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Thread: immigration question

  1. #26
    Super Member Aurora's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lynnie View Post
    someone showed pictures of immigrants coming to America.

    Does anyone know what the accommodations were on the ships and how long it took to get here from Europe.I know different ports were different times, but in general. I'm curious as to what they did on the ship all day, and what meals were like and sleeping accommodations. Does anyone know approximate prices of tickets were back then. My grandparents came from Poland in the early 1900's.
    thanks for any information anyone has.
    Lynnie,

    Last summer I purchased a cookbook at a local flea market called "The Ellis Island Immigrant Cookbook". It includes information on Ellis Island and the arrival of Immigrants. It also includes a few letters from Immigrants, as well as family recipes.

    You have asked interesting questions. My father-in-law was from Sicily, but I don't ever recall his family talking about how they came here.
    Last edited by Aurora; 02-17-2016 at 07:26 AM.
    Aurora

    "A dying culture invariably exhibits personal rudeness. Bad manners. Lack of consideration for others in minor matters. A loss of politeness, of gentle manners, is more significant than is a riot." -Robert A. Heinlein

  2. #27
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    A sincere thank you for not only the question asked but also the excellent reply. I have printed the question with links.

  3. #28
    Super Member Luv Quilts and Cats's Avatar
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    My grandfather and his parents came over from Belgium in the early 1900s. Most immigrants came over in steerage as that was the cheapest ticket and all most could afford. Steerage is at the bottom of the boat with no individual rooms. It's an open space used for storage. So people would pick out a spot and try to put up rope or clothesline to mark out a space and get some privacy. Food was horrible, the smell was horrible because there were no provisions usually for people to bath. As the trip went on the air became thick with smoke from people smoking and small lanterns and stoves running on kerosene. Also, being packed in so close together, with people from all ages from babies to the elderly, the atmosphere in steerage was ripe for spreading diseases. In som cased, steerage people could only come on deck at night, as the other passengers did not want to mingle with them. A lot of people died on the the crossing, and those who caught certain diseases were not allowed into the country. they had to stay behind to get better at the hospital and their families had to go on without them. The hope was when they got better they would catch up with the family, if the could. Some ended up being shippped back where the came from. It was not an easy passage.
    Luv Quilts and Cats
    Never underestimate the healing effects of beauty. - Florence Nightingale

  4. #29
    Power Poster lynnie's Avatar
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    I wasn't looking for my families history, I was wondering in general.
    very interesting facts some of you have relayed to me. I thank you all for your families histories.
    Luv quilts and cats, very interesting about the hull of the ship. I doubt people would go through
    these hard times now adays. THey were promised streets paved with gold, and got a lot of rocks.
    It was interesting to hear from some of you that the 'cruise' only took about 3 weeks. And we
    think our mail is slow nowadays. Thank you all for relaying your stories.
    put off till tomorrow what you can do today, and if you procrastinate long enough, you may never have to do it.

  5. #30
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    I just Googled Origin of name and typed my mother's maiden name and my maiden name. Very interesting. Mostly English on father's side and German on mother's. My cousins are into geneaology and are in clubs andforums. I just contact them with questions.

  6. #31
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    There is a very interesting book called Coffin Ships which describes some of the conditions immigrants coming from Ireland (to escape the famine) endured in the mid 1800's.
    It was very rough indeed and many, many poor souls died en route. But conditions were so dire at home they were willing to risk it.
    I realize your ancestors came over later, as did mine, but interesting reading nevertheless.

  7. #32
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    Sure wish I could have asked my grandmother that...she was the only grandparent living when I was born. But she didn't speak Englisk, and I was young enough when she died that it wouldn't have occurred to me to ask her. My parents never shared that information. 😢

  8. #33
    Power Poster JuneBillie's Avatar
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    On my mother's side I have German decent, and on my father's side Irish. My maternal grand mother's maiden name was Oxier. I haven't heard that name around outside of my family. My maiden name is Tompkins, but many want to spell it like Thompson with an h after the T, but there is no h in it.

    Many names changed in spellings due to however some one interpreted the name through out time.

