Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 65

Thread: Mental Illness -

  1. #1
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    23,137

    Mental Illness -

    This is a spin-off from the Robin Williams thread - -

    One of the hardest parts of dealing with mental illness (which is a VERY broad term - right up there with cancer - for being non-specific)

    Is that so many people that need treatment won't admit that they need help.

    And if they do admit they need help, many can't afford it or know where to go.

    And - many "treatments" really don't work all that well - one has to be willing to do a lot of trials to find something that works. Also, some treatments do more harm than good.

    How does one "test" for these things? I don't think it shows up like diabetes or anemia does with a lab test.

    I don't know the answer.

    It does seem that highly intelligent, talented people seem more prone to mental disturbances than "ordinary" folks.

    Way back when - some religions believed that mental illness was called by demons.

    These are opinions. More are welcome.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    457
    It is time to put away our judgement and support these people that are coping or have coped with this disease. Until society understands, many will continue to suffer in silence.

  3. #3
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    oregon
    Posts
    1,368
    Blog Entries
    1
    It amazes me that folks with a visible problem,or one that involves a non- brain body part, are given support and sympathy. Brain illnesses are hidden,denied,not talked about...but every bit as devastating.
    Life may not be the party we planned for,but while we are here we should dance!

  4. #4
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Western North Carolina
    Posts
    1,412
    All mental illnesses are tough, especially the PTSD our returning veterans are suffering. I have a son who served twice in Afghanistan and received no physical injuries (for which I'm thankful), but the problems he's had with PTSD are horrible. He has been hospitalized at least 7-8 times. Thankfully, right now he is doing well.

  5. #5
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Tri-Cities, WA
    Posts
    1,058
    I have lived with chronic depression and anxiety for almost my whole life (I had symptoms as a child that are associated with mental illness). I've been hospitalized twice, been suicidal once, and have had a whole lot of questions as to whether life is worth living. After many kinds of treatment I am fairly stable now. I also began developing chronic pain 30 years ago which has resulted in many trips to the doctor, two surgeries, and two more coming eventually.

    I would take the physical pain in a heartbeat over the mental and emotional pain I experienced for many years. Physical pain can be seen by others, and most people are always willing to give you a little emotional support for it. But you can't tell anyone that your brain hurts so badly you'd almost be willing to give up all the people you love just to have it stop. Can you imagine how much physical pain you'd have to be in to be willing to lose your life to stop it? That's what deep depression does to a person, and some people get to where it's too much.

    I grieve for Robin William's family - he himself is at peace. And I pray for everyone who has this illness, and for the people who care for them.

    Margaret Ford
    I hope it was okay to share this much. I'll try to mostly talk about quilting!

  6. #6
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Tri-Cities, WA
    Posts
    1,058
    Bearisgray - thanks for calling me highly intelligent and talented!

  7. #7
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Mableton, GA
    Posts
    9,837
    Thanks for this topic. Seems like we are making slow progress in getting rid of the stigma of mental illness and in making affordable help available. Remember way back when this was Rosalynn Carter's issue. (I'm not meaning to start a political discussion). My brother killed himself almost 12 years ago and he was a very successful clinical psychologist. He kept his deepest pain hidden from us. And like Robin Williams he was a quick wit and very funny (not meaning he was that talented of course) but lots was unknown to us. I spoke with him almost every day and we did email at least once a day. He did a good job of covering up and it is my great sadness that I couldn't help him and have lost him. So I have a clue as to Mr Williams' family's pain and others too.
    Alyce

  8. #8
    Super Member LindaM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Rural Small Town Ontario
    Posts
    1,472
    I believe Francie has nailed the issue - these are not 'visible' problems. It's so much easier to have compassion and empathy and understanding when you can see the broken leg, not so much the broken heart.
    Linda
    http://quiltingbiker.blogspot.com

  9. #9
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Central NJ
    Posts
    5,249
    I have a friend (really - it's a friend) who has been suffering from a very severe depression for a number of years now. I encourage her at every opportunity to seek help. The reasons for her depression are very valid but it's devastating for her nonetheless. I want to see this woman want to live a fulfilling life again. Her husband is not overly supportive of her seeking treatment. The costs involved are a very real part of his lack of support. I sometimes get so frustrated by her depression I just don't know what to do. I wish I knew better what to do to help her beyond listening and encouraging her to seek treatment.

