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Thread: accu cutter

  1. #1
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    Does anyone have a accu fabric cutter and do you like it?

  2. #2
    Super Member Raggiemom's Avatar
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    My husband just bought me one for Christmas along with several dies. I cut a bunch of 2 1/2 strips as soon as I got it and am itching to try the apple core die. I really like it althought would have loved to had the money for the Studio. But I couldn't have taken that to class so it's a toss-up. If you do a lot of cutting, I think you would enjoy it.

  3. #3

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    Do I understand this correctly, the crank must be turned manually? Some of us also have finger, wrist and shoulder issues.

    The concept of the accu cutter is terrific; maybe one day I will be able to try it out for a few days-do they rent it out.

  4. #4
    Member azgal's Avatar
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    I will be watching this thread too. Wondering if the prices will come down after Christmas??

  5. #5
    Super Member JUNEC's Avatar
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    What is the difference between the accu and the studio besides the size?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by phatquilts
    Do I understand this correctly, the crank must be turned manually? Some of us also have finger, wrist and shoulder issues.

    The concept of the accu cutter is terrific; maybe one day I will be able to try it out for a few days-do they rent it out.
    See if your LQS has one. Some of ours rents theirs out for your use at their store.

  7. #7
    Senior Member bgullett's Avatar
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    I love mine. You do have to manually crank it, but if you have arm or wrist issues, maybe only do a few at a time. Your cutting is cut in half if not more. I just love mine. Just bought a new die last night!

  8. #8
    Power Poster CarrieAnne's Avatar
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    I have the Go! I love it! OurLQSrents out a Studio too, not sure what they charge?

  9. #9
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JUNEC
    What is the difference between the accu and the studio besides the size?
    This question comes up often. If you go to the www.accuquilt.com website you'll see the two systems use different dies. The Studio is built for commercial use and it a permanent system. The Go is smaller and transportable. The Studio is sturdier and cuts more layers of fabric at a pass. The Go is for home use and for people that need to pack it up for travel.

    I own the Studio system as I cut a LOT. There have been a gazillion threads on both the Studio and Go if you use the search feature above you can read up on them.

  10. #10
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    i have all 3 and love them the studio can cut up to 10 layers of fabrics at once the go less the baby go 1 or 2 layers

  11. #11
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I have the Go because it's easier to move around then the Studio. The more you use the Go or Studio the more you realize how useful it it. If you have more then 1/4" - 1/2" fabric waste you are using it incorrectly. One thing to remember is the cutter needs to be lower then cutting table height for proper ergonomic cutting.

  12. #12
    Super Member carolaug's Avatar
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    I totally love the GO!!! The studio is bigger and very heavy...you can buy more dies for the Studio but for me the dies they have for the GO work fine...I love it! it not hard to crank if you use a few layers. If you try to do a ton of layers at once it is harder is harder on your mat. Totally worth the money!

  13. #13
    Power Poster dreamer2009's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phatquilts
    Do I understand this correctly, the crank must be turned manually? Some of us also have finger, wrist and shoulder issues.

    The concept of the accu cutter is terrific; maybe one day I will be able to try it out for a few days-do they rent it out.
    yes, handle turns by hand.
    make sure when using it that it is on a table lower than waist height.
    This will take the stress of turning off of the neck and shoulder.
    Machine needs breaking in so start with one piece of fabric if you have neck, back or hand issues.
    I have those problems and have learned to back down to a level my body issues handle.
    This machine is so much fun though.

  14. #14
    Super Member mpspeedy's Avatar
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    I just got a Baby Go. I love it. Thanks for the tip about lower than table level. I wanted it for making appliques with fusable on the back. I make a lot of Linus quilts and hand appliques just wouldn't hold up. The Baby Go is about the size of a medium to small handbag and not much heavier. I'm trying to finish up all of my Christmas sewing projects so that I can spend more time with my new toy.

  15. #15
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    Would the go cutter be good for making Kalaidoscope quilts? Particularly the triangle dies? Still on the edge of getting a Go.... so don't know if possible. Thanks Cher

  16. #16
    Super Member carolaug's Avatar
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    It awesome for all shapes....you will Love the Go...I would not get the baby go to me that is a bit to small. I wish the Go did larger shapes like a 10 inch square. I use the 6 1/2 inch square all the time. the triangles are awesome and it cuts off the ears. I am hoping for the tumbler die for Christmas...told my son that is what I want...

  17. #17
    Super Member JUNEC's Avatar
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    Do you need to take a class to learn how to use a accu cutter?

  18. #18
    Super Member carolaug's Avatar
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    No...its so easy!
    Quote Originally Posted by JUNEC
    Do you need to take a class to learn how to use a accu cutter?

  19. #19
    Power Poster dreamer2009's Avatar
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    Super easy and I have 2 brain injuries.
    Have learned the best ways to fold fabs so little waste.

