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Thread: Best and easiest way o transfer a motif onto my quilt? A beginner!!!

  1. #1
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    Best and easiest way o transfer a motif onto my quilt? A beginner!!!

    I am a beginner wanting to learn how to do free form quilting. I learned the hard way by attempting to free motion quilt on a simple quilt I had made. Result- a lot of stitch ripping!!!

    I am ready to start again , but I am wondering what the easiest way to transfer a simple motif onto my quilt to guide me.(using transfer paper, making a stencil and repeating it every inch? )What do you suggest is the best way to transfer the design onto the fabric?? (Using a chalk pencil, washable markers, marking pencils?)

    Thanks for any insight as to what you might suggest!
    Linda
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 04-05-2019 at 04:46 PM. Reason: shouting/all caps

  2. #2
    Super Member meyert's Avatar
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    I am going to be watching this because I wish I had a good way to do this as well. I hate that chalk wipes offs... I use stencils with crayola fine tip washable markers, but get so tired of marking the pounce is quick but wipes off and I had an experience where the blue pounce didn't wash completely out

    I think my next attempt will be with crayola washable marks and stencils, but just mark smaller areas (instead of trying to mark the entire top at once) Hopefully I will have a little better time with that

  3. #3
    Super Member NZquilter's Avatar
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    Welcome to quilting! I use Crayola Ultra Washable markers, from Wal-Mart, and stencils. It does mean I have to mark pretty much the whole quilt, which can be a pain of work, but at least I know everything is the same size and uniform. For an organic style quilting I don't mark on the quilt, just practice like billi-o on a whiteboard, until my muscle memory is good enough.
    We didn't realize we were making memories, we just knew we were having fun. ~ Winnie the Pooh ~

    1912 World's Rotary Treadle (White Company), 1942 Singer 66-16, 1952 Pfaff 130-6, 1954 Singer 15-91, 1956 Singer 201-2

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    Super Member Teen's Avatar
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    I sometimes use all the above mentioned techniques but the easiest for me when wuilting a continuous motif was using quilting paper. It's super thin and tears away easily. You trace pattern on paper and pin paper to the area of quilt...then sew over paper. You can buy this paper by the roll. It's called Golden Threads quilting paper and can be purchased mostly anywhere but I found it on Amazon.. Check out the youtubes on this technique....

    Edit to add: welcome to the board!!
    Last edited by Teen; 04-05-2019 at 05:31 PM.
    Quilting therapy for the therapist...
    My Summertime Swap blocks: https://www.quiltingboard.com/member...bums19923.html

  5. #5
    Super Member Teen's Avatar
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    Here's a YouTube link for one of my favorite teachers...

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=NyjDXLNFSV0
    Quilting therapy for the therapist...
    My Summertime Swap blocks: https://www.quiltingboard.com/member...bums19923.html

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    Great tutorial. Thanks for sharing!!

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    Marking quilts

    Quote Originally Posted by suspendedglass View Post
    I am a beginner wanting to learn how to do free form quilting. I learned the hard way by attempting to free motion quilt on a simple quilt I had made. Result- a lot of stitch ripping!!!

    I am ready to start again , but I am wondering what the easiest way to transfer a simple motif onto my quilt to guide me.(using transfer paper, making a stencil and repeating it every inch? )What do you suggest is the best way to transfer the design onto the fabric?? (Using a chalk pencil, washable markers, marking pencils?)

    Thanks for any insight as to what you might suggest!
    Linda
    I use Gold quilting paper and trace the pattern onto it. Then I take a 100 needle, no thread and stitch the design. If it's fabric that caulk marking wouldn't show up, I lightly spray the area where I will be placing the gold paper stencil. But, my favored way is to take the stencil I just made with gold quilting paper and use a chalk pouncer to mark the quilt. You don't have to remove the paper this way. a lot faster.

  8. #8
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    I watched the video and decided at the very end where she was removing all the tiny bits of paper that had to be removed....my eyes are getting old....I think this is not the way to go. I will stick with my Crayola ultra washable markers and mark my quilts. She said this is so much easier than marking the quilt......not when you waste more time that marking, by having to remove all the tiny pieces of paper.

  9. #9
    Super Member NZquilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lady Diana View Post
    ... I will stick with my Crayola ultra washable markers and mark my quilts. She said this is so much easier than marking the quilt......not when you waste more time that marking, by having to remove all the tiny pieces of paper.
    I think so too. With the Golden Threads paper you have to spend time marking the paper and spend time removing all the paper... With the Crayola markers, you just spend time marking the quilt! Maybe I'm lazy, but heavens, if I can save time, I will!
    We didn't realize we were making memories, we just knew we were having fun. ~ Winnie the Pooh ~

