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Thread: Anybody Machine embroirdered to quilt a quilt?

  1. #1
    Moderator Up North's Avatar
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    I made a quilt, have it sandwiched but found one of the fabrics is almost impossible to get the needle through so I am thinking about doing a machine embroidery design on it. Has anyone done this? Any tips?

  2. #2
    Moderator sharon b's Avatar
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    I have never done this, so I don't know for sure, but wouldn't the back of the machine embroidery show on the back of the quilt ? And that is uh, well, to be honest, not something you really want to see . Unless you take the quilt apart and then put the back on after you embroider, but then you still need to quilt. Just a thought.
    Sharon

  3. #3
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    I am also interested in a reply to this question. I am assuming you would have to use sticky stabilizer, or dissolvable and basting spray. I had really good luck quilting pot holders and coasters this way...but how do you keep a quilt out of the way of the hoop when it moves around?

  4. #4
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sharon b
    I have never done this, so I don't know for sure, but wouldn't the back of the machine embroidery show on the back of the quilt ? And that is uh, well, to be honest, not something you really want to see . Unless you take the quilt apart and then put the back on after you embroider, but then you still need to quilt. Just a thought.
    Sharon
    There are quilting motif's as well as stippling too, available for the embroidery machines. :wink:

  5. #5
    Moderator Up North's Avatar
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    I found a pattern that looks the same on both sides no jump stitches, I tried it with some scraps and it worke but I am not sure about a whole quilt.

  6. #6
    Super Member Maride's Avatar
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    First, if the quilt is not too heavy you can roll it and hold it (never leave it alone) to watch it while it embroiders. Second, with the 3 layers of the quilt you don't need stabilizer, because it is stable enough. Last, either oregon patchwork or emblibrary.com have some patterns just for quilting that show in the front and the back exactly the same.

    I would not attempt with a design that has satin stitches, but if the design is just for quilting, it will work.

    Maria

  7. #7
    Super Member mpspeedy's Avatar
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    I have at least two programs for my emboidery machine that are quilting designs. Since my machine only does a 4" motif I would probably have to do it as a quilt as you go project. In that case I would hoop each block seperately. They are very simple line designs that would look like quilting. I would think that the sandwhich would be enough stabilizing.

  8. #8
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    How would you hoop each block on a quilt, so that each design is lined up correctly on each quilt block, and throughout the quilt??? (does that make sense)

  9. #9
    Super Member mpspeedy's Avatar
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    I would do each block individually. As in any hooping you usually draw a line through the middle in both directions to line it up for the embroidery with a disappearing or washable marker.
    After I had all of the blocks embroidered I would then sew them together in the flip and sew or quilt as you go method used by Georgia Bonesteel.
    I am sure someone has a link to a tutorial.

  10. #10
    Super Member Maride's Avatar
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    I put a pin on the center of each block and the hoop it, attempting as much as possible to keep thet pin in the center of the hoop. Select the stitch to be used and adjust the position of the needle to start at the site where the pin is. Remove the pin (very important) and start stitching. The design will be centered. If the design is almost the same size of the hoop you will need to hoop in the the center because you will have very little space the move it around. Your machine came with a grid that helps you center designs.

    Maria

  11. #11
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    I have used the motifs for a fake trapunto effect on blocks, love how that turns out 8) Still not brave enough to try it on a quilt top :?

  12. #12
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    I took these photos of a quilt one of my patients had. It was done exactly that way, with decorative embroidery for the quilting. Had all sorts of designs as well as sayings such as "You are my sunshine" and "I love you". Because the back was a tiny print, it went together well. I liked it so much I took a bunch of photos. I don't know if you'll be able to see the detail, but here goes:
    Attached Images Attached Images


  13. #13
    Power Poster cutebuns's Avatar
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    I didn't do lots and lots but i did some stippling on a quilt that i did for my mom, I got the designs off of emblibrary.com They have a fair selection of designs that you can use that are specifically designed to quilt with, they come in different sizes and depending on the program you can change the size to fit the square. It was pretty easy.

