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Thread: Wheat free diet

  1. #1
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    Anyone else on a wheat free diet, if so how do you make a sandwich for lunch. Also any breakfast ideas. Dinner is covered. I just never realized I ate so much wheat, it seems to be in everything I eat.

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    Senior Member SparkMonkey's Avatar
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    We're completely grain-free in our house. For take-to-work lunch it's usually a salad with lots of different veggies, boiled egg, some kind of meat, and just a bit of olive oil and vinegar. Sometimes nuts or sunflower seeds. The oil and protein help keep it satisfying (veggies alone will fill up your stomach but won't keep you going for long). If it's cold weather, soup, stew, or chili happens a lot too.

    At home where it's easier to cook, lunch is usually leftovers or a pared-down dinner (steamed veggies and a simple piece of meat, something that cooks quickly like chicken breast tenderloins or pork chops).

    If you're wheat-free, bread is just really hard to get right. I have a friend with celiac disease who tried all sorts of different gluten-free breads and was disappointed with every one. Pasta wasn't so difficult to find, but bread was a no-go. We don't eat any grain at all, so it's simply not a question.

    Hope this helps!

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    Super Member Jennifer22206's Avatar
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    I'm not on a wheat free diet, I don't like bread. I'll make a sandwich between two pieces of lettuce (cold sammies anyway). I do the same with veggie burgers/turkey burgers

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    Senior Member SparkMonkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer22206
    I'm not on a wheat free diet, I don't like bread. I'll make a sandwich between two pieces of lettuce (cold sammies anyway). I do the same with veggie burgers/turkey burgers
    Oh yeah, we've done that too! Cabbage leaves work as well. You just need to be sure the sandwich fillings aren't too messy (sloppy joes, for instance, would get a little gross ;)).

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    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I have a grain free bread recipe made from spinach. It's great sliced thin for sandwiches. It's carb free too. Let me look for the recipe.

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    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    Found it in my computer recipe file, I was hoping I saved it on computer, saves me a lot of typing.
    I posted it on the recipe page.

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    A friend also said it was easier to just not be bothered about bread. She used rice crackers instead. I was kinda hoping for bread.
    Quote Originally Posted by SparkMonkey
    We're completely grain-free in our house. For take-to-work lunch it's usually a salad with lots of different veggies, boiled egg, some kind of meat, and just a bit of olive oil and vinegar. Sometimes nuts or sunflower seeds. The oil and protein help keep it satisfying (veggies alone will fill up your stomach but won't keep you going for long). If it's cold weather, soup, stew, or chili happens a lot too.

    At home where it's easier to cook, lunch is usually leftovers or a pared-down dinner (steamed veggies and a simple piece of meat, something that cooks quickly like chicken breast tenderloins or pork chops).

    If you're wheat-free, bread is just really hard to get right. I have a friend with celiac disease who tried all sorts of different gluten-free breads and was disappointed with every one. Pasta wasn't so difficult to find, but bread was a no-go. We don't eat any grain at all, so it's simply not a question.

    Hope this helps!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo
    Found it in my computer recipe file, I was hoping I saved it on computer, saves me a lot of typing.
    I posted it on the recipe page.
    Looks interesting,I may try this.

  9. #9
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
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    Your natural food has gluten free breads. I need mine gluten and yeast free, so it's more difficult, but I found one that makes great grilled cheese sandwiches and isn't bad for others.

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    There are several gluten-free grains around, none seem to equal bread but I'm trying. I decided to go grain free last month after realizing that several in my family (both my daughters included) are either allergic or are affected by grains. Not too much weight lost but my belt is getting larger.
    Just got this in my mail box this morning. Check out the Dr. Mercola website. Interesting..and in some cases I do believe it.
    We have some addiction prone members of our family
    ----------------------------
    Dr. Mercola....

    Why Food Addictions Can be as Strong as Drug Addictions
    An addiction process that rivals that of prescription and recreational street drugs may explain why you're having a hard time giving up sugar, bread and pasta.

