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Thread: Home Schooling

  1. #51
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    The key to successful home schooling is the actual involvement of the parents. You were involved and made sure your kids got the education and socialization they require to learn how to negotiate their lives in the world. Not all parents do what you did.
    A quilt is like a good life. It's full of mistakes, but, in the end, it looks pretty good.

  2. #52
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    We have had 7 kids in our family who were home schooled. All have done well as their parents were heavily invested in the school curriculum. These families are readers, so I (a retired college professor) do not notice any deficiencies.

  3. #53
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    We homeschooled all three of our children. We used standardized curriculums and did standardized tests every year. Was it easy? No. We did it so they could get the best education we would provide, so that meant we had to find outside activities so they could have friends, sports, music, etc. in their lives. My oldest son has an MBA from UNC Greensboro and an MA in Music Performance from UW-Madison. He now teaches at University of Michigan. My second son has a BA in business from UNC-Chapel Hill and an MA in German from the University of Kentucky. He now works in Germany at a college teaching English. My daughter has a BA from Chatham University and an MA from UT-Knoxville. She works for a non-profit, after having worked at Kennesaw State University. I guess what I'm saying is that they have all made the transition to working adults very well, and that being homeschooled did not hinder them at college.

    A couple of things they got out of being homeschooled: they learned how to read and learn from a textbook; they learned how to set and achieve goals; each one of them at some point in their mid-teens took control of their own education - set the pace and took ownership of what was required to complete their programs. They all got to take some community college classes while still in high school.

    Was it work for me and my husband? Yes. It would have been a lot easier to just send them to the public school. It worked out for us because we put the work into it - just about like everything in life.

  4. #54
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    it's like everything else in life, you get out of it what you put into it. One of my best friends growing up was homeschooled and our town had a huge homeschool population so there were city activities and they even threw a prom for the high schoolers in their group every year. She had a great education and has done well in adulthood. There's a huge homeschool group here in Austin that have tons of great activities and field trips.

    on the other hand, I was a freshman in college and another young adult sitting next to me in a class said, "Oh! there are boys! Wow" I was speechless (rare for me.) turned out she was raised at home with her mother and her sisters homeschooled "away from men and their sin" and had never been around males. at all! she lasted less than a semester before she went home to mommy.
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 05-13-2019 at 10:58 AM. Reason: shouting/all caps

  5. #55
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    Men only have one sin???? Gee< I thought I had a lot more than that.
    "Sacrifices must be made." Otto Lilienthal

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by KalamaQuilts View Post
    Preface by saying I don't have kids so I don't have an personal agenda for or against.

    Just curious if you home schooled your kids or were home schooled yourself and how you feel about it in retrospect.
    And why you took it on to begin with, were you an educator? My friends who did it weren't, they said they studied just ahead of whatever their kids were learning

    I practice Spencerian writing script and got my books from a home school supply place and was totally impressed at how many options they carried for learning things outside the reading/writing/arithmetic spectrum. None involving sports...

    Our oldest son home schools his children. When he first started this it was hard for him and our grandkids when out on field trips. People would come up to him and demand why the kids weren't in school. Apparently he had to get some sort of paperwork saying the kids were home schooled and keep it on his person when out on events with the kids during school hours.

    He has done a wonderful job with them, they are right up there with there peers who attend public school.
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  7. #57
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    I can't imagine people demanding to know why kids aren't in school!!! Some people don't have enough to do...........

  8. #58
    Power Poster sewbizgirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chasing Hawk View Post
    People would come up to him and demand why the kids weren't in school.
    There is only one proper answer to that question: "Mind your own business."
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  9. #59
    Power Poster sewbizgirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cathyvv View Post

    I have two grands who are home schooled. Their parents rarely involve the kids in outside of the home activities. One of them is, and always was, extremely shy, but did ok in school, had a few friends. Since he has been home schooled he has basically become a hermit. He does not know how to be around people he doesn't know. He is literally frozen if someone he doesn't know says hello. He's learning his lessons, but has learned nothing about surviving in the world.

    His brother has Aspergers and is very bright, also sociable. He visited me to help me in November and I had to make sure he did school work. (snip)
    He's afraid of school because he feels he won't be accepted by the other kids. Might be true, but he's never had the opportunity to find out, or figure out how to get along.

    So, while they are doing their schooling, I don't consider it a successful endeavor. What good is knowing stuff if you are frightened of the world? I think home schooling can work well for some families, though.
    It sounds like the two children you described have issues that would actually be worsened by forcing them to go to school. Anxiety is not cured by throwing the child into the pot. My son had social anxiety and I didn't understand it when he was small. I thought he was just being silly. But the anxiety was real, as I came to find out. Home education was the best thing for him. He has a brilliant mind and still does. He went to college and got his pilot's license. He's had some high level jobs with government security clearance. I think the best upbringing for a child who is "frightened of the world", is to face it with their parents at their side.

