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Babylock Jazz 2

Babylock Jazz 2

Old 03-21-2021, 07:16 AM
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Default Babylock Jazz 2

I recently read about the Babylock Jazz 2. Both the large throat and low price ($699) are very alluring yet I read so many had problems with the motor burning out very early. This was possibly due to a manufacturing malfunction and may or may not have been fixed.

For those of you have this machine, have you had the problem with the motor burning out?

Are there other machines at a comparable price with a large throat?

It looks like quite a bit of set up comes with this machine. My Janome came ready to use other than filling the bobbin and threading. Is the set up difficult?

Are there problems with tension? Sounds like one has to do a lot of fiddling to get it right.

Pictures of it look very "plain." I don't need a fancy machine but the pictures make it look like it does nothing other than straight stitch. Does it do more than that?

Will accessories from my Janomee fit on this or will it only take Babylock accessories?

Any other pro or con comments?

This would be a big splurge for me but worth it for the large throat space, but not so worth it if there are too many problems. My LQS sold Babylock's but they closed a year ago, now I would have to travel 75-100 miles just to try one of these out so most likely I would have to buy on-line without doing a test run.

Thanks!
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Old 03-21-2021, 07:42 AM
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Before you commit to the Baby Lock Jazz 2 check out the Brother PQ1500. Straight stitch machine, large quilting area, mostly mechanical, easy to operate, many happy users. I have two of them. Long story as to why. Both are great.
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Old 03-21-2021, 08:11 AM
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You will want to read this thread, particularly the most recent posts about tension issues Machine with large throat for FMQ
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Old 03-21-2021, 05:05 PM
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I just took a look at the Brother PQ1500. looks like a great machine and I think the the throat size is 9" which is larger than what I have now, but still not quite as large as the Babylock. Are there any others that have a throat comparable to the Babylock?
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Old 03-21-2021, 05:23 PM
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I am interested in what people have to say about this. The Babylock Jazz 2 is so enticing because of the throat space but i don't want to purchase a big headache either. If any sewing machine company would make a decent, basic machine that can also do free motion quilting that didn't cost an arm and a leg, they would make a ton of money! I say that but I must be missing something. Hmmm...
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Old 03-21-2021, 07:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Sharongn View Post
If any sewing machine company would make a decent, basic machine that can also do free motion quilting that didn't cost an arm and a leg, they would make a ton of money!
The idea of industrial machines is kind of scary, but if all you want is a machine with lots of throat space and gives you a great straight stitch and the ability to remove the feed dogs that doesn't cost an arm and a leg, an industrial might be the way to go.

I bought mine for bag making - it's super heavy duty and I could sew saddle leather if I wanted to, but by changing the feed dogs and plate, I can sew fine fabrics, too. I make a bunch of rayon jersey blouses and stretch jeans every few months.

And in January, I set it up with a darning plate and started quilting with it - it's got almost 11" between the needle and pillar. Giant M bobbin, so I can quilt for a long time without running out. I wind the empty bobbin while I'm sewing and I don't have to remove the quilt to change when it runs out, again.

It's extremely quiet and VERY fast - I had to turn the speed way down in order to re-learn FMQ. Base price was $995, but it came to almost $1200 with shipping plus the extra feet, bobbins, extra bobbin case and a couple of accessories I wanted for bags.

It took me an afternoon to set it up by myself, including carrying it upstairs. It came with holes pre-drilled, and clear assembly instructions in a video that went step by step.

You are pretty much on your own when you buy an industrial machine. I had refurbed enough vintage machines that I wasn't
intimidated at doing my own maintenance. They're actually very simple mechanical machines.

Shop around and see if that option appeals to you.

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Old 03-21-2021, 08:42 PM
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I love my Jazz 2. There were some "problems" with the Jazz 1, although I know some folks who have the Jazz1 and they like it. I think its like anything....you can get a lemon with any machine. I have a great dealer that I can rely on, too. Do some investigating, your gonna find that some like it and some don't. The same with any machine.
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Old 03-22-2021, 02:16 AM
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I own the Jazz II but I have not had a lot of sewing time on it. It was not difficult to set up and it is capable of many more options other than straight stitch. I recently read some quilters say that they got better results free motion quilting when they left the feed dogs up. I do not remember where I read it.
I like the fact that it is not computerized. I had some problems with tension when I first started using it, but I was reading the bobbin winding diagram incorrectly.
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Old 03-22-2021, 03:47 AM
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Originally Posted by thepolyparrot View Post
The idea of industrial machines is kind of scary, but if all you want is a machine with lots of throat space and gives you a great straight stitch and the ability to remove the feed dogs that doesn't cost an arm and a leg, an industrial might be the way to go.

I bought mine for bag making - it's super heavy duty and I could sew saddle leather if I wanted to, but by changing the feed dogs and plate, I can sew fine fabrics, too. I make a bunch of rayon jersey blouses and stretch jeans every few months.

And in January, I set it up with a darning plate and started quilting with it - it's got almost 11" between the needle and pillar. Giant M bobbin, so I can quilt for a long time without running out. I wind the empty bobbin while I'm sewing and I don't have to remove the quilt to change when it runs out, again.

It's extremely quiet and VERY fast - I had to turn the speed way down in order to re-learn FMQ. Base price was $995, but it came to almost $1200 with shipping plus the extra feet, bobbins, extra bobbin case and a couple of accessories I wanted for bags.

It took me an afternoon to set it up by myself, including carrying it upstairs. It came with holes pre-drilled, and clear assembly instructions in a video that went step by step.

You are pretty much on your own when you buy an industrial machine. I had refurbed enough vintage machines that I wasn't
intimidated at doing my own maintenance. They're actually very simple mechanical machines.

Shop around and see if that option appeals to you.
Can you tell us what brand is your machine please.
I considered buying an an industrial machine a few months ago, but I was not sure I could do FMQ with it.

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Old 03-22-2021, 12:41 PM
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Originally Posted by helou View Post
Can you tell us what brand is your machine please.
I considered buying an an industrial machine a few months ago, but I was not sure I could do FMQ with it.
https://sewinggold.com/product/juki-ddl-8100eh-x/

I considered an industrial years ago when I was still on this board, but it just seemed like such a mysterious world, and I was skittish.

Then I got into bag making for a few years and *everybody* gets industrial machines if they stick with bag making for long.

I truly LOVE this machine and the guy in Chicago from whom I bought it - Steve at Sewing Gold. They have a YouTube channel - Sewing Gold. They'll put up a video just to answer a customer question.
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