Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 27

Thread: Living space

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Posts
    500
    Blog Entries
    1

    Living space

    I am trying to decide where to live in the next couple of years when I retire. Stay in town or move to the country? How small living space can I "survive" in. I have been looking at the Tiny Houses but being a quilter..i guess I could put a quilt shed next to it. Trying to lower my living expenses to the bare minimum since all I have is social security. Right now I own a home in Phoenix but won't be able to keep it up, I have a manufactured home outside Maricopa but fear in the future I won't be able to get to the store for groceries. Thinking about a single wide, maybe and I would like to get out of the heat. If you are retired, what type of housing do you have and what is the square footage?

  2. #2
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    western NY formerly MN, FL, NC, SC
    Posts
    49,428
    Blog Entries
    53
    in MN, i had a 1700sf townhome. when moving to NY, i had to settle on 1000sf, using the dining room as my sewing room. then i could not keep up the maintenance on that home and moved to a 600sf apartment. with very creative storage, i still have room for all of my quilting/sewing items. downsizing was very difficult, but i'm getting used to it. no maintenance means i have more sewing/quilting time
    good luck.
    Nancy in western NY
    before you speak T.H.I.N.K.
    T is it True? H is it Helpful? I is it Inspiring? N is it Necessary? K is it Kind?

    Life may not be the party we hoped for, but while we are here we might as well dance.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Jennie and Me's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    N.W. Missouri
    Posts
    859
    A couple of years ago, my quilting friends and I were out and about. We love to go to out of the way places to eat. Beside the restaurant were a couple of tiny cabins that were for sale. This was in a big hunting area and hunters would buy these cabins for their hunting retreats. I fell in love with them! We went in the side door...to your right was the bedroom and bathroom. To the left was a stairway leading to a loft. Also the small hall leading to the small kitchen and living room. It was just right for a single person. When you go in the front way there was a small screened porch. So danged adorable!! The loft could be your sewing area. I've tried to find the exact same floor plan online with no success.

  4. #4
    Super Member tucsonquilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    1,086
    When I retired, I moved from Flagstaff to Tucson because of how expensive and hard it was to stay warm during the winter. I find it much less expensive to live in a warmer climate. Also there are many senior mobile home parks, townhomes, and apartments that are less expensive then non-senior communities. I also find it very wonderful to live near everything so if my car breaks down I am not stranded.

  5. #5
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Somewhere
    Posts
    15,528
    Blog Entries
    2
    You might take a long look at an IKEA catalog or visit one of their stores. They seem to be all about living in smaller spaces.
    Never let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  6. #6
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Outside St. Louis
    Posts
    35,094
    We already live in a small house. We plan to live here the rest of our lives. One never knows what life may throw at us.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  7. #7
    Super Member sparkys_mom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    2,373
    Quote Originally Posted by miriam View Post
    You might take a long look at an IKEA catalog or visit one of their stores. They seem to be all about living in smaller spaces.
    IKEA is amazing! They have some incredible ideas for living in extremely small spaces. Of course you will wind up spending a lot of money for their furniture to accomplish that but it could very well be worth it. You would need to find a community center or library where you could lay out a quilt for basting, etc. I just looked and you are fortunate to have an IKEA close to you. Even if you don't opt for their solutions they certainly have good ideas.
    Pat

  8. #8
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Ocala, FL
    Posts
    195
    Go online and take a look at On Top of the World in Ocala, FL. Then look at real estate for OTOW in the Ocala Star Banner paper. The only homes on the OTOW site will, of course, be new ones that start at around $150,000. But, OTOW was started in the 1980s with villa homes, two to 4 joined homes. These older homes are much lower in price. One of the smaller ones, about 1,000 sq ft, was listed last week at $49,000. All homes in OTOW are concrete block construction so are sturdy and quiet. Most of the older ones have had lots of improvements (sun rooms, tile floors, etc.). You would buy this on a 99-yr lease so you don't buy the land. Taxes are low here and no state income tax. You will pay a monthly maintenance fee of $350-$400. This will cover insurance on the outside, painting the outside, yard work, gate security, basic cable, water in the villas, maintenance of the properties, etc. There are 3 pools, 3 golf courses, pickleball and tennis courts, restaurants on site, a huge senior educational program, two small shopping centers with two supermarkets -- all accessible by golf cart if you don't drive much. Many clubs (including a quilting club and two crafts clubs). One hospital, two ERs, many medical offices within 10-15 minutes from your house, two more hospitals in town (about 20-minute drive). We have been here 11 years and really like it here.

