Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst ... 2 3
Results 51 to 61 of 61

Thread: Bad Advice

  1. #51
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Horse Country, FL
    Posts
    7,261
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by karate lady View Post
    I just cannot afford to pay for classes, so most of my "learning" is just trying or reading a book. sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't. Every quilt I make is a learning experience for me and I tell the recipient of the quilt that. So far no one complains and the non quilters say they don't even see what mistakes I am talking about. I guess I put enough love into my quilts to make up for the "oops" part of it. Most of my books come from thrift stores...
    Kudos to you for finding a way to learn new techniques for quilt making. OH, they're not mistakes, they're "artistic license!" No one will know if you don't tell them!!
    "A woman is like a tea bag-you can't tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water." Eleanor Roosevelt

  2. #52
    Senior Member SandySews's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    459
    Someone once told me "There's more than one way to skin an onion". The end result is that it's peeled. I've learned through the years that there's more than one way to do a lot of things with the end result being what it's supposed to be. So we each have to do what is right for us. If you have a method that works for you than use it is my policy.
    sandysews

    A merry heart doth good like a medicine.

    Wisdom is too high for a fool.

  3. #53
    Senior Member GammaLou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    West Michigan
    Posts
    527
    Quote Originally Posted by lfletcher View Post
    There are usually several ways to accomplish the same thing. When I take a class, I always do it the instructor's way, but I may not do it like that again. I have developed my own likes and dislikes, but I do like to learn new techniques so I usually give it a chance.
    Same here. Good to try new things, but they may not always be the 'best' way for me!

  4. #54
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    11

    Red face There are no quilt police

    Quote Originally Posted by DebbieG View Post
    I was told at a Belle Point Quilt Guild meeting, by a man who was our speaker, and who had made 50 quilts in a year.....all from scraps he had or had been given him (he did not purchase any fabric for the quilts).....He told us, "There are no quilt police" and that we can do anything we wanted or could do while quilting!! That has been my mantra.....say it over and over, There are no quilt police.
    One of the first artistic truths I ever learned was when I was 4 years old and drawing on my grandma's kitchen table.
    "There will always be great freedom to create something unique when you take the crayon outside the lines."
    Mariah's Grandmother
    circa 1952

  5. #55
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    35
    I haven't had any of the experiences you have. However I found all to be informative and intresting. Also, I have"nt heard a thing about pressing seams open and again was so glad to read your comment. A great discussion. Carlene

  6. #56
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    776
    Your instructor was giving good advice and it is "YOUR" you tore off too much, not his.

  7. #57
    Super Member tjradj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    London, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,328
    Blog Entries
    1
    I still like the old adage "those who can't, teach." So often I've been disappointed by teachers who try to teach something that they don't know by doing. Just know by reading up on it.
    I find that often the "smartest" people don't make the best teachers because they haven't developed the patience that it needs for most of us to grasp a concept. Often the people who have had to learn things the hard way, or try really hard to learn something, make the better teachers.
    Case in point -- I watched a Martha S. show where she tryed to saw some wood by holding it with her left hand and crossing her right hand over to saw it!!! It really put her "expertise" in perspective.
    I used to be "hot", now it's just "hot flashes!"

  8. #58
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    23,067
    Quote Originally Posted by IdahoSandy View Post
    Your instructor was giving good advice and it is "YOUR" you tore off too much, not his.
    I agree that it may be a good thing to reserve fabric for the border before cutting the smaller pieces.

    At the time, I was not 'aware' enough to be aware of the whole design - and I would have been better off waiting until later - Learn and live -

    I have since learned that I can only 'absorb' so much information at a time - and I have frequently 'learned' by doing things bass-ackwards.

    There are advantages to having some experience - one has a better idea of what will work 'the way it is written' - and what should be tested before committing to the whole pattern.

  9. #59
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Michigan's Upper Peninsula
    Posts
    866
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by GrannieAnnie View Post
    How does cutting across the grain cause stretch? Or am I misunderstanding what you are saying? On the bias??
    The cross-grain, such as from width of fabric, contains threads that aren't as strong as the length-wise grain. If you cut parallel to the length-wise edge of the fabric, you will experience less stretch. Judy Martin suggests cutting the long cabin strips length-wise for this very reason.

    I hope you have many pleasant hours sewing and creating quilts.
    Piecefully yours,
    Kay Susan

  10. #60
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Michigan's Upper Peninsula
    Posts
    866
    Blog Entries
    1
    This has been a great topic. Generally, I enjoy math, geometry, and finding easier ways with which to do something. However, my enthusiasm is not necessarily your enthusiasm. With lots of books on my shelves and the Internet resources, I am able to really have fun perfecting my assembly methods. One important factor for me is that the method be fun and relaxing to me! Secondly, I want to use the material without much waste. Those two things make exploring different methods a challenge which is rewarding on many levels.

  11. #61
    Senior Member Digitizingqueen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Charlotte North Carolina
    Posts
    491
    I am fortunate that I had good teachers, one class I took we were on our own but it was me a a sewing buddy and we spent all day making our projects so it was like a mini sewing retreat....I now teach I have found that caned directions and canned patterns a lot of times have very traditional old school techniques I actually got a kit for a half square triangle quilt that said cut the squares in half and put the two pieces together NOT this girl I'm all about fast easy accurate piecing....

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst ... 2 3

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.