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Thread: $20 to bind a quilt?

  1. #1
    Super Member PamelaOry's Avatar
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    $20 to bind a quilt?

    How is that price wise to machine bind a couch throw size quilt? They said it would be done by machine, both sides.
    “Be the change you wish to see in the world.”
    ~Mahatma Ghandi

  2. #2
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    Is the binding for the quilt already made and supplied by you. Do you know what stitches will be used for the project?

    Be sure to see examples first or discuss how it will look. If all the questions are answered to your satisfaction, then proceed.

    I would be happy to pay it to get a completed project marked off my list. Think of the amount of time the task would take.

  3. #3
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    ​I would want to see samples first. A machine sewn binding is going to be a pain if it has to come off.

  4. #4
    Super Member KalamaQuilts's Avatar
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    I'm guessing maybe to hand stitch down the back side once you put the binding on? Still selling themselves far too cheaply. And I'd want to be sure they knew how to knife edge the corners, assuming the person putting the binding on did it correctly on their side to start.

  5. #5
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    I charge $.25 per linear inch for both hand and machine binding. Yes, I charge the same for machine because in my opinion, machine binding is more of a pain to do and I would rather do by hand. I prefer my customers to just give me their binding fabric and I take it from there, because most of them press it in half first and that's yet another pain. I have to press and starch their fold out before I can use it.

    So, to answer your question, if the quilt was 40" by 50", I would charge $45.00. I have plenty of samples at the LQS for anyone to look at and handle, and lots of references.

    I agree with Kalama - price seems awfully low.

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    My long arm lady charges 30 for machine binding. She has an attachment for her Bernina. I just give her the fabric for the binding and the quilt is DONE when it comes back. I think its well worth it

  7. #7
    Super Member MarionsQuilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peckish View Post
    I prefer my customers to just give me their binding fabric and I take it from there, because most of them press it in half first and that's yet another pain. I have to press and starch their fold out before I can use it.
    Why is that a pain? That's how I do my binding by machine ... I'm just wondering if you have another way of binding that might be less of a pain!

    THanks!

  8. #8
    Super Member PamelaOry's Avatar
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    I think this shop has an attachment for doing it. My choices were; no binding, the first side machined down, or both sides done. I really don’t like doing binding so opted for both sides. I’ll post once it comes back about how well it looks. I didn’t even think to ask to see a sample but they have samples hanging all over the shop so I could have easily looked at them.
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  9. #9
    Super Member GEMRM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarionsQuilts View Post
    Why is that a pain? That's how I do my binding by machine ... I'm just wondering if you have another way of binding that might be less of a pain!

    THanks!
    I do mine without the pressing - I just fold it as I apply it. I find it lays flatter and feeds better to sew it. That's why I do it this way.
    A husband is the perfect confidant to tell your secrets to - he can't reveal them to anyone else because he wasn't really listening when you told him!

  10. #10
    Super Member sewingitalltogether's Avatar
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    I think the LQS here wants $40.

  11. #11
    Super Member Krisb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GEMRM View Post
    I do mine without the pressing - I just fold it as I apply it. I find it lays flatter and feeds better to sew it. That's why I do it this way.
    Another nonpresser here.
    I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world and a desire to enjoy the world. This makes it difficult to plan the day.

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  12. #12
    Super Member PamelaOry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Krisb View Post
    Another nonpresser here.
    interesting. I think I will try it without pressing next time.
    “Be the change you wish to see in the world.”
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    I've been trying the non-pressing for the last year because of a thread here. I never noticed the issues with the crease being off, I think because my binding is a bit larger (I cut at 3") and I typically use rather high loft batts anyway, but I make sure my edge are full.

    None of the problems I was worried about happened. I was afraid that I wouldn't get my nice crisp corners, but they were fine. I was concerned about putting in warpage along the bias, no issues. No more problems making sure both sides were stitched down than by pressing first.

    The only thing I have for pressing the bindings is I like the way they look when they are stored better (I wrap mine around 12" pieces of cardboard for easy counting). Since my tops may sit years before they are actually quilted, it is a consideration. For a more normal person, I'd say -- go ahead, don't press and see what you think. You could save yourself some time.