    1912 World's Rotary Treadle (White Company), 1942 Singer 66-16, 1952 Pfaff 130-6, 1954 Singer 15-91, 1956 Singer 201-2

  10. #10
    Super Member EmiliasNana's Avatar
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    I have used the blue or purple disappearing pens and they aren't dark enough for me. I have used the pounce pad on small projects and only like the iron off version as the others seem to "bounce off" with the action of the presser foot.
    I can FMQ fairly well but usually prefer doing small motifs or following a line (on a panel or outlining an applique in the ditch). My newest quilt I decided to buy a heart and flowers pantograph from Urban Elementz and traced using my large light box and Crayola Ultra-Clean washable markers, prior to sandwiching. Since the top was light in color, it worked marvelously. It took me two evenings, but the quilting was a breeze. No paper to tear off and the design can be used over and over. Here is a sample of the quilting.
    Name:  Cameron_quilting.jpg
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    Last edited by EmiliasNana; 04-06-2019 at 06:31 AM. Reason: added picture

  11. #11
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    I have vision issues and I often use paper to help me. Plus, I work mostly in scrap quilts and there is no single color marker that I will be able to see on all the squares.

    When I first started doing this decades ago, I used tissue paper which I don't recommend. For one, some of it has a light plastic side that doesn't tear so well when you want to, but you do have to be very careful with it the entire time. When I was using my friend's long arm I started using rolls of Parchment Paper I get at the dollar store (1' x 25' rolls!), that one foot size worked very well with her machine.

    So the downsides, yes, you have to draw the design and using pencil you get a lot of graphite on your hands. I would not use pencil on a white on white project. Yes, you have to tear off the paper which does take time, but it's a lot less time than it would take me to mark the top even including the time I used to draw the design. I often buy panto designs, my friend's set up doesn't do pantos but it makes great originals for me to trace.

    Here's a really great help when you have lots of repeating square designs, while you can also use it for long rows or borders I mostly use it for block designs. This is one of those easier to show than describe things! First, draw out your master design, say you need 42 blocks worth, cut your block papers and make 7 6-thick stacks. I personally then copy the master onto 7 pieces with one on each stack and then I take little bits of blue painters tape (a roll of which is in my sewing kit) to hold the stack together and then go to your sewing machine. With no thread and a needle that you will throw away afters, stitch through the master design and all of the stack. You will be able to follow the punched holes for your pattern and the prestitching makes it easier to tear off. You'll notice my daisy isn't very precise but that's the beauty of tearing off the paper, nobody ever knows how closely you followed your design.

    I have some pictures I took for a friend...
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Here's what the completed daisy top looks like, I bought it for $1.99 at the thrift store, the main fabric is a Suzy's Zoo duck print with rain and umbrellas and I used a daisy border print fabric for the back that I had in my stash. It had been layered together and safety pinned with a double layer of batting (too thick!) and a flannel back of trucks that had no relation to the top. I gave the flannel to the lady in my group who makes premie quilts (they use flannel on the back), I've used one layer of the batting in a donation quilt, have enough left for another. Not a bad deal! The border print photo doesn't show the top edge, but the border print is equal on both ends of the quilt.

    And then I've included my first Quilt Board photo of me, unfortunately a rather unattractive shot of me my hubby took while I was taking off paper from my Dog House quilt, it had a largish all over dog bone design. And that's Buddy, aka the naughty dog helping me.
    Attached Images Attached Images


    Last edited by Iceblossom; 04-06-2019 at 06:58 AM.

  13. #13
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    Welcome to the board and to the wonderful world of quilting. There are so many ways to mark a quilt and almost as many tools to do so. Best way and easiest way don't necessarily go hand in hand and what works great for one quilt may not work so great on another. As pointed out in some of the previous posts.

    There are also many variables to take into consideration. Hand quilting in a lap hoop and quilting on a domestic machine have challenges that quilting on a rack set up does not. For one thing, many chalk like tools can rub out because of all the manipulations you have to do on the quilt to fit it through the throat. The ultimate pounce is a great option for DSM quilting and transferring designs via stencil. The marks won't rub out. They only come out when you apply heat or wash the quilt. Also I have had the marks made with chalk pencils, the ceramic lead mechanical pencils rub out just from handling the quilt during the quilting process. So in your case I would only recommend any chalk based tools to mark as you go unless it is the Ultimate Pounce. Speaking of chalk, Always make sure the chalk you are using is wax free and oil free. I really avoid any colored chalks. Too many horror stories about the colored chalk not coming out and I have had it happen as well. So I only turn to chalk when I am marking dark colors. Also what washes out of one fabric may not wash out on another. Different dyes, manufacturing techniques and if you don't prewash, factory sizing can all impact how or if your marks will wash out, both markers and chalk based (assuming you are using a color, I have never had an issue with white chalks).

    I am a huge fan of the water soluble blue markers like dritz mark b gone. Problem with these is the pens don't last very long. You can easily go through 3 markers quilting one queen size quilt. I usually take 3 out and alternate them as I go. They kind of recharge and seem to last longer but they still don't last long and they are expensive too. But they are a product specifically made for marking fabric and so far they have always come out for me as long as I follow instructions, don't expose the marks to heat, try not to have them on the quilt for long periods of time (like months).

