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Thread: Stocking Up

  1. #1
    Swap Hosts Krystyna's Avatar
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    This morning I perused the latest news stories on www.drudgereport.com which I always do after checking the latest threads here. There was a story about the CEO of Walmart who warned that there will be a steep increase in prices of everything due to the cost of raw materials and transportation. Now I know that many of you stock up on fabric, but how many have been stocking up on food and other goods?
    I will admit to being a "prepper" of sorts. We live in a tiny cottage where space is at a premium, but my husband put up tons of shelves so we could store what we've purchased. We also got a small deep freeze for meats. As I've pulled out meat to use and pressure can, I was stunned by the difference in price just from a year ago. I've also turned half of my front yard into a fruit/veggie garden and do a lot of canning.
    I also make wine - from our own grapes and other fruits. We don't really drink too much, but I figure if things go south, I've got something to barter with.
    I am also one of those "extreme coupon" people and I've gotten tons of food for pennies. We also shop at a restaurant supply house on occasion for cases of coffee, etc.
    A few weeks ago CVS had a sale on tuna. Using my Extra Care Bucks it came out to about 50 cents a can. I now have about 100 cans. Considering the horrible contamination in the Pacific now, I think that the tuna might be worth its weight in gold.
    A while ago I was receiving unemployment benefits and used a good portion for stocking up. My sister, who is a retired financial professional, asked me, "Why don't you just save the money." I thought about it for a second. Then I realized, if I hadn't spent the money on food then, I'd be paying a lot more for the same stuff now.
    So ... anyone else?

  2. #2
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    an advisor on tv said that one who is in their 30's really needs to sock it away for retirement. being an older gentleman, he said that when he was in his 30's, bread was only 14 cents a loaf. see where prices go?

  3. #3
    Super Member donnajean's Avatar
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    If it' on sale & I have a coupon, that's when I buy it. I have shelves in my basement for canned goods, paper & laundry products. I love seeing the totals on my grocery store purchases showing at least a 50% savings.

  4. #4
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    I am a big believer in everything in moderation. Having gone through the Y2K scare ....where everything from banks to water supply was predicted to have issues with the changing of the century. I watched friends and neighbors stock pile everything from bottled water to guns and ammo!
    It always a good idea to not run your household with out a cushion, I'm not going to be going out purchasing any quantity of food supplies as they do have a shelf life.
    I too try to grow some of my food supplies but will problably only increase a small amount of what I grow.

  5. #5
    Super Member dixiebelle162002's Avatar
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    I stock up on items when they are on sale too and try to keep quite a bit extra on hand.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Quiltzilla's Avatar
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    There are lots of stories out right now on the rising cost of ________. Filling in anything in that blank and it works; food, fuel, cloth, gold... All of the stories should have the same headline: "The dollar fell in value". When the dollar is worth less, everything made in other countries costs us more. The reasons the dollar is falling in value is likely to be too political to discuss here.

  7. #7
    Super Member frauhahn's Avatar
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    I've been doing this for the last couple of months. I buy when it's on sale, have a good stash in the basement, and continue to buy, even if I don't need it and the price is really good. It's obvious that we're heading into an inflationary period-it could get really bad, from everything I'm reading and hearing.

  8. #8
    Power Poster sueisallaboutquilts's Avatar
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    I try to be a smart shopper but extreme measures do nothing but make me nervous!

  9. #9
    Super Member KatFish's Avatar
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    I keep well stocked pantry. I have been stocking up on my canning supplies and expanding our garden. DH is starting to complain that "Meatless Monday" is coming around 2 to 3 times a week. lol. He really loves how well I can streach a $.

  10. #10
    Super Member Ditter43's Avatar
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    We are stocking up and trying to become more self sufficient. :?

  11. #11
    Super Member moonwork42029's Avatar
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    I usually have enough on hand for a couple weeks and a little longer on canned items. This was very useful when we had the ice storm in 2009 and didn't have power for 13 - 20 days (had a generator for nighttime allowances).

    they (family) don't laugh quite so much any more since we had everything pretty much.