  9. #9
    Junior Member sjdal's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    182
    I moved from San Diego to a small town in NE that has amazing senior services. The senior center has a wonderful lunch every day for $4.00, meals on wheels, if one is unable to get out, a senior bus to take you to lunch, shopping or other appointments, a great grocery store and very friendly people.

  10. #10
    Senior Member LITTLEOLDME's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Great N W Oregon
    Posts
    561
    I live in the home I bought in 1976 when transferred to Oregon from Ca. it has 1500 sq.ft. plant to live here as long as the good Lord lets me live. Got it paid for before retiring. Have to hire some one to help with the yards most of the time now. but that's ok, my teen grandson can use the money, also hire him to vacuum for me.
    love my quilting and embroidery works, who need very much furniture ??
    Freedom to speak is a gift ;please don't take it from us..

  11. #11
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    south of Houston, TX
    Posts
    186
    I have 2 children who live within 2 hours of each other. I would move relatively close to them, because it would so much easier on them when I get to a more fragile stage in my life.....or at least closer to my siblings.

  12. #12
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Sonoma County, CA
    Posts
    4,294
    You may consider trying to find a place that has common areas as a way to expand your space - so maybe your single-wide could be in a park that has a common room that you could use to lay out and baste quilts? That's what my gran did with hers - she lived in a single-wide as long as I can remember and made beautiful quilts.

  13. #13
    Power Poster ManiacQuilter2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    18,937
    You need to Google areas where you would like to live. There are apts out there that are available with income restrictions. I never thought in a million years I would be riding on one of those old people community buses but being disable, I made the move. I am the youngest in the community. My only suggest is always keep moving and don't stop for any reason.
    A Good Friend, like an old quilt, is both a Treasure and a Comfort

  14. #14
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Mableton, GA
    Posts
    9,831
    so much to consider. We don't live near any family and our friends are aging too. One son lives in a different city and wants us to move there. I am "all in" but Mr. Stitchnripper (who is 12 years younger than I am) can't see the writing on the wall, that we will most likely need son's help at some point and I'd like to move when I can enjoy it. Other son would look after us, but, he and his family live in a place I don't think I'd like to retire to. For me, the advantages of moving near son are 1: good medical care; 2: airline hub; 3: 4 decent seasons, no extremes; and 4: no hurricanes. so we are in kind of a stand off right now. Good luck with your decisions!!!
    Alyce

  15. #15
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    121
    Blog Entries
    12
    I'm in almost the same position as you. Right now I'm getting social security plus working part time, and within the next year or so I want to completely quit working and will thus need to downsize. I'm looking at retiring to Green Valley, AZ which is a little south of Tucson, but a higher elevation and not as hot. It has the most affordable properties I've seen and the most flexibility in lifestyle from homes to townhouses to mobile homes, all in nice areas. I'm thinking about getting a 2-bedroom, 588 sq.ft. villa in Villa West or Villa East areas. These are central areas within walking distance to a shopping center, doctors, bank, and transportation. Also a new hospital is to be completed early 2015 just to the south of Green Valley. The prices range from about $35,000 for 1 BD up to a high of about $60,000 for 2 BD. The HOA fee is $195/month and includes AC/Heating, Common area maintenance, exterior maintenance of unit, garbage collection, pest control, roof repair and replacement, water, blanket insurance policy. They have green park-like areas and swimming pools included in the HMO. Many villas are available furnished. Property taxes run about $400-$450 in the Villas. There are many senior activities in the area, and also many organizations which assist seniors who need transportation, in-home care, etc. There is a quilt guild, many volunteer opportunities, and of course golf courses . They also have Green Valley Recreation which one can join with 13 recreation centers offering pools, exercise equipment, movies, dancing, workshops like jewelry making and woodworking, a computer club, hiking, tennis, etc. It's retirement heaven! Whenever you get serious about an area, it's fun to subscribe to the local newspaper so you can become familiar with the area before making a commitment. Good luck & maybe I'll see you there some day.

