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Thread: angle on lonestar

  1. #1
    Super Member crkathleen's Avatar
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    Whats the angle on a lonestar quilt (45 degrees?)? I've have this fabric I would love to use (cheater fabric. haha) to make a quick quilt.
    Thanks

    Oops, wrinkles. haha
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  2. #2
    Super Member dvseals's Avatar
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    yeh 45 :) that's pretty fabric

  3. #3
    Super Member crkathleen's Avatar
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    well crap! haha. the angle on it is like 25 degrees. Far from 45.
    Thanks dv.

  4. #4
    Super Member omak's Avatar
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    I thought the angle for the diamonds were 60 degrees at the wide angle, thirty at the point...
    but, then I am only a girl, I could be wrong ... LOL

  5. #5
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    a 6-point lonestar is made from 60-degree diamonds, or two 60-degree triangles joined along the bottoms to form the diamond.
    an 8-point star is made from 45-degree diamonds, or two 45-degree diamonds joined along the bottoms to form the diamond.
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  6. #6
    Super Member omak's Avatar
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    It is good to be able to understand the forty-five/sixty thing.
    As a matter of fact, I have made one of those half-square triangle quilts, but without the picture, I couldn't figure it.
    so, then the 60 degree angle will either make an equilateral triangle or the sixty degree diamond.
    Now!
    What do we use the 30 degree line on our rulers for? Is that the angle that will make a Spike and Peaky block?
    :D See what happens when you know a lot of things??? :?
    Who started all this?
    I sure appreciate the knowledge shared on this thread and throughout the site.

  7. #7
    Super Member crkathleen's Avatar
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    Thanks Pattrice for the valuable information. I'm glad I decided to check with ya'll before I whacked into my fabric. That would have been the fastest quilt I would have ever made. :lol:
    Thanks omak. I had no clue what a spike and peaky block was until I googled it. I love that block!

  8. #8
    Super Member omak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crkathleen
    Thanks Pattrice for the valuable information. I'm glad I decided to check with ya'll before I whacked into my fabric. That would have been the fastest quilt I would have ever made. :lol:
    Thanks omak. I had no clue what a spike and peaky block was until I googled it. I love that block!
    I have seen some pretty amazing stars and images created with that spike and peaky combination. So, did we decide that involves a 30 degree cut?

  9. #9
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    so, what was the upshot? can crk make a lonestar? it looks right, but looks can be deceiving.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by crkathleen
    well crap! haha. the angle on it is like 25 degrees. Far from 45.
    Thanks dv.
    If the angle is 30 degrees, you could make a 12 pointed start out of it. The math for star angles goes thusly: 360 degrees divided by the point angle equals the number of star points. 360 divided by 60 = 6 pointed star. 360 divided by 45 = 8 pointed star. You get the idea.

  11. #11
    Super Member omak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mytwopals
    Quote Originally Posted by crkathleen
    well crap! haha. the angle on it is like 25 degrees. Far from 45.
    Thanks dv.
    If the angle is 30 degrees, you could make a 12 pointed start out of it. The math for star angles goes thusly: 360 degrees divided by the point angle equals the number of star points. 360 divided by 60 = 6 pointed star. 360 divided by 45 = 8 pointed star. You get the idea.
    FINALLY! Someone who does the number thing and is able to explain how he KNOWS how it functions.
    That 360 degree thing totally escaped me.
    When I was taking trig in school, they started on that THEOREM thing, and I thought - - you aren't kidding me! That is a THEORY, and life is way to short to be learning THEORIES!
    SIlly me! Quilting is greatly enhanced by someone who understands these simple concepts ... and a THEOREM is really NOT a theory ... I don't know what it is, but it has to do with math, so therefore, it has GOT to mean JUST THE FACTS, MA'AM ...
    Thank you so much MY2Pals ... now, what to do with all this new knowledge <rubbing hands together in anticipation ><g>>

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by omak
    It is good to be able to understand the forty-five/sixty thing.
    As a matter of fact, I have made one of those half-square triangle quilts, but without the picture, I couldn't figure it.
    so, then the 60 degree angle will either make an equilateral triangle or the sixty degree diamond.
    Now!
    What do we use the 30 degree line on our rulers for? Is that the angle that will make a Spike and Peaky block?
    :D See what happens when you know a lot of things??? :?
    Who started all this?
    I sure appreciate the knowledge shared on this thread and throughout the site.
    The Spike and Peaky Blocks are NOT 30, 60, 90 degree triangles. The skinny pieces have angles of approximately 63.4, 26.6, and 90 degrees, and the center piece has approximate angles of 63.4, 63.4, and 53.2 degrees.