    Some children are just not emotionally benefited from group education.
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  10. #60
    Super Member Chasing Hawk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sewbizgirl View Post
    There is only one proper answer to that question: "Mind your own business."
    That's what he said..lol
    Everyone is born right handed, only the gifted overcome it.
    I have already committed my felonies, so people don't have to worry. (Russell Means)
    I swear to you, I am guilty of only being Indian. That's why I am here. (Leonard Peltier)
    “If you can’t see a mistake from 12 feet away, it doesn’t exist, and there are no perfect quilts and that helps a lot,” .......Greg Biornstad

  11. #61
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    That is not the case with these boys.

    One of them was in school through 3rd grade and doing ok. He wasn't a star pupil, but he made friends, expressed his opinions, made decisions on the small stuff and was interested in the world around him. He was sociable, but needed some time to warm up to both the situation and the people around him. My 71 year old husband is like that, and he does not suffer from severe anxiety.

    Once home schooled, his parents, despite saying that they would get the kids involved with teams, projects, etc. outside of school, did nothing to encourage any activity outside of the home. They always had an excuse for not doing so - most of them amounted to "I don't want to". They actively encourage the fear of school and people by threatening to send them to public school. I don't think the parents have a clue about how devastating their overall attitude has been to the boys. Unfortunately, the parents are 'all about me' types. They will never understand what they have done to those boys.

    The first year of home schooling neither boy was doing any of the work because neither parent could be bothered. Mom got sick and had surgery so I went out to help out. The only reason the kids got started on the school work is that i made it my priority to get them going. The shy one was so eager to learn that it astounded me. He managed the entire school years worth of work from end of January to June 1. That was after telling me he had short term memory problems - diagnosed by a so-called learning disability expert. My response to that was, "Me, too. But I know how to help you with that." No one ever just sat down with him to explain how to study. He didn't understand why text was bolded, italicized, in tables, etc. Once encouraged, he was amazed at what he could do. So was I.

    The younger one, who has Aspergers, is very bright. He told me he didn't have to do school and he was smarter than me. His mother encouraged that feeling in him. I dealt with it through concrete examples. For instance, he could do amazing math on a calculater. So I wrote out a couple of 3 digit addition/subtraction problems and asked him to solve them. He had no idea what to do. A day and a half later, he could actually do addition and subtraction. He is smart!

    His temper tantrums ran the home, so I gently disciplined him - it took 1.5 days to modify his behavior with me. I have no idea how he behaves at home now, but when he is with me he's a great kid.

    Parents of a home schooled child make a huge difference in the success of the home schooling.
    A quilt is like a good life. It's full of mistakes, but, in the end, it looks pretty good.

  12. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by leonf View Post
    Men only have one sin???? Gee< I thought I had a lot more than that.
    crazy huh? as someone who comes from a family that leans heavily towards the male side and I have male siblings and my best friend for years have usually been males, I was truly stunned that she'd never been around them. She and her sisters didn't spring up out of the ground so she must have had a father at some point!

  13. #63
    Power Poster Annaquilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sewbizgirl View Post
    Ha ha... I have to shake my head at some of the 'opinions' of those who have had no experience homeschooling, whatsoever. I home educated all three of my children during the 90's and 2000's and finished up when the last one graduated in 2008. I'm sad to see the same old fallacies about homeschooling are still alive and well.

    Actually, the "insular world" is in the institutional classroom, where the kids are surrounded by only those of their same age, every day of their life. If they weren't confined to that environment for the vast majority of their waking hours (not to mention tied up with hours more of homework once they get home), they might have time to learn all the other important aspects of life... cooking, building, gardening, raising animals, learning a trade with mom or dad, volunteer work, fine arts training, or whatever their natural leanings are. They would not be subject to "group think" and indoctrination of what is "correct" according to someone who the government hired to "educate" them. They instead grow and flourish within the values of their parents.

    In reality, you don't need nearly as much time to educate a child every day when you don't have to waste time dealing with the kids who act out (at worst), or just can't keep up with your child's learning level (at best). It is not necessary to replicate the format of public school, and is not even beneficial.

    Home educating families are more often than not part of local support groups with other HE families. There are tons of opportunities to "socialize", learn together, take field trips and just gather to have play days. They are also with peers in church and community sports teams. The concept that HE kids are just kept in a box, is ridiculous. And they are out in society so much more than kids confined to the classroom. They are unfettered! They are commonly very comfortable conversing with people of all ages, especially adults. They have a huge 'leg up' on being productive adult citizens. And they, in large percentage, do become leaders as adults.

    School can really harm a child's natural love of learning by boring them, day after day after day.

    So I'm offering a few thoughts that may be new to some... from someone who has lived the home educating life.
    Exactly! The above mentioned and the children that were able to interact with adults is what impressed me. Also please do not mistake people that are too lazy to bring their children too school with home schooled children.
    Anna Quilts

  14. #64
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    That is truly sad.
    A quilt is like a good life. It's full of mistakes, but, in the end, it looks pretty good.

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