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Thread: Bad Advice

  1. #26
    Senior Member lfletcher's Avatar
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    There are usually several ways to accomplish the same thing. When I take a class, I always do it the instructor's way, but I may not do it like that again. I have developed my own likes and dislikes, but I do like to learn new techniques so I usually give it a chance.

  2. #27
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    I was told at a Belle Point Quilt Guild meeting, by a man who was our speaker, and who had made 50 quilts in a year.....all from scraps he had or had been given him (he did not purchase any fabric for the quilts).....He told us, "There are no quilt police" and that we can do anything we wanted or could do while quilting!! That has been my mantra.....say it over and over, There are no quilt police.

  3. #28
    Super Member pumpkinpatchquilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lfletcher View Post
    There are usually several ways to accomplish the same thing. When I take a class, I always do it the instructor's way, but I may not do it like that again. I have developed my own likes and dislikes, but I do like to learn new techniques so I usually give it a chance.
    I am with you. I liked the "advice is like being passed a plate of cookies" saying also. There are many ways to do things, what matters more is what works for you and what gives you the outcome you desire. I have taught and have been taught. I just recently attended a Bonnie Hunter workshop and learned TONS, even though I've been sewing years...but there were still some things that Bonnie did that I like to do differently. I was respectful and did things as she suggested for the duration of the workshop but have gone back to my favorite technqiues at home.

    I would be forgiving in some ways too though - just because a teacher flubs up or does things differently doesn't mean that all they have to offer is without value. As said before - take what works for you and let the rest past by you.
    Valerie Smith - pumpkinpatchquilter
    Obsessed Quilter and APQS Long Arm Machine Quilter
    www.pumpkinpatchquilter.com

  4. #29
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    when I take a class I try the method that the teacher is teaching in class due to that being why I took the class was to learn. then if it works for me I use it if not I don't. I have learned some very usful tips from several teachers and when I am teaching a class I show students what works for me and then let the students do what works for them. I love taking classes and learning and I love teaching too.

  5. #30
    Senior Member ksdot417's Avatar
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    My thought is - if everyone did as they were told new techniques would never surface. I'm glad people try new things and think for themselves. If I've learned one thing in quilting it is that it's not a one size fits all.

  6. #31
    Super Member AnnT's Avatar
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    I've never taken a quilting class, just doing it on my own and reading. Sometimes I go with the instructions and sometimes in reading them, they just don't make sense to me. When that happens I usually try to take the time to do a trial with scraps to see if what I'm being told to do really works. Often it doesn't so I just do it the way it makes sense to me. We don't all think the same or sew the same so I'm all for doing it the way you do best! I think an instructor would just confuse me; my mom taught me to sew 45+years ago and she's has left-handed tendencies and I am right-handed all the way but I do some things left handed.
    Take time to recharge your batteries. Itís hard to see where youíre going when your lights are dim. Robert H. Connelly

  7. #32
    Super Member patchsamkim's Avatar
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    Everyone, including teachers have their own way of doing things. The teacher is sharing what she recommends, but there may be other, better ways of making a quilt than what the teacher shares. I like the cookie analogy too...makes sense. You can always learn something new.
    Especially for beginners a good teacher is so important....not good to get started out wrong.

  8. #33
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    When I taught a PP class, I told the ladies, "this is the way I do it, but I will also show you some other ways to do it. Pick what works for you." It all came out good.

  9. #34
    Super Member margecam52's Avatar
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    I was told to reserve also...nope...if there isn't enough border/binding fabric left...I'll use something else, lol.

    What I tell the folkls on the TinLizzieLongarm Yahoo Group is that there are as many ways to quilt as there are quilter's. There is no right or wrong way...just do what works for you.
    I know a lot of how I make quilts would make the quilt police faint...but I get my quilts done!
    Marge


    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray View Post
    When the instructor told us to reserve the border fabric before cutting the rest of the pieces. I botched about three yards of fabric by doing that - I tore off 'too much' and ruined the main design.

    Anyone else have 'instructor advice' that you have since learned to ignore?
    Marge Campbell
    TL18LS/Qbot V3 automated quilter
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  10. #35
    Super Member karate lady's Avatar
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    I just cannot afford to pay for classes, so most of my "learning" is just trying or reading a book. sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't. Every quilt I make is a learning experience for me and I tell the recipient of the quilt that. So far no one complains and the non quilters say they don't even see what mistakes I am talking about. I guess I put enough love into my quilts to make up for the "oops" part of it. Most of my books come from thrift stores...

  11. #36
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    I had an instructor who was very unprepared to deal with tips for my dealing with being left handed. She did not realize that everything can look backwards and that I had to do some things in a manner that seemed strange for her. Her advice was "just pretend that you are right handed and follow along with the instructions she gave. I never went back.
    Kaye Jacobson Salverda

  12. #37
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lori S View Post
    Yes , I have had someone tell me batiks don't run/bleed. I also had them tell me its best to use/cut cross grain , when clearly having stretch would pose a problem later. I have had them even tell me my almost vintage machine will never produce as good results as a newer machine.
    I have learned over the years to filter! and yes my 40 years of quilting can be my most valuable asset in assessing what should be filtered.
    How does cutting across the grain cause stretch? Or am I misunderstanding what you are saying? On the bias??
    Bad Spellers of the World
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  13. #38
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dakota Girl View Post
    I had an instructor who was very unprepared to deal with tips for my dealing with being left handed. She did not realize that everything can look backwards and that I had to do some things in a manner that seemed strange for her. Her advice was "just pretend that you are right handed and follow along with the instructions she gave. I never went back.

