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Thread: Bad Advice

  1. #1
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    Bad Advice

    When the instructor told us to reserve the border fabric before cutting the rest of the pieces. I botched about three yards of fabric by doing that - I tore off 'too much' and ruined the main design.

    Anyone else have 'instructor advice' that you have since learned to ignore?

  2. #2
    Senior Member QuiltMania's Avatar
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    I had someone once tell me "you won't get good results if you don't use LQS fabric". She was very wrong and I'm glad I ignored her.

  3. #3
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    Yes , I have had someone tell me batiks don't run/bleed. I also had them tell me its best to use/cut cross grain , when clearly having stretch would pose a problem later. I have had them even tell me my almost vintage machine will never produce as good results as a newer machine.
    I have learned over the years to filter! and yes my 40 years of quilting can be my most valuable asset in assessing what should be filtered.

  4. #4
    Super Member Havplenty's Avatar
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    when receiving advice, filtering is most important whether you are receiving from an instructor or another quilter. i went to a batik block making class at my lqs. this one particular block that was to be cut from these strips we put together was not going to be totally square the way the instructor was trying to cut it. well she cut it before i had time to protest. of course my block is missing two corners. had i had a moment to think it through, i would have found another way to cut out block so that i would not be missing 2 corners that i now have to patch. she was a nice little old lady and the class only cost $5.00 so i went with it but it could have been cut better.

    yes filtering is important.
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  5. #5
    Super Member janRN's Avatar
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    When someone says "Always.." or "Never...". I think there are different ways of doing almost everything. I ignore the instructors that say "Always press to the dark fabric". I usually press my seams open (gasp!) or away from the quilting design I have planned.
    Imagine all the people living life in peace...(John Lennon 1940-1980)

  6. #6
    Super Member crafty pat's Avatar
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    I have seen a lot of people try to teach who are really not up to the task. I always try and logic things out for myself before I jump in to what someone else is telling me to do or how to think. Before taking advice or instructions always look to see if the work of the person giving it stands up to scrutiny.

  7. #7
    Super Member Helen S's Avatar
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    I've been sewing for about 50 years. I have always kept my iron's cord at the front of my ironing board, but I was told in the class I took earlier this year that I should ALWAYS keep it to the back so I don't trip on the cord. She said the ironed fabric should fall to the back of the ironing board and that way the cord won't wrinkle it again. Well, I haven't tripped over my iron's cord after 50 years, so it probably won't happen now, and she was doing everything just backwards from how I do it. I did as she asked in the class, but it ended there. In fact, my old iron's cord doesn't LIKE being twisted in the opposite direction it's used to being in.

    Yes, you can teach an old dog new tricks, but only if they want to learn them! Common sense tells me this is a hot iron and I should be cautious around it! (I hope I never have to eat those words, but will be sure to post if that happens.) LOL!
    Being skinny isn't easy, so I gave up and opted for being sexy instead. (aunty acid)

  8. #8
    Senior Member humbird's Avatar
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    I had an instructor tell me "It will all work out in the quilting" When I got home, I took my top apart and started over. That was the only class I ever took. No way was the quilting going to fix that mess!!!
    Last edited by humbird; 06-23-2012 at 04:14 PM. Reason: error

  9. #9
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    Well it sounds like we are a bunch of rebels doesn't it? Sorry you ended up with a new addition to your scrap bin. The good news is....it will look good as the main fabric in a scrap quilt.

  10. #10
    Super Member MacThayer's Avatar
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    You just have to do what works for you. I was a seamstress for many, many years, and old habits die hard. Because of this, I was accustomed to pressing all of my seams open. I have been nailed for this at every class I have taken since becoming a quilter. I don't like pressing to one side, I don't like nesting my seams, and I don't like stitching in the ditch all that much. I'm extremely careful to use 3 ply, strong cotton thread (Masterpiece 50# 3 ply) for my piecing, and carry the stitching to then end of each piece and lock it, so my seams don't come apart. I press the thread to "bury" it before I press it open. I like the way my tops lie flatter with open seams. More and more designers are pressing their seams open, like Bonnie Hunter. It works for me, I like it, stop harassing me, I'm sick of your lectures, and who made you the quilt police?

    I feel your pain.
    MacThayer

  11. #11
    Super Member hopetoquilt's Avatar
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    Sometimes it is our interpretation of the directions and sometimes it is the way it is stated. Did the instructor know that you "tear" your fabric or did she assume that you just cut? Would the directions have been okay if you cut?

    When I give directions/model something, I try to start with, "this is how I do it (and why); why not try it and see if it works for you." Classes are for learning and trying a new strategy/method and then self evaluating what works for you.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Marycumi's Avatar
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    I am always weary of a teacher that speaks in absolutes. Always do it this way, there is no other way, this is the best way, etc. There is more than one way to get the job done. I like to try new ways to get it done. But don't verbally slap my hand when I don't agree with what is said. I take classes to learn new techniques. I will try them and keep using them only if they make sense to me.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by hopetoquilt View Post
    Sometimes it is our interpretation of the directions and sometimes it is the way it is stated. Did the instructor know that you "tear" your fabric or did she assume that you just cut? Would the directions have been okay if you cut?

    When I give directions/model something, I try to start with, "this is how I do it (and why); why not try it and see if it works for you." Classes are for learning and trying a new strategy/method and then self evaluating what works for you.
    It was one of those 'learn and live' deals - I had understood to set aside the border fabric first - so that it wouldn't get inadvertently cut up for the center of the quilt -

    NOW I start from the center out and hope for the best when I get to the borders. That usually works for me.

