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Thread: If you do FMQ, you need to watch this video

  1. #1
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    If you do FMQ, you need to watch this video

    I have not done FMQ yet but I'm wanting to learn so I started watching youtube video's on the subject. I am so amazed at how this guy does it and he makes so much better sense then what I see others doing. I think I will try his way first to see how it goes. SInce I already have problems with bulging disks in my neck, I'm thinking this will be a lot better.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&v=...ture=endscreen

  2. #2
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    Thanks for the link. I would've thought I'd watched ever FMQ video on YouTube by now, but I'd missed him!.

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    Senior Member didi's Avatar
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    Thanks, for the link.

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    Thanks for the link. I have used a similar method and always thought I was wrong - guess I was worried too much about the quilt police. The gripper looks like a good tool - can't resist a new toy.

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    Thanks - there are so many tutorials there that I MUST look at.

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    Thanks for the link....,

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    Checked out the Martellinotions.com site for the free motion gripper rings. Wow! Pricy. Great idea, but a bit rich for my blood.

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    thanks for the link. I will try anything to stop the tension in my shoulders.

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    I would love to try the rings, but, they are just a little pricey for this gal. Hubby & I will have to put our noggins to work & see what we can come up with. Shouldn't be that hard. Thanks for sharing this.
    Vonda-Texas MiMi of 4 Beautiful Grandbabies

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    Super Member Sunnie's Avatar
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    I have got to try this as my shoulders usually end up killing me.
    Sunnie
    a dog show & quilt addict
    www.buckhollow.net

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    Looks like a neat tool. Maybe they will have at quilt show I am going to.

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    What a great, simple idea. However the price tag is a killer for me. If anyone thinks of a way to do this without the huge price tag, let me know. Thanks for sharing.

    Linda

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    Wow when I saw the video I thought that's what I've been doing just practicing. I also use the cardboard tubes from the boxes of wax paper, foil, etc., to help roll the fabric and the shelving (non skid) helps to keep it in place. you can adjust the non skid as you go along. Instead of that ring that he uses, just get an embroidery hoop and attach the non skid shelving to the bottom.

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    Thank you love his technique and he has the same machine as me so it makes it much easier to follow.

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    Uh oh... now I've fallen in love with that Martelli ring and it's WAY out of my price range!!!!!!!! Maybe I can improvise one with an embroidery hoop?
    http://www.craftsy.com/user/333534/pattern-store?
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    Checked out the Martellinotions.com site for the free motion gripper rings. Wow! Pricy. Great idea, but a bit rich for my blood.[/QUOTE]


    I wrapped an embroidery hoop... maybe an 8 inch one, with that rubbery mat stuff that makes things not slip... sort of a open weave plastic stuff.... If you put it on your machine without the foot attached it does a similar thing as that gripper ring. (Then reattach the foot.... Just remove for room to get it under the foot!) Pretty cheap too, and I already had the hoop. Good luck. I think my problem is that I was trying to learn with the bigger patterns, and thought I would then move to smaller ones, but honestly, I think the smaller patterns are easier and maybe you then move UP to being able to do the larger, more open patterns. You have to move the quilt so much more with the larger patterns.

    think I am going to try that.... Christine
    Last edited by MissQuilter; 05-24-2013 at 10:27 AM. Reason: sorry, missed a step
    <a href="http://www.mylivesignature.com" target="_blank"><img src="http://signatures.mylivesignature.com/54489/336/AFDCC36A59CDFF42A211209DA03F222E.png" style="border: 0 !important; background: transparent;"/></a>

  17. #17
    amh
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    Thanks for the link. Ergonomics was beaten into me in secretarial school in the olden days, and the exercises to relieve the kinks when they started up. Those positions and exercises have helped me greatly through the years.

    Someone mentioned their shoulders just killed them. Try a higher chair, so you arms are somewhat hanging down. This stops you from strunching up your shoulders. If you start getting that pain spot in your neck. Stop sewing. Chin up, move your head to look over your right shoulder and give things a stretch, then to look over your left shoulder and give things a stretch, then (do the chicken stretch) with your head facing forward and your shoulders still stick your chin forward -- same movement a chicken makes with their head when they are walking around. Short chin stick outs forward. Repeat all three a couple of times. If you do that every half hour or so, and have your work at a good comfortable height, it will really help the sore shoulders.
    Aileen
    Saskatoon SK Canada

  18. #18
    Senior Member donna13350's Avatar
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    I bought the "fabulous fabric glide"...
    http://www.createforless.com/The+Gyp...FbFAMgodKDYAqQ

    they are just about the same as the martelli, but cheaper....they have little rubber knobby points on the underside that grip your fabric. I don't use them..they work ok, just like on the video, but I never could get used to not having my hands on the quilt! I was constantly stopping and checking to see if I had a fold or a ripple on the back...I never could understand why they sell 2 in a package! the difference in size is less than an inch...maybe 2 people could buy one set and split the cost..that would make them super affordable!

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    Quote Originally Posted by amh View Post
    Thanks for the link. Ergonomics was beaten into me in secretarial school in the olden days, and the exercises to relieve the kinks when they started up. Those positions and exercises have helped me greatly through the years.