    I'd hate to think what my left handed sis would have told her!
    Bad Spellers of the World
    U N T I E

  14. #39
    Senior Member captlynhall's Avatar
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    I made my first quilt from watching tutorials on YouTube and checking books out of the library. My grandmother had taught me to quilt when I was young girl, but I had never pieced before and was a bit apprehensive about that. I mean,it had been close to 50 yrs. since I had quilted. My first effort came out respectable enough, but I decided to take a class at my LQS soon after. WOW!. I learned so much. The teacher was great and I had so much fun. I wish I had had the tips and techniques she taught me when I made my first quilt. Perhaps I would not have struggled so much. I look forward to taking more classes as time and money allow. Unfortunately, she has moved across country, but we'll see what the next teacher has to offer.
    Last edited by captlynhall; 06-24-2012 at 11:31 AM. Reason: grammar

  15. #40
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    A gal at the LQS told me that my color choices would not work for the pattern I had. Stupid me (newbee) allowed her to talk me into a "safe" color. I never finished that quilt because it was sooooo boring. Same LQS different person asked me if I was planning to use "all those" colors on the same quilt? Of course I was. She asked me if I planned to name the quilt "Nightmare on Elmstreet?" What a b****. This time I stuck to my guns and it turned out the way I imagined. That LQS went out of business. I wonder why!

  16. #41
    Senior Member bigdogmom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dakota Girl View Post
    I had an instructor who was very unprepared to deal with tips for my dealing with being left handed. She did not realize that everything can look backwards and that I had to do some things in a manner that seemed strange for her. Her advice was "just pretend that you are right handed and follow along with the instructions she gave. I never went back.
    Years ago I took a crochet class,and because Iwas left handed the instructor told me "just turn your book upside down!" I never went back,my mom taught me, but I only made one thing. Never had a problem with quilt classes. I did English smocking and that instructor was (yeah) left handed!
    Celia

  17. #42
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    rules were made to be broken. so just do what works for you. My first quilt I gave to a dear old friend turned out just how I wanted it and he loved it, that was before I knew there were any rules at all.

  18. #43
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrannieAnnie View Post
    How does cutting across the grain cause stretch? Or am I misunderstanding what you are saying? On the bias??
    Cross cut or fabric cut from selvedge to selvedge egde has more stretch then cutting paralel to the selvedge edge. It can be problematic when working with long lenghts of strips, such a borders of a single fabric, long skinny block units and many binding issues can come from cross cut fabric.
    I do many quilts that have multiple borders, and having a mix in particular .. a skinny narrow cross cut next to a lenghtwise grain border .. the cross cut will never seem to lay quite as flat as the lenghtwise cut. I do have to "mix " my cuts as sometimes it just not as effiecient use of fabric ... but every time there is a noticeable difference in the "mixed" edges . Starch does help in reducing the stretch while working on the project ...
    Bias edge or a diagonal cut at an angle across the weave will produce the most stretch.
    Batiks because of the tight weave do not stretch nearly as much as regular cottons on the cross cut. Test yourself .. take a piece of fabric and try to stretch pulling on the parallel to the fabric then same fabric pull across .

  19. #44
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    Thanks for all the good advise ladies and gentlemen i love this board

  20. #45
    Senior Member Quiltlady330's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helen S View Post
    I've been sewing for about 50 years. I have always kept my iron's cord at the front of my ironing board, but I was told in the class I took earlier this year that I should ALWAYS keep it to the back so I don't trip on the cord. She said the ironed fabric should fall to the back of the ironing board and that way the cord won't wrinkle it again. Well, I haven't tripped over my iron's cord after 50 years, so it probably won't happen now, and she was doing everything just backwards from how I do it. I did as she asked in the class, but it ended there. In fact, my old iron's cord doesn't LIKE being twisted in the opposite direction it's used to being in.

    Yes, you can teach an old dog new tricks, but only if they want to learn them! Common sense tells me this is a hot iron and I should be cautious around it! (I hope I never have to eat those words, but will be sure to post if that happens.) LOL!
    I really admire the way you handled that. Sometimes we make a really big issue over things that only intimidate others or challenge their position. You were very gracious...but discerning.

  21. #46
    Super Member katesnanna's Avatar
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    Once had a "teacher" who could not admit that her way wasn't the only way. If I can't do it how someone has shown me I usually think there has to be a better way for me. Doesn't make anyone right or wrong just different. We didn't consider her a good teacher because she didn't want to share information, but if anyone came to class with a hint she would be very sarcastic. We always had to go find her if we need help because she spent more time out in the shop than in the class room.
    Some of us started our own group.
    The shop owner kept saying they had a long list of people waiting to get into the classes. Well if this was so why did she go out of business less than 12 months later. She even tried to convince me that rayon was a natural fiber.

  22. #47
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    Actually, rayon is sort of a half-breed - it is neither a truly 'natural' fiber nor truly a 'synthetic' fiber.
    It is a manufactured regenerated cellulose fiber.

    So that person was partially correct about the rayon.

  23. #48
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    I too press my seams open. I feel everything lays flatter. We say ther are no quilt police but how is an opened pressed seam looked at my judges in a show?

  24. #49
    Senior Member 4dogs's Avatar
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    I had one tell us to be sure to pull the backing down as tight as possible and tape it down, before pinning the top to it.........well, you can guess what that tight backing did, once it was untaped and I tried to quilt it..............no way to make the top fit to the bottom, evenly............

  25. #50
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    I too press my seams open. I feel everything lays flatter. We say ther are no quilt police but how is an opened pressed seam looked at by judges in a show? I also use poly blend threads now because I quilted a quilt on the diaganol and the all cotton thread I used breaks if it has the tiniest bit of pull on it. I also try my best to cut all border fabric length wise so I don't have to deal with the stretching from crosswise cut pieces.
    Robin in TX
    Last edited by rob529; 06-25-2012 at 03:09 AM.

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