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Thread: Applique Question

  1. #1
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    Applique Question

    When you are stitching down fusible appliqué with a satin stitch, do you use some type of stabilizer on the back? I am using invisible thread if that makes a difference. I have some tear away stabilizer, but I am feeling lazy about using it.

    Thanks for the wealth of information I get from all of you.
    Lisa

  2. #2
    Senior Member DeneK's Avatar
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    I always use stabilizer. I like Ricky Tims' Stable Stuff for nicer projects. For others, I just iron on freezer paper. Cheap and easy to remove.

  3. #3
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    the nice part about using stabilizer, it sort of inhibits your feed dogs so you can turn way easier. I was watching a craftys class and she was just starching and not using stabilizer, and around the curve, she had to stop and reposition constantly.
    My name is Cathy - and I'm addicted to old sewing machines and their attachments.

  4. #4
    Senior Member IceLeopard's Avatar
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    I use brown paper bags for stabilizer. Once it's washed, they get soft as that cellulose breaks down.
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  5. #5
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    DeltaMS ... it's a matter of finding what works for you and your machine!

    For me, my one machine, I find I need a stabilizer.
    The other (yet the lesser of the two machines) ... no stabilizer necessary and it turns out just fine.

    My sewing machine dealer said tissue paper is often all you need to use.
    Another option, coffee filters!
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  6. #6
    Super Member Doggramma's Avatar
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    Yes, it needs something on the back so it doesn't get all bunchy
    Lori

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  7. #7
    Power Poster Boston1954's Avatar
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    Yes, I think it is essential. I sometimes use freezer paper, but mostly just ordinary 8 1/2 x 11 copy paper.
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  8. #8
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    I never use a satin stitch - it’s a personal thing- I hate that stiff ridge around everything. I use a small zigzag or a blanket stitch and the fusible itself is enough to stabilize the pieces. I would assume using a satin stitch a stabilizer would help with the puckering and drawing up of the background fabrics.
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  9. #9
    Super Member hobbykat1955's Avatar
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    I use wonder under fusible and starch my fabrics and that's enough...never had the issue w/using satin stitch or blanket stitch...

  10. #10
    Super Member applique's Avatar
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    Yup, the tighter the satin stitch the more you need it to prevent tunneling. I do very tight stitching so I use wall paper liner and it usually falls off as I stitch.
    Debbie
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  11. #11
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    I use stabilizer (tear away) with a blind hem stitch.

  12. #12
    Super Member meanmom's Avatar
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    When I satin stitch I find it comes out nicer if I use stabilizer. That said , stabilizer can get quite expensive on a large project. I made a monster quilt all satin stitched and fused down with steam a seam. I used stabilizer on the first block and decided it cost too much to use on an entire quilt. I use good old loose leaf paper as my stabilizer. It pretty much falls off when finished. Tiny pieces left in the seams etc don't cause any issues. I do it all the time.

  13. #13
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    I use old phone book pages paper is thinner and stitching basically cuts it away. I have also used coffee filters.

  14. #14
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    I use a variety of stabilizers because i have a selection for embroidery. Coffee filters and used dryer sheets work and are inexpensive.

  15. #15
    Super Member ILoveToQuilt's Avatar
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    This may be a stupid question, but if you do fusible applique, how to you use a stabilizer in addition? I thought the fusible acts as the stabilizer. Am I missing something? I am going to be starting a fusible applique project and want to make sure I am doing it correctly. TIA
    Anita

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  16. #16
    Senior Member IceLeopard's Avatar
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    Most fusibles don't give you enough stiffness to prevent the background fabric from bunching up underneath, and those heavyweights that do are a royal pain to work with. You pin or otherwise secure the stabilizer to the wrong side of the background. Experiment with a few scraps, with and without stabilizers, to see what suits you best.
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  17. #17
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    Thank you guys so much. I ended up doing a zig zag stitch instead of a satin, and I am not having any trouble, that I can tell, by not putting a stabilizer on the back. I have never used a zigzag stitch on appliqué, but I guess it will be just fine.
    Lisa

  18. #18
    mac
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    Funny thing, in the 70's I did a lot of satin stitch on cotton making aprons for little girls. There was a pillow panel that was a little girl with her front and back. I stitched the front to the front of the apron and the back to the back of the apron and it was all cotton to cotton. I usually starched it quite heavily and pinned it casually. As I said, I did a lot of these aprons and sold them. I never had a problem with bunching or anything, they all came out nice and flat. However, if I was to do that same thing today, I would have to use some sort of stabilizer or paper to keep it flat. My questions is: "What has changed?" I tried doing something like this a few years ago and I had a heck of a time getting through the project. I finally resorted to using stabilizer and I am still scratching my head as to why the difference in the project.

  19. #19
    Super Member Jeanette Frantz's Avatar
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    I have done several applique baby quilts, using fusible to position the appliques and hold them in place long enough to get the stitching done around the outside of the applique pieces. I found that trying to stitch (satin stitch or otherwise) without fusible left a gigantic mess. I have a very good ripper, but I don't want to get too friendly with it!

  20. #20
    Super Member applique's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mac View Post
    Funny thing, in the 70's I did a lot of satin stitch on cotton making aprons for little girls. There was a pillow panel that was a little girl with her front and back. I stitched the front to the front of the apron and the back to the back of the apron and it was all cotton to cotton. I usually starched it quite heavily and pinned it casually. As I said, I did a lot of these aprons and sold them. I never had a problem with bunching or anything, they all came out nice and flat. However, if I was to do that same thing today, I would have to use some sort of stabilizer or paper to keep it flat. My questions is: "What has changed?" I tried doing something like this a few years ago and I had a heck of a time getting through the project. I finally resorted to using stabilizer and I am still scratching my head as to why the difference in the project.
    Today's fabric is much thinner than it was in the 70's.
    Debbie
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