  10. #10
    Super Member jclinganrey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Orange County, CA
    Posts
    3,035
    Thanks, Stitchnripper for sharing your experience. My brother committed suicide 6 1/2 years ago due to profound depression. His wife, an RN, at his insistence, promised to not tell us, his family. So I never had any idea he was struggling with depression. My family and I discovered, after his death that he repeatedly refused to get any kind of help or treatment, saying he didn't want to be a 'zombie.' For that, I hold him responsible. I hold her responsible for not getting some kind of help/intervention.

    I really feel for Robin Williams' family. I know all too well how they feel. It's a very unique kind of loss; nothing quite like it and unless someone has had a friend or family member kill themselves, in my experience, they don't truly understand. It was really difficult for me to talk about with others. I had people ask morbid questions which was none of their business and felt like I was being stabbed in the heart all over again.

    Thanks for listening - - - -
    Jane

  11. #11
    Power Poster lynnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    24,600
    Blog Entries
    1
    I lived with cronic depression and anxiety for years. At age 22 I sought help at the mental health clinic.
    there was a 6 month waiting list, so the girl at the counter said if i was sucidial, i could get in that afternoon. (they kept the afternoon open for 'crazy people') so that's what i had to do. Got alot of slack from my family when they found out a few years later. called me every name in the book from retart tolunatic. (they were a big part of the problem). when my sister's wife turned out to be depressed, everyone said it was o.k. and sympathized with her. there is a terrible stigma attached to it. wheni tried to explain that if i needed a heart pill, it would be o.k. but my mom kept on insisting i was just a crazy raving lunatic to be depressed. Thankfully, i' don't need ssi's anymore and don't really suffer from it anymore. Could that have beenwhy i used to jump out 2nd story windows when i was 5???

    People, if you feel you might be depressed, do something about it before it's to late.
    put off till tomorrow what you can do today, and if you procrastinate long enough, you may never have to do it.

  12. #12
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    23,137
    Quote Originally Posted by lynnie View Post
    . . .
    there was a 6 month waiting list . . . .
    Which might help explain a lot of the events that have taken place - - - -

    How long would one have to wait for a mammogram? to get one's teeth fixed? to get chest pain looked at?

    (Assuming one has health insurance or private funding!!!)

  13. #13
    Super Member liking quilting's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Southern Minnesota
    Posts
    4,060
    Blog Entries
    2
    The stigma and silence surrounding mental health issues is beginning to lift. Talking about the issues and people getting educated is more common. We all need to "be there" for each other, listen, support, and learn that debilitating depression is not something most of us have experienced or truly can appreciate in terms of it's total grip on the person. Nothing about it is rational or logical. That doesn't mean there isn't hope and help out there, and hopefully we all can be instrumental in helping someone through the worst ordeal imaginable and again get to enjoy life.
    Mavis

  14. #14
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Twin Cities, MN
    Posts
    1,811
    This is such a timely topic for me and my extended family. We are currently in the process of trying to have my sister civilly committed. This has been such a heart wrenching journey. She is currently hospitalized, (has been since end of June) but may be released shortly depending on the judge's findings. She doesn't/can't/won't accept that she is ill. She is a danger to herself, is homeless, jobless, and paranoid. For a wide variety of reasons no one in the family is in a position to take her in, and getting help for someone who does not want help is incredibly difficult. I agree about the stigma part being hard for some people...one of my brothers doesn't want anyone to know, and another brother won't tell his wife! Sometimes, I see that "look" in her eyes, and wonder how terrified and confused she must be. Kudos to all who have had the courage to seek help, aren't ashamed or embarrassed, and have embraced help and treatment, sometimes at great personal cost! Mavis...thank you for your insight and thoughts!
    Last edited by Anniedeb; 08-13-2014 at 11:14 PM.