    That was almost 20 years ago - I've learned a couple of things since then - and have a lot more confidence in my own judgment than I did way back then.

  14. #14
    Super Member suebee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacThayer View Post
    You just have to do what works for you. I was a seamstress for many, many years, and old habits die hard. Because of this, I was accustomed to pressing all of my seams open. I have been nailed for this at every class I have taken since becoming a quilter. I don't like pressing to one side, I don't like nesting my seams, and I don't like stitching in the ditch all that much. I'm extremely careful to use 3 ply, strong cotton thread (Masterpiece 50# 3 ply) for my piecing, and carry the stitching to then end of each piece and lock it, so my seams don't come apart. I press the thread to "bury" it before I press it open. I like the way my tops lie flatter with open seams. More and more designers are pressing their seams open, like Bonnie Hunter. It works for me, I like it, stop harassing me, I'm sick of your lectures, and who made you the quilt police?

    I feel your pain.
    AMEN Sista!
    SUEB

  15. #15
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    If I'm taking a workshop or class for a pattern the instructor designed and made herself then I'll do what she says. She knows the tips and hints for her pattern. If it is a general class with no technique involved then I do it the way it makes sense to me. I'm more of a make as desired type quilter.
    Got fabric?

  16. #16
    Senior Member Connie M.'s Avatar
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    The best advice I ever got about anything was "Advice is like being passed a plate of cookies. Look it over. Take what you want and let the rest pass by". Also free advice is worth what you pay for it.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Connie M. View Post
    The best advice I ever got about anything was "Advice is like being passed a plate of cookies. Look it over. Take what you want and let the rest pass by". Also free advice is worth what you pay for it.
    I like it, I like it!!!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by hopetoquilt View Post
    Sometimes it is our interpretation of the directions and sometimes it is the way it is stated. Did the instructor know that you "tear" your fabric or did she assume that you just cut? Would the directions have been okay if you cut?

    When I give directions/model something, I try to start with, "this is how I do it (and why); why not try it and see if it works for you." Classes are for learning and trying a new strategy/method and then self evaluating what works for you.
    BINGO....I was going to say...it is not always what it is said, but often what is heard that is the issue...how one interprets things varies as greatly as the leaves on a tree!

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaciqltznok View Post
    BINGO....I was going to say...it is not always what it is said, but often what is heard that is the issue...how one interprets things varies as greatly as the leaves on a tree!
    I agree wholeheartedly.
    Maggie in Jerusalem
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  20. #20
    Super Member AliKat's Avatar
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    What I remember most was taking a class to make a particular patterened shirt. I has stated that ready made patterns rarely fit me and knew I would need fitting help. I was assured that I would get the help and the shirt would fit.

    Well. It didn't. I had bought extra fabric to make matching shorts but ended up cutting into that fabric ... after the shirt didn't fit. Guess what? It still didn't fit!

    I do have some restrictions and need to do some things differently when sewing due to the arthritis. This affects my machine and quilting.

    Now I am particular about my needs and will challenge any LQS if I don't get what I ask for and will respectfully but determinedly ask for my money back.

    Somehow, now that I question more and am more explicit I have had no more problems. Yeah.

    ali
    Have fun quilting! If it isn't fun, you will miss a lot.
    ali

  21. #21
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    I took a class today with Klaudeen Hansen in Oelwein IA. I can happily report she was great about different ways of doing things. I took a Vintage machine (Singer 301) no problems there. She presented the project with pressing SUGGESTIONS of some seams open some to one side. But she had no problems with the fact that I'm of the press them open persuasion. She said it wasn't necessary to press every seam as you go, but didn't pressure me because I like to press as I go. She is teaching some classes at the AQS Des Moines quilt show. If it weren't corn picking time I'd take another of her classes. I barely get time to go to the show as I drive the combine a lot of the time.
    Cheryl Robinson
    http://www.silverneedlestitching.com
    APQS Millenium Longarm with Intelliquilter

  22. #22
    Senior Member quilticing's Avatar
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    Some "traditions" die hard. I think most of them are hanging around from the hand-piecing days. Seams are much stronger now, designs have changed. Do whatever gets a better product! (But please try to give your longarmer your best effort).

  23. #23
    Member tdvxh's Avatar
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    I had one quilt shop owner tell me don't worry about cutting the squares & half squares 5 5/8. She said use 6' thangles and it would all be fine. NOT. The squares did not fit with the 1/2 squares at all. I'ts now taking up space in my closet. Needless to say, all the squares have been cut as well as the half squares.

  24. #24
    Super Member ptquilts's Avatar
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    I used to do hand quilting for a lady who did books and a TV show about quilting - her seams were always pressed open. Her tops were the most precise I have ever seen.

    I too take a deep breath when I hear people say Always and Never. I think there are just some people who like to lay down rules.

  25. #25
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    So sorry that you were given advice that did not work for you. Advice is merely ideas or techniques that have worked for someone else, some advice is more universal than other advice. Yes, I am VERY opinionated BUT if I consider the source more knowledgeable than me, I am willing to try a their way. If it works for me then it was wonderful advice if it doesn't then I seek another method.

    I have been very fortunate to receive advice that was extremely useful. As a beginner quilter, I have a lot to learn. When I took my beginner class, we were all novices and many had never quilted anything before. Each of us produced a quilt that were amazing - most blocks had all their points and our quilts were square. Definite proof that we had received excellent advice and had been taught great techniques. Her advice was based on her mistakes and her personal experiences. We have all signed up for her next class!

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