  12. #12
    Swap Hosts Krystyna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by moonwork42029
    I usually have enough on hand for a couple weeks and a little longer on canned items. This was very useful when we had the ice storm in 2009 and didn't have power for 13 - 20 days (had a generator for nighttime allowances).

    they (family) don't laugh quite so much any more since we had everything pretty much.
    Wow! That's a long time to go without power! I sure hope you own a treadle machine! But your point is a good one - regardless of why you stock up, if you're in a situation like that, I'm sure you're happy to have what you need on hand.

    I went through our deep freeze and pulled out roasts and canned beef stew. Pulled out chickens and chicken breast and canned that too. Now if I'm in a rush, I can open a jar of chicken, toss it with veggies and pasta and there's dinner! The beef stew just needs some thickener and seasoning and voila - instant dinner.

    A couple of years ago my husband saw a neighbor throw out brand new kerosene heaters - complete with instruction manuals. He brought them home and we used them when the power went out for a couple of days. I was initially skeptical because I thought they'd stink, but they didn't and I was warm. We have oil heat and I've used one during the day rather than heat the whole house with oil. We saved so much $$$ on oil that the oil delivery company called me to see if there was something wrong.

  13. #13
    Super Member QBeth's Avatar
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    My significant other doesn't always understand why I buy things we already have when I go to the big box store, BJs. Every month, BJs sends out great coupons and I've saved up to $70 in one trip (sorry, I forget the total beforehand). One time, when he went thru checkout while I continued to look around, he forgot to use the coupons. I made him go to the Service Desk, receipt in hand, to get credit for the coupons. $19!!! He doesn't argue too much any more. :-)

    I think most of us are worried about what the next few years hold. More and more of us are putting in gardens or expanding existing ones. IMHO, I think this is a good thing, especially for passing on these lifestyle alternatives to the children.

  14. #14
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    Stocking up is not a bad thing IMHO. I just make sure to rotate the goods and not buy more than I can use before they expire :D:D:D

  15. #15
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    Hi Krystyna,

    You are very wise to stock up on essential items that your family uses. This should include emergency items and supplies, cleaning and paper products as well, along with bottled water. Possibly even a supply of extra wash cloths for misc. cleanup. Wash cloths can be used instead of toilet paper and then laundered if need be. (Not that I would want to do this, but if no tp was available to purchase what are you going to do, I ask?)

    Get some extra bleach to keep on hand. This can help purify water to use for drinking and for cleaning.

    Since you have invested in a freezer, have you also invested in a generator? Do you have enough fuel to keep it going for a period of time so that more fuel could be purchased or until power resumes?

    Also, it is advisable to have at least a week's worth of CASH and COIN hidden and on hand at your home. In the event of power brown outs, cash can be used to make purchases.

    Just this week I went to get lunch and they were not able to use the register. I had cash in my pocket and got my lunch. She grabbed a piece of paper to record the transactions so she could put them in later when the system was working properly.

    Most of our stores' goods are trucked in daily to restock the shelves. If we have a major earthquake in the middle of the country we could see a severe interruption in what's available on the store shelves. We have been very lucky to have not have many major disasters but I feel we are being warned to do what is necessary to be prepared.

    I encourage everyone to think about what you and your family would, could, can, should do to survive through a major difficulty?

    Pam M

  16. #16
    Swap Hosts Krystyna's Avatar
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    Pam, we're on the same page. I don't have a generator, but do have knowledge of primitive skills to help us get by.
    At the risk of sounding like a nut, here's one more little thing to think about - foraging. I started thinking about the poor people in Haiti after the earthquake there. Everything was gone, just flattened. We are familiar with a few of the families there as our church sponsored the building of a school there. But what do you do if the cities and towns are flattened like that? Would you know how to head out into the countryside and find something to feed your family? How to get water?
    I'm a former scout leader, so survival skills wasn't a foreign idea to me. This past summer my husband and I started hiking on our island and in the state parks specifically to identify wild foods and to learn how to prepare them. We had a lot of fun, got in some good exercise, and we had a ball trying out new foods. Quite a surprise for my "meat and potatoes" guy.