  15. #15
    Super Member MaryKatherine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Guelph, On. -
    Posts
    1,974
    Blog Entries
    2
    Mental illness is all around us. This is not to say that anyone who doesn't fit our perceived norm is ill. Some times its no more than a temporary loss of self confidence or strength. When I lost my second husband I was convinced I was an unfit mother. My own sister has dealt with so much loss in her life she has given up and now turns a deaf ear to all her family about her strange behaviours. My hubby's ex is such a manic hoarder her daughter hires cleaning company once a year to purge and clean her house.
    All these people hold/held responsible jobs and did them well. You can see nothing wrong unless they are willing to admit to their unhappiness. My own sister refuses counselling as she doesn't want to open her Pandora's Box.
    A suicidal person is like an injured animal who crawls away and hides. Some alcoholics are similar.
    There is so much disconnect in our society. I'm convinced all the electronic gadgets haven't made it better if not worse. We are mammals and need face to face relationships.
    There is no simple formula. I try to keep my Friends, friends. Family is a one time, if not long relationship. Just be there, listen and love, no matter how painful.
    I'm off this afternoon to an infrequent luncheon with 2 women who I've' been to Hell and back with, my life's journey and theirs, over the last 40 years. And I come home to a not perfect life, glad to be alive.
    marykayhopkins123.blogspot.com

  16. #16
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    2,061
    I have a beloved niece who suffers from schizophrenia. It has been a lifelong struggle for her and for her family. She would take meds until she felt better and believe she was well and then stop the meds and then regress again. She was in and out of independent living situations, could not keep a job, wanted to be a movie star, a rock singer, etc. etc. She has finally landed in an assisted living place where she seems to get along pretty well. They supervise her meds and see that she eats and they go places and do things that she seems to enjoy. She is more stable than she has ever been and the other people who live there are kind of like family to her. She communicates with her son and the communications are sensible. We rejoice for the peace she has finally gotten from this horrible disease.

  17. #17
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    6,425
    Treatment is so hard to figure out! My sis-in-law was diagnosed with mental illness. The first week the Dr. prescribed a powerful medicine. The next week the Dr. doubled the med. Two weeks later the Dr. doubled the med again! My SIL went off the rails! She has not recovered from all the damage the med caused. I am still angry at the Dr. for the damage done!

  18. #18
    Super Member PenniF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    North Texas formerly The Burgh
    Posts
    3,387
    I think it's hard for those who have never experienced true depression to appreciate what it does to you. The "snap out of it" response that you so often get prove that. Like so many others, I've been there, done that - been on "that floor" in the hospital....and over the years since i have thankfully learned to recognize the symptoms when they first start and take action, so have been "ok". It makes my heart sick to think of all the people out there who are in that dark place with no one to help.
    For those of you ladies here who have been there too....you are SURVIVORS in every possible way.
    Of all the things i've lost, i miss my mind the most.

  19. #19
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Southern USA
    Posts
    11,447
    One of my guild members suffers from depression. Her DD and grands live out of state and she lives alone so no one but her friends to notice when she gets withdrawn. She won't take her medication as she says she doesn't need it. We can't force her to take it. When she does take it she is happy and fun to be around. She feels great so quits taking it. No way to get her to understand she has to take it everyday. Her Drs have told her, her friends have told her, her daughter won't be around her with her ups and downs because she won't take her meds as needed and she won't go visit her daughter because she says she makes her take her pills when she doesn't need them. It's very frustrating to see her go down over and over. After awhile it gets to be it's her own fault and that is the danger.
    I believe giving what I can will never cause me to be in need.
    Being cheap is not a badge of honor.
    My heroes are working people, paying their own way, taking care of their children and being decent human beings.

  20. #20
    Super Member Wanabee Quiltin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    St. Louis suburbs
    Posts
    6,085
    I want to remind you that he was an alcoholic and drug user. Depression goes with this.