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    Udi's gluten free bread is in our grocery stores. Check online also. It is a good sandwich bread. I prefer Sammi's millet bread that I get from the Health Food Store. Every now and then I use a Bob's Red Mill gf bread ix and have warm fresh bread. I do not like the shelf stable breads like rice and tapioca bread found in a lot of stores. I do not think it is hard to find but it is pricey. Well all gluten free specialty foods are pricey but you gotta eat.

    Rita

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    My grocery store has a couple of gluten free sections. Ezekiel Sprouted Grain Bagels are great, Udi's bagels are pretty good (I eat them with cream cheese and green olives). There are also gluten free bread mixes like from Bob's Red Mill. Pamela's Baking and Pancake Mix is great - makes yummy blueberry pancakes! This web site is very good: http://glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.com/

  13. #13
    Senior Member quiltingme's Avatar
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    At Whole Foods stores you can get Rudi bread...closest to a wheat bread that i have found. Does not crumble as much or tadte as sweet as the Udi bread. Kink of funny the names, don't you think?

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    I just noticed that you are Canadian. Check grocer's freezer for Kinnikinick gf bread. It is very good.

    Rita

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    Quote Originally Posted by ritamaew
    I just noticed that you are Canadian. Check grocer's freezer for Kinnikinick gf bread. It is very good.

    Rita
    Rita, thank you for that name brand. I will certainly look for this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cherylsea
    My grocery store has a couple of gluten free sections. Ezekiel Sprouted Grain Bagels are great, Udi's bagels are pretty good (I eat them with cream cheese and green olives). There are also gluten free bread mixes like from Bob's Red Mill. Pamela's Baking and Pancake Mix is great - makes yummy blueberry pancakes! This web site is very good: http://glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.com/
    Didn't know about pancake mix. If all else fails bread wise I can try crepes as wraps. Sounds good already as I love wraps.

  17. #17
    Super Member MacThayer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by true4uca
    Anyone else on a wheat free diet, if so how do you make a sandwich for lunch. Also any breakfast ideas. Dinner is covered. I just never realized I ate so much wheat, it seems to be in everything I eat.
    If you're intolerant to wheat, then it's likely you're intolerant to gluten. Gluten intolerance is an inability to tolerate wheat, rye and barley. Since we don't generally have that much exposure to the last two grains, the one we notice most is wheat. Even if you're not intolerant to all three, one thing is certain: if you stick to a gluten free diet, you will not eat wheat.

    The first thing to do is "google" gluten, or gluten intolerance, or Celiac disease, or gluten free, or something else you come up with on one of your searches. There is a ton of information available about this on the web.

    I do like some of the commercially prepared breads, especially Udi's. They do tend to go stale quickly, so what I do is buy a loaf, break it into usable quantities for a day or so, freeze it in sections, and take it out as needed. That keeps it fresh. If you'd rather make it from scratch, King Arthur Flour has devoted an entire section of its catalog to gluten free flours and baking mixes. They also have an on-line store at: http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop

    Two of the best stores where I find gluten free products are: Whole Foods and Trader Joes. I don't know if they're in Canada, but they're all over the US. You can also find a lot of Gluten Free outlets on line. Remember, organic does not mean gluten free. Organic contains a lot of whole wheat.

    Be careful of the places you can find hidden gluten. Hamburger, even turkey burgers, and similar products, can contain hidden 'binders' that contain gluten, e.g. wheat. I buy meat or turkey and grind it myself. Sausage contains breadcrumbs, e.g. wheat.
    Sea food sticks, and similar products, contain binders that contain wheat. Ovaltine, Horlicks and instant coffee contain wheat. Wheat flour is often a hidden ingredient in ice cream, dairy desserts (including the kind you buy in a packet and make up at home) and even some butters. Many cheaper makes of ketchup, mayonnaise and salad dressing are thickened with flour (e.g. wheat). More expensive brands may not be immune either. That's why I stick to Olive Oil and Wine or Cider Vinegar for salad dressing. You'll often find gluten in low fat or no fat versions of products, to make them less watery. For example: yogurt, soft cheese, mayonnaise, salad dressing and margarine.
    Pre-packed grated cheese is coated in flour to keep it from sticking together. Italian hard cheeses you grate yourself, like Parmesan and Romano, are usually OK. On the other hand, the mold in most types of blue cheese is started on bread, so blue cheeses, including stilton, are off-limits.