  20. #20
    Senior Member All Thumbs's Avatar
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    Wha-a-a-a- Hoooooo! My AccuQuiltGo Christmas present arrived last week and I have been shooting out precise cut squares and triangles ever since. While I have not made anything with them, I sure have been delighted as I demonstrated the process to everyone who has come through my house. :)

    Now here comes my stats and testimony for my new play toy: I am into my Social Security years, have worn out the pads between my knuckles from my stenographer to computer tap dancing years, and arthritis has swollen the rest of me. I have three artificial joints and have had nine operations in my lifetime BUT nothing is going to keep me from quilting during my retirement, especially since I now have an AccuQuiltGo. I do charity and Project Linus quilting and am anxious to get delivery of the dies for strips and rectangles. The basic die that comes with the first purchase only entices one to buy what one would use more (ingenious business ploy for sure). As for the cute animal, etc. cutouts, I doubt that I will order those dies since I am not into applique but I could see where someone would utilize them.

    At first, I thought turning the handle would be difficult but it is not. Hint: I start the die rolling with side with no material if I am just cutting a 4-inch square. My first cuts were six pieces of fabric. Then I experimented with eight layers. Yes, it was hard BUT, after grabbing the iron and pressing those eight layers, everything rolled right through.

    Now here is my additional excitement: If one places right sides together of coordinating fabrics, then after cutting, one goes straight to the machine! No layering of two different pieces and no pinning is required because they have just been pressed(rolled) together extremely tight.

    Blade safety--well, I have yet to feel those surgery sharp points as they are embedded deep within the die-sponge. I will, however, keep this machine and dies in a cabinet where children cannot reach, plus out of the way of anyone accidentally hitting the handle which sticks out. It would have been nice had the manufacturer made a handle lock.

    Good luck everyone.....hope SantaClaus brings you one too.

  21. #21
    Senior Member All Thumbs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phatquilts
    Do I understand this correctly, the crank must be turned manually? Some of us also have finger, wrist and shoulder issues.

    The concept of the accu cutter is terrific; maybe one day I will be able to try it out for a few days-do they rent it out.
    Yes, phatquilts, the handle is manually turned. Check out what I wrote (just above). I imagine if it were electric, the company would have a huge liability insurance package because someone would do something wrong and unable to stop it quick enough.

  22. #22
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by All Thumbs
    Wha-a-a-a- Hoooooo! My AccuQuiltGo Christmas present arrived last week and I have been shooting out precise cut squares and triangles ever since. While I have not made anything with them, I sure have been delighted as I demonstrated the process to everyone who has come through my house. :)

    Now here comes my stats and testimony for my new play toy: I am into my Social Security years, have worn out the pads between my knuckles from my stenographer to computer tap dancing years, and arthritis has swollen the rest of me. I have three artificial joints and have had nine operations in my lifetime BUT nothing is going to keep me from quilting during my retirement, especially since I now have an AccuQuiltGo. I do charity and Project Linus quilting and am anxious to get delivery of the dies for strips and rectangles. The basic die that comes with the first purchase only entices one to buy what one would use more (ingenious business ploy for sure). As for the cute animal, etc. cutouts, I doubt that I will order those dies since I am not into applique but I could see where someone would utilize them.

    At first, I thought turning the handle would be difficult but it is not. Hint: I start the die rolling with side with no material if I am just cutting a 4-inch square. My first cuts were six pieces of fabric. Then I experimented with eight layers. Yes, it was hard BUT, after grabbing the iron and pressing those eight layers, everything rolled right through.

    Now here is my additional excitement: If one places right sides together of coordinating fabrics, then after cutting, one goes straight to the machine! No layering of two different pieces and no pinning is required because they have just been pressed(rolled) together extremely tight.

    Blade safety--well, I have yet to feel those surgery sharp points as they are embedded deep within the die-sponge. I will, however, keep this machine and dies in a cabinet where children cannot reach, plus out of the way of anyone accidentally hitting the handle which sticks out. It would have been nice had the manufacturer made a handle lock.

    Good luck everyone.....hope SantaClaus brings you one too.
    You should know the Go is warrantied to 6 layers of fabric only, for thin fabric. If you push 8 layers through you will eventually break the machine and void your warranty. Quite a few people have been breaking their machines and handles by using it in a way it's not designed for.

  23. #23
    Senior Member All Thumbs's Avatar
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    Oh, thank you so much Candace! I will go directly down to my booklet and read through more details than the initial set-up of fabrics. You are a doll to let me know. No more than six pieces for me anymore. Thank goodness I have only done that twice. It is way too expensive of machine to break a handle and void a warranty! Happy Stitches and thank you again.

  24. #24
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by All Thumbs
    Oh, thank you so much Candace! I will go directly down to my booklet and read through more details than the initial set-up of fabrics. You are a doll to let me know. No more than six pieces for me anymore. Thank goodness I have only done that twice. It is way too expensive of machine to break a handle and void a warranty! Happy Stitches and thank you again.

    :thumbup: Just remember that thicker fabrics like flannel, fleece etc. will be even fewer layers. I believe Accuquilt has been very nice to send out replacement handles , but if it happens to break with a die jammed in it, as has happened to a few people, that's a real pain. And you're unit is out of commission until you can get it fixed.

  25. #25
    Senior Member Momof3Es's Avatar
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    I asked my LQS if they had certain dies for this pattern and she said that it was just simple squares and rectangles and that it would be easier to do by hand? I'm not exactly sure why but ok whatever. I have wanted one since they came out!! I' waiting for the price to drop.

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