    The easiest way to get the right shape is to draw the blocks and then make templates. Or use the special ruler.

    If one makes an equilateral triangle with 2 as its base, its height would the square root of three, which is less than 2.

  13. #13
    Super Member omak's Avatar
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    [quote=bearisgray]
    Quote Originally Posted by omak
    The Spike and Peaky Blocks are NOT 30, 60, 90 degree triangles. The skinny pieces have angles of approximately 63.4, 26.6, and 90 degrees, and the center piece has approximate angles of 63.4, 63.4, and 53.2 degrees.

    The easiest way to get the right shape is to draw the blocks and then make templates. Or use the special ruler.

    If one makes an equilateral triangle with 2 as its base, its height would the square root of three, which is less than 2.
    I think I have the rulers you mentioned, and it is good to know that the Spike and Peaky blocks have nothing to do with my regular ruler.
    But ... but .... but :!:

    What am I supposed to do with that thirty degree angle? Why do they put things on the ruler that doesn't accomplish anything?
    Oh ... let's see ... if I figure the 360 degree fact, divided by 30 = 12 ... hmm ... I can't remember which block that has been used with - - perhaps Mariner's star .... I LOVE numbers!

  14. #14
    Power Poster
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    The 30, 60, and 45 degree lines are the most frequently used ones in piecing.

    I believe there are several "protractor" type rulers available. I have one - the only time I used it was to help my husband cut the correct angle for a picnic table leg. Table turned out very nice.

    When talking angles, it is probably better to say a "correct" one than a "right" one, unless that "right" one is a 90 degree one.

    I thought my 60,90, 30 triangle would work for Peaky and Spike, too. But Noooooo. Either draft the pieces or use the Bi-Rangle (I think) ruler.

  15. #15
    Super Member omak's Avatar
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    You know what really gets me?
    With 360 degrees to choose from, you are working from a pattern, and they are offering you a template.
    I can see the block ... it is a spike and peaky, and should be something I can easily measure, but darn! Their template is one or two degrees different than any measurement known to man/woman (as the case may be) .... or they have a "special" ruler you can buy for just a "little more" money ....
    I really should have paid more attention in trig class .... but, no one had a clue that this old farm girl would ever come in THIS direction! LOL ...
    Thank you for explaining the basics to it so that I can understand.

  16. #16
    Super Member crkathleen's Avatar
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    I hope the picture turns out well. sorta fuzzy on one side. As you can see I have the a straight line down the middle of the diamonds but none of the degree markers (30,45) match up. Oh well, I will figure something out.
    Thanks everyone.
    Kathleen
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  17. #17
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    my brain hurts

  18. #18
    Super Member omak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by butterflywing
    my brain hurts
    LOL
    Bless your heart.
    I probably don't understand as much as I thought I knew a couple of hours ago .
    I am looking at the picture, and I am thinking ... if I were going to see if there was an angle on that ruler that woud fit that design, I should be able to lay the ANGLED line on one side of the diamond, slide it down to the point, and where the angled line intersects with the straight line, that is my degree ....
    I'm not sure that if you put the straight line through the middle of the diamond, you could check the angle ...
    but, then ... I am old ... I may not have grasped the main idea of your original question.
    I don't know how much fabric you have, but I am thinking - - maybe, cut it in strips, a quarter inch from a line of diamonds ... an extra thread here and there, and it should look like the lone star block you are after.

  19. #19

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    crkathleen,
    would love to see what you ended up doing with that pretty fabric

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