Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: What makes machine embroidery expensive?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    389

    What makes machine embroidery expensive?

    Iíve heard people say that machine embroidery is expensive and am wondering what makes it so expensive? The machines themselves are expensive, and Iíve see the prices of designs, but are there other less obvious things? Thread? Stabilizer?

  2. #2
    Super Member sash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,531
    Yes and yes, but so worth it.

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Anthony, TX
    Posts
    207
    Blog Entries
    5
    There is also the expense of items you embroider on and mess up! Stabilizers are expensive and you should have several different kinds depending on what you embroider on. Cost of thread is all over the place, along with the cost of designs; anywhere from about a $1 and up. Remember for the most part, you get what you pay for. If buying inexpensive thread, make sure to try it on your machine before buying a wide range of colors. Inexpensive designs can be badly digitized, or be great - also need to try out before buying a large amount from anyone vendor.

  4. #4
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    6,685
    Personally, I don't find it that much more expensive than other types of sewing.

    Sewing supplies of any sort are expensive. You can easily pay $20 for a nice dress pattern that you may only use once, and the notions (buttons, zippers, elastic, interfacing etc) really add up. And fabric isn't cheap either!

    So when someone says machine embroidery is expensive and they are not referring the the start up costs - what are they comparing it to? MY DH has "guy type" hobbies and he can easily spend $200- $300 in supplies for one project. At least he is understanding when I spend that amount to make one quilt.
    My name is Cathy - and I'm addicted to old sewing machines and their attachments.

  5. #5
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,897
    I have been blessed. Yes, I spend more than I should at LQS, quilt shows, etc but it is easily balanced by the fact I use my embroidery machine every day and DH has garden and cars that take every bit as much if not more $.

  6. #6
    Super Member
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Sunny Florida
    Posts
    2,177
    Pre-wound bobbins, stabilizers, hoops, and designs do add up quickly. My LQS offers sale days which is a great time to make extra purchases. I consider the expense of these supplies and EMB classes an investment in me.

  7. #7
    Senior Member juliasb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    waterford Michigan
    Posts
    754
    Blog Entries
    3
    I have 3 different Embroidery machines here and tons of different threads and stabilizers. I use them frequently. I have slowly purchased my threads which I found to be the most expensive. I bought most of them on line and was careful about what I bought. I only purchased one bad batch, that one cost me $12. My quilting machine (mid arm) threads cost me much more than embroidery threads. The most expensive thing I purchased for the embroider was my digitizing software. It cost more than one of the machines! It was well worth the expense. Before you buy your machine however give a great deal of thought to what you believe you will be using it for. I discovered that most of the designs I do are no more that 4" because they are used to accent a piece or be a focal point in a block. Larger pieces can be done by manipulating the piece within a small frame. Of course you can always use the larger frame for larger pieces that is the easy way. I tried both ways as a way to make my decisions. I have made several quilts with embroidered blocks. Mostly for my grand kids who wanted something special like disney characters. I love prewound bobbins too and always keep a supply of them handi. Keep in mind that any project we do when it comes to sewing any more is costly. Our quilts still top the scale as expensive when you figure in the fabrics, patterns and time and quilting expenses. Even your embroidery machine can be used for making a quilt (unless you get just a machine that can only do embroidery work). Happy quilting! (and embroidery!)

  8. #8
    Junior Member SarahBethie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    136
    I think the same holds true for other interests. I encountered similar expenses for gourmet cooking and golf. For sewing and quilting, I purchased all the tools and notions first. Now that I’m taking classes the wisdom of that approach is obvious. I can choose better fabrics because I’m not shouldering other expenses.

    As a rule, I invest in quality tools that last a long time. I’ll pay more initially but the cost balances out over time.

  9. #9
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Hampstead N.C.
    Posts
    1,735
    Blog Entries
    1
    I'm a fan of hand embroidery, only cost is a needle and thread. It's relaxing
    Create something beautiful from scraps.

  10. #10
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7,638
    Blog Entries
    3
    i think the key word, as sarah has figured out, is "investment."
    it helps to figure out which things are purchases and which are investments.
    (full disclosure: i still get the two mixed up more often that i wish. lol)

    when i got my first embroidery capable machine i rushed online and bought a full set of all colors from an inexpensive brand. the choice of brand worked out just fine. i still order from them and only go elsewhere if they don't have what i'm looking for.

    however, years and years later, i still have a drawer full of colors still in the factory wrapping.
    now i just buy what i need for a specific project if i can't find it in my stash.
    the kicker is that i can rarely find what i need in my stash!
    I Quilt, I Nap, I Quilt Some More ... Aaaaah, The Good Life!

    for Newsletter or Digest issues, please contact [email protected]

    To contact me with questions or suggestions that relate to our community, you may email [email protected]


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.