Go Back  Quiltingboard Forums > Main
Backing overage for long arm quilting >

Backing overage for long arm quilting

Backing overage for long arm quilting

Old 02-27-2018, 07:31 PM
  #1  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 14
Default Backing overage for long arm quilting

Hey all
i have some backing fabric that doesn’t quite have a luge overage for a long arm quilter (OT has 2 inches instead of 4). Can I sew a scrap piece to the edges of the backing so they can stretch it sufficiently, and just cut it off once it’s done? I guess I’m not really sure what the purpose of all the overage is.
thanks
Kellie
KellieRiley is offline  
Old 02-27-2018, 07:44 PM
  #2  
Power Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Western Wisconsin
Posts: 12,930
Default

Yes, you can sew strips to enlarge the backing. On my machine, extra is needed so my machine head doesn’t bump into the side clamps that keep the backing stretched. Even more space is needed for ruler work because the added ruler base can be stopped by the side clamps, not allowing the needle to get close enough to the edge of the top.
Prism99 is offline  
Old 02-27-2018, 07:58 PM
  #3  
Power Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Michigan
Posts: 11,235
Default

It sounds like you are not going to be doing the quilting. Call the quilter to find out what their requirements are and if they would accept the backing with the temporary strips. When you drop the quilt off be sure that you tell the quilter that the strips are not part of the backing. Backings are often pieced and the quilter may think it's just part of the backing and quilt it in. You might get an unexpected accent strip in your backing!
PaperPrincess is offline  
Old 02-27-2018, 08:35 PM
  #4  
Super Member
 
TexasSunshine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Kilgore Tx
Posts: 1,883
Default

My machine needs at least 4 inches extra all around the quilt backing. I would not mind someone sewing a few extra inches to the existing border. I try to tell a potential client ahead of time how much extra I need and the reason for it.
TexasSunshine is offline  
Old 02-28-2018, 01:04 AM
  #5  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 4,782
Default

Yes, you can, and as already mentioned, be sure to tell the quilter what pieces are not backing.

The only place you may have a problem is at the bottom of the quilt. The bottom of the quilt will be determined by which way it is loaded on the frame. As a quilt is rolled onto the takeup bar (the bar that collects quilted parts of the quilt as it is completed), the backing rolls up a bit more than the quilt top. Think of rolling a magazine around it's spine and how the page edges don't line up---it's like that. You need more of the actual backing at the "bottom" than anywhere else for that reason. Many longarmmers, myself included, have learned this the hard way when they ran out of backing at the "bottom" before the quilt was done, and had to add more backing, which is not a fun job at that point. Sometimes this will influence which way I load a quilt, so I can have the most extra backing at the "bottom" where it is needed.
On the "sides" the extra backing is used for the tension clamps to clamp onto and not be in the way of quilting, so not as much extra backing is needed on the sides sometimes, depending on the particular side clamps the quilter uses.
JustAbitCrazy is offline  
Old 02-28-2018, 06:11 AM
  #6  
Power Poster
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: NY
Posts: 10,568
Default

Originally Posted by KellieRiley View Post
I guess I’m not really sure what the purpose of all the overage is.
thanks
Kellie
We (LAQ) need the overage to attach to the leaders on the frame and as others have mentioned the side clamps. We also need the extra at the sides so we have a place to test tension.
feline fanatic is offline  
Old 02-28-2018, 06:28 AM
  #7  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Missouri
Posts: 3,389
Default

Agreeing with all the above. I have added extra fabric to all sides of the backing when I was presented with a backing that was not large enough. Sometimes the backing would be just an inch or maybe 2 inches larger than the top. I like to use strips of muslin for this. I butt the muslin up to the sides of the backing, use a large zig zag stitch and whip them together. This way after the quilt is quilted I can snip off the muslin very easy and don't have to contend with a seam allowance along the edge of the backing.
Bobbielinks is offline  
Old 02-28-2018, 08:58 AM
  #8  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Carroll, Iowa
Posts: 2,572
Default

I've done that as I appreciate having at least 4-5 inches on every side but that's just me. Others can do with less.
Snooze2978 is offline  
Old 02-28-2018, 12:08 PM
  #9  
Power Poster
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: NY
Posts: 10,568
Default

Originally Posted by Snooze2978 View Post
I've done that as I appreciate having at least 4-5 inches on every side but that's just me. Others can do with less.
Not just you. I want a minimum of 5" but prefer 6". Have worked with less and it just causes too much aggravation for all the reasons stated above (hitting side clamps, not having enough for top and bottom leaders, etc).
feline fanatic is offline  
Old 02-28-2018, 03:02 PM
  #10  
Power Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Michigan
Posts: 11,235
Default

You got great explanations as to why the extra inches, but as you can see, everyone's setup is a bit different so different needs. It's best to contact the quilter who is actually going to do the work for their requirements for their machine.
PaperPrincess is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
mjpEncinitas
Links and Resources
26
11-28-2019 06:48 AM
Debapril
Main
8
11-20-2017 05:10 AM
thimblebug6000
Main
3
02-12-2013 03:08 AM
gemladi
Main
5
10-29-2011 09:41 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


FREE Quilting Newsletter


SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.