    Watch out for sauces, unless you know exactly what's in them. Obviously, anything coated in batter or breadcrumbs, contains flour, e.g. wheat. Watch out for fish products! Ask how they were packaged. They are usually packaged in a sauce thickened with flour for transport. Flash frozen or packaged in water is the way you need them.

    You might think potatoes are safe. A simple home baked potato is safe. But french fries and roast potatoes are usually covered by a very thin batter (flour + gluten + wheat) to improve the flavor. Other products such as wedgies, croquetes and even mashed potatoes are either coated with batter or contain flour or breadcrumbs. If you're eating out, ask. If you're buying, read the label.

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is manufactured with gluten. Watch out for it. It may be listed on the label as merely a 'flavor enhancer'. If you go to a Chinese Restaurant, tell them, no MSG. I've had good luck with that. The Chinese are brillant at flavoring food, and can do it without MSG and soy sauce.

    Soy sauce is made by fermenting soy beans and wheat together, so it's off limits. There is a gluten/wheat free brand, and it's often called Tamari Sauce. With Gluten free being so big these days, it also often says: Gluten Free right on it.

    Rice Krispies are, unfortunately, flavored with malt made from barley, and are therefore not gluten free. I'll leave it up to you to decide if you want to take a chance on this one.

    Malt and Malt Extract are derived from wheat. This is sometimes listed as maltase or malto-dextrin. Also avoid malt vinegar.

    Any alcoholic drink is made from grain -- beer or whisky, for example, contains gluten, although they have now come out with gluten -free beers. You have to look for them. Most people can drink wine and sherry.

    Many brands of makeup and toothpaste contain gluten. I just went a round with a sore mouth, and it was the gluten in my toothpaste. My pharmacist helped me pick out a brand that did not contain gluten, and I'm healing now. If your makeup isn't bothering you, don't worry about the gluten. But if your face is breaking out, or something: a rash, eczema, etc., then check into gluten free make up.

    Even medicines may contain gluten, used as a thickener or a binder. Make sure you tell your doctor that you are gluten intolerant before he/she prescribes medication. They can put that right on the script, and the pharmacist will make sure you don't get anything containing gluten (or wheat, whichever you prefer).

    But I think you can see why using "gluten intolerance" will keep you away from wheat while out in the world. If it ends up you are not intolerant to rye and barley, you can use those at home, perhaps in the bread you are making, and just use the substitutions for the wheat flour.

    As for my eating, since I am gluten intolerant and also allergic to milk, it makes me very alert to my diet. For breakfast, I eat scrambled eggs with vegetables added. Or grilled tomatoes and mushrooms with a poached egg. Or gluten free oatmeal mixed with gluten free cereal and whetted down with a mixture of soy based vanilla yogurt and vanilla Almond milk, plus a few almonds sprinkled on top, and tea. Always tea. Earl Grey is my favorite tea. There are also breakfast bars available. I like the blueberry and the cherry. For lunch, often a salad. Or some gluten free, milk free soup, and perhaps toast. Or a sandwich -- I have a deli that promises gluten free meats. I wanted to try the vegetarian cheese, but found it contains casein, a protein in milk! Geez! So it's meat and vegetables on my bread, but mostly vegetables. Sometimes I just have vegetables for lunch. Dinner is meat/fish/some kind of protein, vegetables, and some kind of carbohydrate. So I think I eat a well balanced diet. I don't snack much, perhaps a fist ful of almonds if I'm late on a meal, but that's all.