    I should mention that my bindings are still pretty crisp once I cut them and wrap them on their cardboard. If I was concerned that they were floppy and wouldn't store well and that I had to press them again anyway, I'd probably press them closed for the extra 5 minutes of effort.
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  14. #14
    Power Poster sewbizgirl's Avatar
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    Sounds like a good deal, to me.
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    Boy, was I cheap. For some stupid reason I like doing bindings. A friend at guild didn't like binding quilts, so I would do them for her. She would give me a gift card of $50 for 10 queen to king size quilts. I didn't know what the going rate for binding was, but I found out when we had a program about binding quilts at guild meeting. She doesn't make the large quilts now, and has her quilter do them by machine. lol
    Love to quilt and play with the great grandkids

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    I do not press my binding either, just an extra step not needed. IMHP.

  17. #17
    Super Member cashs_mom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GEMRM View Post
    I do mine without the pressing - I just fold it as I apply it. I find it lays flatter and feeds better to sew it. That's why I do it this way.
    That's how I do mine.
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  18. #18
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarionsQuilts View Post
    Why is that a pain? That's how I do my binding by machine ... I'm just wondering if you have another way of binding that might be less of a pain!
    It doesn't really have anything to do with whether I sew it on my hand or machine - I simply don't press my bindings in half before I sew them on. I find the fabric wraps much smoother around the raw edge of the quilt if I don't press, and it looks and feels nicer.

    If you think about a high school track, the inside lane is shorter than the outside lane, right? Now imagine the binding, as it wraps around the quilt from the front to the back, is like that track. The inner lane (the inside layer of the binding) is shorter than the outside. If you don't press a fold into it, the fabric has the ability to shift and adjust to lay flat and smooth against the quilt. If you've pressed it, it has a memory and will want to stay in that position, which results in the "inner track" being the same size as the outer track, and you end up with excess fabric inside your binding.

    Just my personal preference, to each her own.

  19. #19
    Super Member SusieQOH's Avatar
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    That sounds like a really good deal to me. Whenever I send quilts out I do the binding myself. If theycould do it for that price I would let them.

    Peckish, thanks for the tip. I'm going to try it.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peckish View Post
    It doesn't really have anything to do with whether I sew it on my hand or machine - I simply don't press my bindings in half before I sew them on. I find the fabric wraps much smoother around the raw edge of the quilt if I don't press, and it looks and feels nicer.

    If you think about a high school track, the inside lane is shorter than the outside lane, right? Now imagine the binding, as it wraps around the quilt from the front to the back, is like that track. The inner lane (the inside layer of the binding) is shorter than the outside. If you don't press a fold into it, the fabric has the ability to shift and adjust to lay flat and smooth against the quilt. If you've pressed it, it has a memory and will want to stay in that position, which results in the "inner track" being the same size as the outer track, and you end up with excess fabric inside your binding.

    Just my personal preference, to each her own.
    I usually use bias binding (cut about three inches wide) and I do baste the raw edges together - to make sure that one edge does not creep - but I also do not press/iron that crease at the center.

  21. #21
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    I always press my binding fabric in half. That tiny bit of extra fabric on one side makes absolutely no difference. The thickness of the fabric is minuscule. I think the two layers stay together without shifting a lot easier if they are ironed together.
    Just a little noise from the other side of the fence! LOL
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  22. #22
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    I used to press my bindings. Then I tried binding without pressing it in half before pinning it to the quilt. It seems easier to get the binding on with both edges lined up evenly with unpressed binding.

    Bonus is that one step of the binding process is eliminated.
    A quilt is like a good life. It's full of mistakes, but, in the end, it looks pretty good.

  23. #23
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    Bearisgray, How do you make your bias binding? I have a binding machine that takes bias binding that I would use if I could find a good/better way to make the binding. I assume you are talking about continuous bias binding.
    Last edited by Jaiade; 11-08-2019 at 12:31 PM. Reason: add text
    Jan

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    Thanks for a very clear explanation Peckish!

  25. #25
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    I just cut individual strips - as long as possible, sew together diagonally, and fold them in half. I prefer as few seams in the binding as possible. And yes, I usually end up with a large triangle of fabric left over.
    Last edited by bearisgray; 11-08-2019 at 02:46 PM.

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