    The Crayola brand ultra washable markers are a fabulous tool as well as economical. I have had extremely good luck with them but like any marking tool you must test to make sure the will come out. I have heard of people having trouble with some of the colors like orange. And while I don't recommend it, I have actually ironed over Crayola washable marker marks and they still washed out.

    I do like transfer paper, like saral brand in both white and graphite. The white is a good option if you are working with dark fabric and really can't see to trace even with a light table. Here is a link where I describe in detail how I marked a quilt using transfer paper. https://www.quiltingboard.com/tutorials-f10/marking-original-design-dark-colored-top-longarm-quilting-t275470.html

    Golden threads I tend to only use for doing outlines then tear away and go back and do the fill details with no marking. A word of caution, I have had pencil graphite transfer to my thread and not come out. So I now only mark a golden threads paper with either a crayola washable marker or blue water soluble marker. Here is an example of some quilting I did with the golden threads paper, the Koi fish and the Gecko in the linked photos and if you scroll to post #67 another example: https://www.quiltingboard.com/pictures-f5/batik-block-swap-quilt-t221823.html

    Simple motifs that you are only outlining you can cut the shape out of freezer paper and iron it on your quilt then quilt around the freezer paper and it peels off. But I can tell you if you have a top covered with freezer paper ironed on, it will peel off in the process of scrunching up the quilt so I would also only use this method as I go.

    I have only touched on a few ways and tools there are so many. And as I stated previously not all techniques/tools work universally on all quilts. You need to experiment with many to see what works best for you and the particular quilt you are working on.

    I mark a lot. On any one quilt I have used numerous marking techniques and tools. Stencils and pounce pad, water soluble, golden threads, etc. I have had numerous quilts where I spent more time designing and marking then it took to do the actual quilting. Marking, in my mind is a tedious and time consuming task. We all want to get to the fun part which for me is the actual quilting. Marking is probably my least favorite part of the quilt making process, but the results are well worth the effort (for me) so I do it.


  14. #14
    Senior Member Sailorwoman's Avatar
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    Just a word of caution for those using washable markers. I used them to trace a motif onto a quilt since I have never had any trouble washing the marker out of the fabric. However, the thread picked up the colour from the marker and it was a real pain to get out. If possible, do not stitch directly on the marking line, but close to it.

  15. #15
    Super Member quiltedsunshine's Avatar
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    I like a white charcoal (not chalk) pencil for marking on dark colored fabrics. It sharpens better than chalk and stays on nicely, plus it comes off with a rub from an eraser or Seam Fix seam ripper rubber nubby. I also like the pink Frixion pen for light colored fabrics, and will use a black Frixion pen when the other two won't show.
    Annette in Utah

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    Definitely agree that Crayola Ultra Washable Markers are awesome and I've never had a problem with any of the colors washing out including the red and black. I've used all the colors, and recently since my oldest has started school and I always have to help her make a "project shirt" for whatever themed day at school, I got the great idea to use the markers on her shirts and every single mark has washed out.

    I've ironed on them, I've let them sit for months (a year or more??), washed in cold and warm water, and they've always washed out for me. Love them.

    I also have used the blue pounce powder and did also have an issue one time with it washing out, but not the other times. Odd.

    So, I use them differently too. When I use the pounce, I'm generally trying to mark a stencil that has a full design and not just a single image (like a flower or butterfly). I also spray the pounce with aerosol hairspray after I've marked it to "set" it. If you're using a hopping FMQ foot, that can cause the powder to bounce off but if you're using a gliding FMQ foot, I suspect it'd be fine. Mine is a hopping foot so the hairspray helps with that.

    You can, of course, mark with the crayolas the full stencil design but the pounce is faster. Then you wouldn't have the problem of trying to keep the marks on, the rubbing of the quilt doesn't rub the marks off, and they'll always wash out. The trade is the time.

    When I have a single design item, I combine it with another filler like loops or meandering to move from one image to another, and then you only have to mark the single design. In this case, I only marked the flower and just did loops to travel to the next marked flower. It was pretty fast!
    Name:  Lisa's Quilt Quilting.jpg
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    I've learned from paper piecing that I hate tearing out paper. Golden Threads paper is expensive and it's additional steps plus time investment. I'm pretty lazy I'm sure all you wonderful people are much more industrious than I am!

  17. #17
    Super Member Taughtby Grandma's Avatar
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    I use stencils and a frixion pen that comes out with heat. I just pop the quilt in the dryer when I'm done. I mark the blocks as I make them so the whole quilt is marked when it's put together.
    Jeanie

  18. #18
    Senior Member Cheri_J's Avatar
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    Loved the video. Like some, when it came to ripping out the little pieces, I thought it looked like a lot of work. I have been stitching in the ditch forever and really want to branch out with FMQ. The paper method might be my "feather" (Dumbo reference) to get the confidence to do this.

    I tend to use a lot of colors when I quilt and I'm not sure the washable Crayola markers would stand out enough. Since I've never used them, I don't really know.

    I really appreciate this thread. It's given me a lot of new ideas.

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