  9. #34
    Super Member leaha's Avatar
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    My gramps was a cabin boy on a sailing ship, from Scotland he sailed around the horn and past san Francisco in. 1905 the year before the earthquake, he jumped ship in Portland oregon he was twelve years old
    dare to dream

  10. #35
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    Family histories are so interesting......wish I, too, had asked questions of family members who had came over...lost forever information..

  11. #36
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    Re ancestrycom. Someone said if you go to the library you can use their account...don't know if that true, haven't tried it.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by lynnie View Post
    I wasn't looking for my families history, I was wondering in general.
    very interesting facts some of you have relayed to me. I thank you all for your families histories.
    Luv quilts and cats, very interesting about the hull of the ship. I doubt people would go through
    these hard times now adays. THey were promised streets paved with gold, and got a lot of rocks.
    It was interesting to hear from some of you that the 'cruise' only took about 3 weeks. And we
    think our mail is slow nowadays. Thank you all for relaying your stories.
    You can see that a lot of people don't read the replies or remember what the OP wanted.
    I forgot to say that the trip for my great-grandparents and their three children took 16 days on the ship. They had missed the Cimbria, the boat on which they were suppose to sail. It had left port the day before they arrived so they had to wait three days for the next steamer, the Amerika, and live at a hotel till then--"a heavy drain on our purse." Later, when they were in Wisconsin, they learned that the Cimbria had gone down in the storm. Their relatives back in Germany thought they were on that ship, and were now lost.

    I will quote some of Aunt Annie's writings.
    "I recall the boarding of that ship--walking up the plank bridge, holding tight to mother's skirt with one hand, carrying in the other a little box cage containing a pair of carrier pigeons which my father had entrusted to me, and which he meant to take to his new home somewhere in the primeval forests of northern Wisconsin.
    I can recall the stormy voyage. Our bunk was near the stairs heading to the deck. For three days we were not allowed to go on deck. The iron trap door kept us imprisoned while the big ship rocked from side to side, spilling our oatmeal gruel and unpeeled potatoes which two sailors brought down in a big canteen to feed the people in the hold. Most people were sick, and so were we.
    On the 16th day of this stormy voyage, the good ship brought us to Baltimore harbor. There we boarded the "Immigrant Train" for the West. The car was a dirty thing. The seats were of tin, dirty and cold. It took three days to reach Milwaukee--three days of hunger and thirst with only oranges for sale. Then we remembered the ship as a very good friend that provided ample good food in the form of wheat bread, oatmeal, potatoes, and often some salt herring or meat. When we reached Milwaukee, a hack brought us to a hotel where we got something to eat and a room to sleep in one night. Next day a horse streetcar, running on wooden rails brought us to a train headed for northern Wisconsin."
    The rest of the story tells about their trip north and how they found a fertile farm with a drafty cabin and spent a very cold winter with very few provisions and poor clothing for this climate.
    Aunt Annie started teaching school at 16 years of age and had to walk through the woods to get to the school. Later she went to college and taught German in high school until 1918 when she lost that job because they no longer wanted German taught.
    I hope you enjoy this story.
    Last edited by maviskw; 02-19-2016 at 07:09 PM.
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by lynnie View Post
    I wasn't looking for my families history, I was wondering in general.
    very interesting facts some of you have relayed to me. I thank you all for your families histories.
    Luv quilts and cats, very interesting about the hull of the ship. I doubt people would go through
    these hard times now adays. THey were promised streets paved with gold, and got a lot of rocks.
    It was interesting to hear from some of you that the 'cruise' only took about 3 weeks. And we
    think our mail is slow nowadays. Thank you all for relaying your stories.
    I think the Refugees from Syria who have been bombed out of their homes and are often walking hundreds of miles with very few possessions could relate. Especially those who are getting into dodgy boats to cross the Mediterranean with the few possessions they can carry.

    I find the movement of people around the world to be fascinating, but often heartbreaking. Since the late 70's there have been the Vietnamese Boat People, European refugees from Serbia and Kosovo, Rwandan refugees fleeing genocide, while the world looked on, and now millions of people in Syria being displaced by war.

    My cousin's family is Japanese and they were forced from their home during WW11 in Canada. Forcibly moved hundreds of miles away.

    For the most part my family has been lucky, they have moved around the world by choice, not due to war, genocide or economic necessity.
    Attending University. I will graduate a year after my son and year before my daughter.

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