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    It seems to me that what is being asked here, is not if it would work to do embroidery (such as flowers or animals) in place of quilting, but to use the machine embroidery stitches as opposed to straight line stitching. Most machines these days will do some fancy stitches, and these would give it an appearance similar to the "crazy quilts" made in earlier days.

    I think this would give the quilt a very unique appearance.

    Perhaps try it on something else as an experiment before you do the whole quilt. Sounds like a good idea. Let us know how it turns out.

    June

  15. #15
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    the white sashiko on this quilt was done with the embroidery machine.

    if you want close ups of the sashiko let me know
    Attached Images Attached Images

  16. #16
    Super Member mpspeedy's Avatar
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    I use the embroidery stitches on my regular machine to do my machine quilting in the ditch. They not only cover more area but they help hide points that don't match etc.

    I do have embroidery patterns for my "embroidery" machine that do simple line motifs that are meant to appear as handquilting. For the most part they are designed not to have the tie over stitches that would look odd on the back.

  17. #17

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    I have machine embroidered/quilted quite a few quilts with good results. The thing to remember is to use a bobbin thread that is complimentary to the back and of course is machine embroidery thread. Also, hooping is very important. You want ot be sure that the backing is tight and straight. Good luck!

  18. #18
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    I have quilted quite a few quilts with my embroidery machine and love the results. One thing I have found useful is to put the machine in the middle of a large table so the quilt does not pull on the work. I quilt as you go by sewing the quilt into 3-4 sections and then quilt it. When I sew the sections together there is a little quilting to do but not much. Don't forget you can rotate the direction. I have done several by doing random quilting and it works great and don't have to be concerned about centering. One of the prettiest one I have done was butterflies placed random on a floral top. The one down side is there is a lot of hooping but is still faster than hand quiltinq and the work is beautiful. Really great on baby quilts and table runners. Give it a try. I think you will be happy with the resuls.

  19. #19
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    I have quilted the designs with my embroidery machine, Just remember to have to same colour thread in the bobbin. You have to roll up your quilt quite tight to go through the bed. I also hold the quilt so the weight will not distort your designs. It takes a bit of work but it is lovely when you are finished. Just don't walk away while it is quilting - I have learned this lesson from experience.
    Serena

  20. #20
    Grandma Candy's Avatar
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    I machine embroider one quilt. It was a full sized quilt and I put a leaf/acorn design in the large blocks. I found that because it was so bulky the design got out of the lines in most blocks.....but not in the same place. I'm sure it was because of the hooping. If anyone besides a person who does machine embroidery looked at the quilt they may not notice unless they really studied it but it was stressful for me and I wouldn't attempt it again. Good luck if you try it. If I were to try it again I would use several layers of the stiffy tear away stabilizer underneath each block. Hope this helps.

  21. #21
    Super Member weezie's Avatar
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    I almost always make only bed sized quilts, so they are heavy. In-the-hoop embroidery would work fine, EXCEPT that the weight of the quilt is likely to distort the design (been there, done that). I have even had hoopless fancy stitching (stitches built into the machine) go wonky, caused by the bulk and the weight of the quilt. I've done some successful satin stitching within the quilt border, but mostly when I'm dealing with a whole quilt (already sandwiched), I stick to free motion quilting. It's very versatile (with practice).

  22. #22
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    If you are talking about using them fun stitches on your machine, yes, go for it, but- make sure you have the right needle and a strong thread.. to mark a design you can use masking tape - but- make sure you start in the middle of the quilt and go to one side, then come back to the middle and go to the other side. good luck and show us the results when you are done....

  23. #23
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    and- I almost forgot- dont use a heavy,thick batting..use a thinner batt...instead of pinning the 3 layers together, use the spray- one can goes a long way and it will hold the layers together for a long time...

  24. #24

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    Embroider on thick fabric,? yes I have, just go slow!!.

    :lol:

  25. #25
    Senior Member hokieappmom's Avatar
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    I just took a class and was told that you do not need to use stabilizer when embroidering a quilt, unless you don't want to hoop the sandwich completely. I have seen some beautiful machine embroidered quilts, although I haven't done one myself, at least not yet. Good luck.

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