  21. #21
    Super Member Caswews's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Quilting, crocheting, sewing and crafting in my Sewing Room...Peaceful and wonderful !!
    Posts
    5,312
    Thanks Bearisgray
    When Life brings big winds of change that almost blows you over.Hang on tight and Believe.
    Words and hearts should be handled with care-for words when spoken and hearts when broken are the hardest things to repair. Author unknown to me
    Do what you feel in your heart to be right; for you'll be criticized anyway-Eleanor Roosevelt

  22. #22
    Junior Member IshtarsMom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    SW Missouri
    Posts
    270
    So many sides to this coin...Manic Depression is one of the most horrible illnesses anyone can go through....the manic side is genius, pure unadulterated genius...ideas and talent flowing so strong and fast it's like heaven on earth, the high of all highs..Then it cycles and it is this emptiness not earthly problems we all face that sends someone into the depths of hell and blackness...they become addicted to drugs and alcohol trying to duplicate the highs but it doesn't work...

    My dad had this form and it was scary growing up never knowing which side would be there. There is a tv series that is hard to watch but I find very compelling having dealt with this. It is "Black Box"...If you can be open and non judgmental of her you can gain valuable insight.

    I too suffered from depression most of my life...until of all things a neurosurgeon did some blood tests. Don't think anyone before had ever checked the B-12 levels in my blood...Somehow my body doesn't produce the enzyme needed to convert it...I started taking the shots because that is the only way of absorbing it and I have been depression free for the last several years...sure I get, mad, sad and all the other emotions but not the dark side as it was before. Our mdr in this country is set too low for B-12...ours is 180 min...in Japan it is 600...quite a difference. Won't work for everyone but sure worth a simple blood test to see.

    My heart goes out to all those who suffer....the ones with the illnesses and the ones who love them...

  23. #23
    Super Member ptquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    6,496
    "Way back when - some religions believed that mental illness was called by demons. " - wish it WAS, way back when - I just watched a documentary on the Cheshire (CT) murders - the young man who did them was brought up in a religious family and was prevented from getting treatment by mental health professionals - his family was going to "pray it away" I guess.

  24. #24
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    23,137
    Where is the line between being able to "recover" (or cope?) on one's own and needing help/medication/supervision to manage to survive?

    To compare mental illness (again - this is such a vague term) to diabetes -
    For a while, and for some, changing diet and lifestyle can keep the disease under control. No one can see it from the outside. But help is usually easy to get and many people are willing to admit they are diabetics. For some, it's a straight line from being diagnosed to insulin dependency. Many people realize that they need the insulin to keep going and if they stop taking it, they will be in trouble. Also, there are tests to determine where one is at in keeping one's diabetes under control.

    Why is there such a leap to comprehending that some forms of depression, for example, may operate a bit like diabetes? there is something operating wrong in the person's system that needs assistance to be stabilized.

    "Snapping out of it" - "Get a grip on yourself" - "What do you have to be depressed about?" do not address the problem or do a thing to make it better for those that are in need of more help.

    I agree that "personal life styles" can and do affect whatever other conditions we may have - which includes our physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual being.

  25. #25
    Senior Member quiltin-nannie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    NW PA
    Posts
    840
    Depression is horrible. A couple years ago, I was very depressed, and didn't know why. I have a wonderful husband, two loving adult children and a beautiful grandchild. I felt useless, had thought of suicide. I would cry at the drop of a hat. My daughter didn't want to "deal with the drama". She has since become a psychiatric nurse, and has apologized for not understanding. My depression, believe it or not, was caused by my thyroid being way out of whack. I had taken pills for years, always had my blood work done, no problems. However, when I finally decided to see my doctor last summer and actually tell him how I was feeling mentally, he ordered lab work and my TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) was 19. Normal should be no higher than 4. We are working on getting it back within the normal range. Had lab work this morning so very anxious to see the results. It's a slow process adjusting thyroid meds, but once doc increased my thyroid med, I started feeling "normal" very soon. My heart goes out to patients and families dealing with this problem.
    Julie
    Good friends are like stars; you don't always see them, but you know they're always there!

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.