  17. #17
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    I am using my dehydrator more to dry what is in season. funny story here about stocking up on things. during ww2 my grandmother's sister who lived over the hill from here, saved up her sugar ration and stored it in sacks burried down in the hay in the barn. the 60's come along and Dad and my brother were over there helping fix the barn. First had to clean out the old hay on the bottom and low and behold here was Aunt Bo's stash of sugar!!! Hard as a rock but still there. How the critters and bugs stayed out of it I do not know. I plan on a little bigger garden and canning more what I do not dry. size of the garden depends on how strong the wells hold. There is only two of us now but mom will be moving back in with us. We are prepared. Living way out here you have to be. Had no power three days last week. We have friends and relatives that laugh at us for stocking things but hey, we are self sufficent and if turns out don't needd it like the y2k did, then won't have to be spending alot on groceries for awhile will we? My daughter was just out of college then and started working in San Francisco. Her and boyfriend would come up to see us and shop at "Moms"

  18. #18
    Super Member greenini's Avatar
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    We live in a condo now, so no garden here. But I have always kept at least a 2 to 3 week supply or more of food, including dry and canned beans. As campers, we also have propane stoves (yes, plural), extra propane, we do have a small generator, but it's not going to last for very long, lots of camping lanterns, flashlights, an emergency radio.

    We should get water to keep, but with us, space is a big issue. If we get any warning we can fill the van's tank and live off that for a while. Or as they used to say, fill the tub up...I haven't seen those kind of emergency instructions in a long time.

  19. #19
    Power Poster CarrieAnne's Avatar
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    I dont have much money to stock up on extras, but my garden will be bigger, and I do know how to forage, lol! Soon dandelions and aspapragus will be popping up everywhere!

  20. #20
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    I was saddened when I saw lines of Japanese people standing in line waiting for water---the DAY after their earthquake. Perhaps they had some, but it was buried under their homes? But we all should have enough to sustain our own families for at least 72 hours. Among other things we do, I rinse out soda bottles and refill with water. One two liter bottle will flush the toilet! (as I learned after an earthquake in 1992). By the way, I also found out the hard way that reusing gallon milk jugs does not work. Sure made a mess on my closet carpet! The news reports can scare us, but I feel better being a little prepared.

  21. #21
    Swap Hosts Krystyna's Avatar
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    TooManyCats - we stocked up around Y2K and I'm glad we did because I lost my job. Those extra things sure came in handy.

    Greenini - If there is a common garden area, you might still be able to grow a few things. When my mom sold her house and moved into senior housing she really missed her garden. I brought some huge pots, filled them with dirt and tomato, peppers, basil and they were a hit. The New York Times actually did a story on it. Too many of the other residents started helping themselves, so she put in more pots behind the shrubs and had a secret garden of cucumbers, green beans and more!

    CarrieAnn - wild asparagus! Wow! what a treat. I found a huge growing area for beach plums and we were dragging them home by the 5 gallon tub-fulls. Lots of preserves and they were sooooo good right off the bush.

    Lynn, yup. Those milk containers will do you in. I am also filling soda bottles. I cleaned out a kitchen cupboard that was full of pots and pans that I rarely use. They went into the garage and now I have a good stock of water.

    These are strange times.

  22. #22
    Junior Member keesha_ont's Avatar
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    I'm guilty of stocking my stash....

  23. #23
    Super Member Aurora's Avatar
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    I have always stocked up when things were on sale. This habit has helped me more than once over the years when money was short.

    I learned a valuable lesson during the ice storm of 2009. I do not plan to maintain a freezer full of food, I plan to can my meat and vegetables from my garden for storage.

    When I return to my homestead in the next month or two, I will live without electric. It really is not that difficult. I have a treadle and plan to convert an extra 66 Red Eye to hand crank.

    It is actually fun. I am prepared to live using very little electricity. I have two springs and a small cave on my property.
    I camped for several years in preparation for living with less.

    Stocking up is what I have always instintively done. Life is full of things I have no control over. But I can control how I react to them and I find it easier if I am prepared, there are fewer surprises.

  24. #24
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    One of my main concerns is the expiration dates on stored foods. And cans can still become contaminated and/or lose their seals. Something to take in consideration when stocking up. Always something!!!

  25. #25
    Super Member Quiltbeagle's Avatar
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    We live paycheck to paycheck and can't afford to stock up on things. The prices are just crazy! Green peppers were $1.49 EACH last week! No, I couldn't get any.

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