  16. #16
    Junior Member beksclen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Crossville TN
    Posts
    190
    Blog Entries
    1
    Crossville TN is a retirement area and low cost of living. It is on what is called the Plateau so cooler in the summer months. We moved here from MI over 8 years ago and love it.
    Becky

  17. #17
    Super Member madamekelly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Central Willamette Valley, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    7,663
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by sjdal View Post
    I moved from San Diego to a small town in NE that has amazing senior services. The senior center has a wonderful lunch every day for $4.00, meals on wheels, if one is unable to get out, a senior bus to take you to lunch, shopping or other appointments, a great grocery store and very friendly people.
    I have found the same amenities in a little town in Oregon. The pace is slower than the city, but has everything I need or want, and if we drive 1-2 hours we can be up in the snow year round, or in a large city, or at the ocean. It's perfect. I have 1513 sq. ft. In a manufactured home, and it only costs me $20 per month to keep the .31 acre yard mowed. My own little piece of heaven. The best thing I did was buy a homeowner's warranty, it covers everything the home owner's insurance doesn't. I pay $47 per month, and plumbers, electricians, carpenters, whatever costs me a flat $60 per visit! Used to be you could only buy a warranty when you bought a home, but now any homeowner can buy one. Worth every penny!
    Last edited by madamekelly; 10-28-2014 at 09:43 AM.
    If you always do, what you have always done, The results never change. Change is the wings you give yourself.

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    888
    Quote Originally Posted by miriam View Post
    You might take a long look at an IKEA catalog or visit one of their stores. They seem to be all about living in smaller spaces.
    Oh yes, wander through IKEA's floor plans. They set up apartment/house space by square footage and even the 600sqft set is spacious and functional. Great ideas and you can snap a picture of the floor plan.

    Speaking of being on a limited income, I am considering exchanging living quarters (separate building on property) to a limited-income couple. Rent could be summer riding mower and maybe laundry or one supper meal prepared a week (which of course could make enough for themselves, too. Or instead of mowing taking care of flower beds. Do you think anyone would go for a set up like this? The building has a kitchen, bedroom, living room and bathroom and utilities only run about 50/month.

  19. #19
    Super Member gramajo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Peotone IL
    Posts
    2,790
    Quote Originally Posted by yobrosew View Post

    Speaking of being on a limited income, I am considering exchanging living quarters (separate building on property) to a limited-income couple. Rent could be summer riding mower and maybe laundry or one supper meal prepared a week (which of course could make enough for themselves, too. Or instead of mowing taking care of flower beds. Do you think anyone would go for a set up like this? The building has a kitchen, bedroom, living room and bathroom and utilities only run about 50/month.
    I think this is a very generous offer. This would be great for a limited income couple as long as they are physically able to mow or do yard work. If I were able to mow or do garden work, I'd certainly take you up on it..

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    888
    Quote Originally Posted by gramajo View Post
    I think this is a very generous offer. This would be great for a limited income couple as long as they are physically able to mow or do yard work. If I were able to mow or do garden work, I'd certainly take you up on it..
    We don't want the income per se as when we retire it would mess up our taxes, which is why we would trade off for something we don't like to do or just seem to always be behind on. That's why it would not necessarily be mowing as might be too much for someone. Actually just having someone take over the utilities would be great. Heat is radiant floor heat, which is why so inexpensive. Heck, if they played pinochle, rent could be play once a week with DH and I! It is something I have been playing around with in my head.

  21. #21
    Senior Member Michellesews's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    El Paso Texas
    Posts
    988
    I'm sure a young couple might jump at that. I would have when I was young. But not young any longer�� but love my life!
    Michelle Guadarrama

  22. #22
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Homosassa, FL
    Posts
    2,259
    I would think that would be great for some senior or even middle aged couple/person who doesn't have a big income. Just be careful as the wrong person can be more trouble than they are worth, check out references and have them fill out a detailed application. There good and bad out there. Think we have a good one this time, last two people in there we had to ask to leave, first friends were stealing from us and second turned out to be a coke head and didn't pay rent and was supposed to do some work in re of rent and didn't do that either. When he had his dealer coming over that was it, will not have that on our property.

  23. #23
    Super Member sewingsuz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    6,673
    I have live in a 1500 sq ft home for 29 yrs now. I thought is was way to small for many years. Well, now that I am older and also got some IKEA cabinets in one bedroom and also my sewing room it is OK now. I could not do with anything smaller for DH and myself.
    Suzanne
    Asking a seamstress to mend is like asking Picasso to paint your garage.

  24. #24
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Texas currently
    Posts
    1,059
    Blog Entries
    5
    Have you looked into the reverse mortgages? I haven't, but have only see ads on TV. Possibility.

  25. #25
    Super Member jbj137's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Duncan, SC, 29334 USA
    Posts
    4,567
    Blog Entries
    2
    ***
    *** I live in a 1350 sq. ft. house (1/2 acre yard) that I bought after my divorce 22 1/2 years ago.
    *** I plan to live here as long as I can maintain it by my self -or-
    *** until my Guy asks me to marry him -or- live with him in his 3600 sq. ft. home.
    ***
    J J (jbj137)

    I am a G.R.I.T.
    G = girl R =raised I = in T = the S = South

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.