Stocking Up

Old 04-16-2011, 07:06 PM
  #91  
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Originally Posted by Krystyna
I use Roma tomatoes to make sauce, but put everything else in there, too, including cherry tomatoes. I stay away from anything but open pollinated. No GM's for me, thanks. As for how many plants, it depends on how intensely you are going to prune which determines yield. I usually grow about 20 plants in 5 gallon tubs and another ten or so in the ground. By the end of the season, I am wishing canning would be just a memory. You can get by with 10 plants for what you want.
How do I prune ? Gee I was thinking I would need about 30 to 50 plants - glad I asked! If I plant every 12 inches & only need about 10 tomato, then about 6 green peppers, 6 cukes, 6 zucchini and a little room for cutting flowers I should be set. Are green beans hard to grow? Do I have to put them on poles or are there short bean stalks? I sure miss my Pop. . . About 100' X100' should do it. What is GM?
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Old 04-16-2011, 07:11 PM
  #92  
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Originally Posted by PurplePassion
Do you have any greenhouses or nurserys around there? People that work there would be the best to ask about good varieties. I start my own seeds in my kitchen window. and always have too many.
Yes, we do, that should be better than Lowe's etc. Is it too late to start my own seeds? My Pop used plastic gallon milk jugs over his plants to get them started - worked like a little greenhouse but I can't remember how he did it. Maybe one of my brothers will remember.
Thanks for your help.
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Old 04-16-2011, 07:18 PM
  #93  
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Originally Posted by Krystyna
Originally Posted by redkimba
If you can't have a 200 x 200 ft garden because you live in a city, you can also check out 'urban homesteading' resources.
We live next to the sea on a barrier beach island. Our house, a tiny cottage, is situated on a plot that is only 40' x 100' and that doesn't leave a lot of room for growing considering that there is also a driveway and garage there, too! Nonetheless, I've grown enough to fill my cupboards and freezers. You really don't need a lot of space. I turned half of the front lawn into a fruit and veggie garden. We pulled out all of the shrubs that don't yield food (except for a butterfly bush that was a mother's day gift) and replaced them with blueberry, goosberry, jostaberry bushes and raspberry canes. There are daylilies in the front border - but we eat them, too, in a tempura batter. These are interplanted with jalapeno and habanero peppers. There is a huge strawberry patch that is interplanted with onions. I also grew cabbages, eggplant, zucchini, accidental pumpkin and banana peppers there. Lots of folks stopped by to look and some asked how to do it in their yards. With water costing as much as Perrier in this town, I have to wonder why I would pay to water grass when I can be watering food!
In the backyard I have lots of 5 gallon buckets where tomatoes grow. My husband built two side by side bins made from pallets. I alternate them each year - one side is compost and the other side is where I grow potatoes. We have grape vines, fig trees, more rapsberries and blackberries and there is plenty of room for peas, green beans, squash, spinach, kale and salad greens, not to mention more tomatoes. I do succession planting to make the most of the space.
Wow! I bet you are a great cook too. Our neighborhood has lots of rules about what we can do on our property. We have a large side area that can't be seen from the street so I think the garden will be Ok. Our next door neighbors are a young couple from the counrty so they may even be interested in sharing part of the garden spot.
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Old 04-17-2011, 02:35 AM
  #94  
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How do I prune ? Gee I was thinking I would need about 30 to 50 plants - glad I asked! If I plant every 12 inches & only need about 10 tomato, then about 6 green peppers, 6 cukes, 6 zucchini and a little room for cutting flowers I should be set. Are green beans hard to grow? Do I have to put them on poles or are there short bean stalks? I sure miss my Pop. . . About 100' X100' should do it. What is GM?
If you have room for 30-50 plants, that would be terrific. 12" is way too close. You'll end up with blight because there's not enough air circulation. 24" is better. When you plant them, put them on their sides. Sounds crazy, but it helps develop better roots. Be sure you put in a good heavy tall stake when you plant. Those little tomato cages aren't big enough. Get some Romas and some heirlooms too. To prune, when they grow, cut off all branches growing at a 90 degree angle to the main stalk. You'll see that the leaves on these are different. They don't bear fruit and take away from the plant's strength. If you eat eggs, save the shells and crunch them up - place around the base of the plant. It will help prevent blossom rot. There is a lot of information about growing tomatoes on the internet. Do a little surfing. And watch out for those horn worms! Ugh! Disgusting!

GM=Genetically Modified

Beans are so easy to grow. You can plant bush beans or pole beans. I like to run rows of chicken wire set on stakes. I plant peas in March or April and then on the other side, pole beans in May and June. You can keep planting them as they stop bearing. It sounds like you have a lot of room to grow so have fun, but don't overdo or you'll spend every waking moment in the garden!

Zucchini - give them LOTS of room. LOTS. If you see a stem starting to wilt, cut it off fast or the whole plant will die from borers.
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Old 04-17-2011, 02:39 AM
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Wow! I bet you are a great cook too. Our neighborhood has lots of rules about what we can do on our property. We have a large side area that can't be seen from the street so I think the garden will be Ok. Our next door neighbors are a young couple from the counrty so they may even be interested in sharing part of the garden spot.
If you have room for shrubs, maybe think about blueberries. They are lovely shrubs that have gorgeous red leaves in the fall. No one will know they're fruit plants! Our city plants decorative kale in the malls in fall and I've found that bright green globes of cabbage look perfectly nice in the front yard, especially paired with marigolds.

Stinx that people tell you what you can grow.
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Old 04-17-2011, 06:36 AM
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I stock up on items when they are on sale
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Old 04-17-2011, 07:32 AM
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I keep a year's worth of basic foods in my house. I learned how to buy and prep from a Mennonite woman. We also have years of freeze dried foods thanks to DH. LOL. DH came home one day with several pallets of the stuff he bought from a small company that sold freeze dried foods. He said the man had to sell the inventory to make his payroll and it was too cheap not to buy and help him out. It says it's good for up to 25 years or more. The kids think it's great camping food.

If you find a copy of More-With-Less Cookbook, it's great for food storage cooking. 500 recipes from Mennonite kitchens that tell us how to eat better and consume less of the world's limited food resources.
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Old 04-19-2011, 08:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Krystyna
Wow! I bet you are a great cook too. Our neighborhood has lots of rules about what we can do on our property. We have a large side area that can't be seen from the street so I think the garden will be Ok. Our next door neighbors are a young couple from the counrty so they may even be interested in sharing part of the garden spot.
If you have room for shrubs, maybe think about blueberries. They are lovely shrubs that have gorgeous red leaves in the fall. No one will know they're fruit plants! Our city plants decorative kale in the malls in fall and I've found that bright green globes of cabbage look perfectly nice in the front yard, especially paired with marigolds.

You are correct because our neighbors are growing weeds and calling it grass! LOL

Stinx that people tell you what you can grow.
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