    Someone mentioned their shoulders just killed them. Try a higher chair, so you arms are somewhat hanging down. This stops you from strunching up your shoulders. If you start getting that pain spot in your neck. Stop sewing. Chin up, move your head to look over your right shoulder and give things a stretch, then to look over your left shoulder and give things a stretch, then (do the chicken stretch) with your head facing forward and your shoulders still stick your chin forward -- same movement a chicken makes with their head when they are walking around. Short chin stick outs forward. Repeat all three a couple of times. If you do that every half hour or so, and have your work at a good comfortable height, it will really help the sore shoulders.
    ROFLMBO I know this is not a funny thing and yes it works but reading it and using this old imagination of a chicken/person doing it just cracked me up.

    I am a very short person (almost 5' not quite) and I have had to make my own sewing tables for my machines because in order for my legs not to hurt dangling off the front of the chair it can only be about 16 1/2" to the seat which helps me a lot. So my table top can only be about 25" off the floor for my machine to be at the right height. Yea everyone jokes about it being so short but "It's what works for me" and that's all that matters.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bunbytes View Post
    Checked out the Martellinotions.com site for the free motion gripper rings. Wow! Pricy. Great idea, but a bit rich for my blood.
    I haven't looked at them yet so I don't know what the price is but it looks simple enough to make out some sort of cheap hoop by adding a gripper surface to it. Not sure how yet but the idea is implanted in my head so I'm sure sooner or later something will pop in there.

  21. #21
    amh
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    Quote Originally Posted by seasaw2mch View Post
    ROFLMBO I know this is not a funny thing and yes it works but reading it and using this old imagination of a chicken/person doing it just cracked me up.
    I'm so glad seasaw2mch that I gave you a good laugh. It is indeed a funny looking exercise. I am still working (40+ years of typing every day) and I've taught that move to many people. Currently I work with 16 men and have taught them the move. If I see them doing it I will actually go over and put pressure on that spot while they do the exercise as that really helps work it out faster, and they do the same for me.

    It is a hard exercise to explain, but obviously I was able to do so. ROFLMBO -- I had to look it up and then laughed and laughed.

    If you need to, put a box under your sewing table so your feet are securely planted, what I have done is secure a piece of shelf liner (rug underlay works too) on the bottom of a sturdy plastic container that is the right height for you and put your foot pedal on it. You can put a piece of shelf liner on top of the container and one on the bottom of your foot pedal as well. Nothing moves. Your foot pedal is where you want it and at the right height. I have used a plastic container so it can do double duty and carry things to quilt retreats etc., but anything that's the right height will work. I happen to really like it when I put it down and it stays in place.

    You don't want to have pressure on the upper leg when you are sitting as that can cause circulation issues. You should be able to easily push your fingers between your leg and chair.

    In this day of ergonomics these things are not taught to people. 45 years ago they were. Interesting.




    amh
    Aileen
    Saskatoon SK Canada

  22. #22
    Super Member nygal's Avatar
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    His video was great!! Thanks for showing us.
    When it seems like the world is falling to pieces remember that the pieces are falling into place. We are nearing closer to the End Times.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MissQuilter View Post
    Checked out the Martellinotions.com site for the free motion gripper rings. Wow! Pricy. Great idea, but a bit rich for my blood.

    I wrapped an embroidery hoop... maybe an 8 inch one, with that rubbery mat stuff that makes things not slip... sort of a open weave plastic stuff.... If you put it on your machine without the foot attached it does a similar thing as that gripper ring. (Then reattach the foot.... Just remove for room to get it under the foot!) Pretty cheap too, and I already had the hoop. Good luck. I think my problem is that I was trying to learn with the bigger patterns, and thought I would then move to smaller ones, but honestly, I think the smaller patterns are easier and maybe you then move UP to being able to do the larger, more open patterns. You have to move the quilt so much more with the larger patterns.

    think I am going to try that.... Christine[/QUOTE]

    I love this...we're there is a will there is a way. This might seem like a dunb question but do you attach the embroidery hoop the normal way. Do you put it through your quilt sandwich, or does it just sit on top? Thanks for sharing your ideas!

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by amh View Post
    If you need to, put a box under your sewing table so your feet are securely planted, what I have done is secure a piece of shelf liner (rug underlay works too) on the bottom of a sturdy plastic container that is the right height for you and put your foot pedal on it. You can put a piece of shelf liner on top of the container and one on the bottom of your foot pedal as well. Nothing moves. Your foot pedal is where you want it and at the right height. I have used a plastic container so it can do double duty and carry things to quilt retreats etc., but anything that's the right height will work. I happen to really like it when I put it down and it stays in place.

    You don't want to have pressure on the upper leg when you are sitting as that can cause circulation issues. You should be able to easily push your fingers between your leg and chair.

    In this day of ergonomics these things are not taught to people. 45 years ago they were. Interesting.
    amh
    The box under the table doesn't work for me, I would have to make a platform that would also lift my chair and would be a pain in the butt. I have to lower my table so my arms are not up around my neck when I sit in a proper chair that fits me. I think I said the chair was 16" but it is really 15" from the floor to the seat. Any higher then that and it cuts off the circulation in my legs. So my machine table, which I'm about the make a new one will end up at 24 1/2" off the floor, which will make the sewing platform (the sewing machine sets up another 2 1/2 ") just above my elbows. I have tried many ways to do this and find that this is what works best for me and not have tension on the neck and shoulders. I can sew for many hours with no problems at this height, of course I still take breaks just because we all need to.

    I have heard a lot of people talk about adding the box under their sewing table to get it to the proper height but if their arms are being force to work at a higher level then what is needed then they also should consider lowering the table so their arms are more relaxed. It's the same as standing and working at a cutting table. If the table is to high or to low you will also have problems.
    Last edited by seasaw2mch; 05-27-2013 at 08:02 PM.

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