-H and went to the state fair with it. The judge loved it because so many techniques were used to make it and yet it is pretty simple. It is a big fat quarter bag suitable for overnighters etc:
    http://www.favequilts.com/Bags-Purse...rom-Martingale
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  15. #15
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    Stuffed toys

    How to take measurements for selecting a pattern - and how to do simple alterations - like hemming a garment.

    I would avoid trying to make closely fitted garments and stay with things like pj bottoms, bathrobes, etc.

    Back packs

    I still think pillowcases are a good first project. The student has something usable.

    Even with a pillowcase, different seam finished would be used - plain (unfinised), pinked edge , serged, French semed, etc,

    You could show how these different finishes hold up with repeated washings.
    Last edited by bearisgray; 11-20-2014 at 07:34 AM.

  16. #16
    Super Member lass's Avatar
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    She could make an "Alzheimer" quilt. One with a zipper block; a block with a tie; one with a big button and button hole; They call them figit quilts. It apparently helps them to feel calmer.
    Education makes a people easy to lead;difficult to govern; and impossible to enslave

  17. #17
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    I know that at our local shop they have a summer sewing classes for kids, PJ bottoms and pillow cases are always a big hit and I love the idea of a zippered bag since zippers are one of the things that a lot of people shy away from

  18. #18
    Super Member thimblebug6000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by miriam View Post
    I found some super hero hand warmers for boys to try to make:
    http://www.boyohboyohboycrafts.com/2...e-their_6.html
    These look like a fun project even for my walking buddies, thanks for the link.

  19. #19
    Super Member thimblebug6000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by miriam View Post
    Here is another project. My DGD did one for 4-H and went to the state fair with it. The judge loved it because so many techniques were used to make it and yet it is pretty simple. It is a big fat quarter bag suitable for overnighters etc:
    http://www.favequilts.com/Bags-Purse...rom-Martingale
    Another fun link, thanks!

  20. #20
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    How to patch, how to repair seams, hems,& buttons. Basic sewing skills to be independent.

  21. #21
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    Be sure to include hemming; repairing a seam; sewing on buttons, snaps and hooks and eyes; making a dart; putting in a zipper (those new lace zippers are darling!); pressing vs. ironing; and using a commercial (McCalls'/Simplicity/Burda) pattern. Most of those are things they will wish they had experienced, at some point in their future.

    Jan in VA
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    peacefully colors my world.
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  22. #22
    Super Member Ps 150's Avatar
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    Wow, so many ideas!! I can't wait to get started with our lessons. She's coming over today and we're going to start with some simple hand sewing and sewing on buttons. I'm thinking she would love to make some pajama bottoms and I've pulled a few of my commercial patterns to teach her to learn to use. We'll start with Simplicity and work our way up to Burda and Vogue.
    "Love is not love which alters when it alteration finds, or bends with the remover to remove."

  23. #23
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    I would do a mix of hand sewing and machine sewing from the start. Build on each skill.
    There is no certain age - it has more to do with hand-eye-coordination. I've been working with two DGDs with very low HEC.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  24. #24
    Super Member Ps 150's Avatar
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    I'd really like to so these in units. Perhaps do a unit on applique. Another on garment sewing (a much longer unit, obviously). Any thoughts on different units?
    "Love is not love which alters when it alteration finds, or bends with the remover to remove."

  25. #25
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ps 150 View Post
    I'd really like to so these in units. Perhaps do a unit on applique. Another on garment sewing (a much longer unit, obviously). Any thoughts on different units?
    I think a lot of it has to do with the student's interests, abilities and time.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

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