    Sorry to have nattered on so long here, but this is a subject dear to my heart, and you sounded like a newbie. Please, go out on the web and find out more. There is much more you need to know. And if you need me, just PM me. I'll be happy to tell you anything I know. Best of luck to you.

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    MacThyer, thank you so much for all this info. I haven't gotten my test results back yet. Dr. suggested I try wheat free for 48 hrs. I've just tried it for one day & gosh I'm feeling better already. When he suggested this I just rolled my eyes thinking yeah right. Now I'm thinking he very well maybe right.Seems my morning cherrios with yougart is the main enemy.

  19. #19
    Senior Member SparkMonkey's Avatar
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    You'd be surprised what sorts of things can be caused by food. Wheat can cause inflammation in people who aren't necessarily intolerant, and it can manifest in really odd places. A friend of mine gave up grain and within a couple weeks his asthma was vastly improved, and a ganglion cyst on his wrist was completely gone. Boyfriend gave up grain and six months later shaved over half an hour from his previous best marathon time (which, if you don't know much about running, is pretty major). When I gave it up, the puffiness under my eyes disappeared in a matter of days and I stopped burping so much.

    It's not for everyone, but the people I know who have gone grain-free have only had positive results, even if it's just weight loss. Wheat is definitely the worst offender, but most people don't need all the carbs in grain anyway. I now believe that if you have any mysterious health issues, diet is one of the first places you should look for improvement.

  20. #20
    Super Member MacThayer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by true4uca
    MacThyer, thank you so much for all this info. I haven't gotten my test results back yet. Dr. suggested I try wheat free for 48 hrs. I've just tried it for one day & gosh I'm feeling better already. When he suggested this I just rolled my eyes thinking yeah right. Now I'm thinking he very well maybe right.Seems my morning cherrios with yougart is the main enemy.
    Just a word of caution here about those test results. They may come back negative. Mine did. I'm in a support group, and at least half of the people there had negative lab tests. Yet if I were to eat gluten, I would get sick. I know this because less than a month ago, I accidently bought some cereal with real oatmeal in it, and didn't realize it, and couldn't understand what was making me sick until I found it. Then I felt foolish. (Some gluten intolerant people can eat oats, some cannot, and obviously, I cannot.) Stick with how you feel. Even if it comes back negative, stay on the diet a while and see if you feel better and better. That's how a lot of people in my support group found out they were gluten intolerant. And there is medical support for this. If you don't have a true allergy, no antibodies will show up in your blood. If you're just intolerant, your blood may not show anything at all. (Unless it's so bad you have a "leaky gut" in which case food molecules are getting through into your bloodstream, and the body is making antibodies to that foreign substance, and yada, yada, yada. You'll find lot's of explanations. That was the clearest I could find. They get pretty technical). But for some doctors, it's black and white. Tests are negative, so obviously you don't have it. If I believed that, I wouldn't be well today, and I can't tell you how much better I feel. So just do that, go with how you feel, not with just the test results. That's all. Hope you're feeling better soon.

  21. #21
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    I have to have a gluten free kitchen, so I bake our bread. My husband absolutely will not eat anything with tapioca flour in it. He cannot abide the taste. I bought a new bread machine that has a special cycle to bake gluten free bread and now it is easy to do. There are a few good boxed bread mixes on the market, you just need to try them and see which ones you prefer. Another idea is to make tortillas instead of sandwiches. Just put your hamd and cheese, or bacon and tomato on the corn tortilla and fold and eat. About the only thing we haven't found a substitute for that we are happy with is a non-wheat pasta. We have completely given pasta up and now do not miss it.
    If you can tolerate oats, then 5 Minute Brand Oatmeal is gluten free, absolutely no cross contamination in their factory. My husband eats it with no problem. That is the only brand he can tolerate. I called their company and checked about their processing; it's safe.

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