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Thread: Best way to make a crazy scrappy?

  1. #1
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    Best way to make a crazy scrappy?

    So I've made scrappy before, it's one of my all time favorites but never "crazy" always 6" blocks or D9P or breadcrumb. I have tons of scraps from making quilts for special little ones in my life and this particular fabric was very expensive so I want to use every scrap I can to make a quilt for my son. I've got little triangles that are 2", up to larger nearly fat quarters size but oddly shaped, even some strings. Is the best way to go about it to do the "sew to a sheet" method or just start stitching together randomly? Out of my element here and a bit excited but nervous lol. .

  2. #2
    Super Member KalamaQuilts's Avatar
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    maybe you'd like crumb quilting? Fabric good to the last stith?
    http://quiltville.com/crumbspf.html

    some crumb quilt images
    https://www.google.com/search?q=crum...w=1366&bih=638

    because of all the fabric that will go into a block, I'd use phone book paper, or tissue, something I could take off once the block was made and trimmed to size. To reduce weight.

  3. #3
    Super Member quiltsRfun's Avatar
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    Here are some of my random scrappy blocks. I just start sewing pieces together. Then press and trim so all sides are straight. Sew some more, press and trim until they're a bit bigger than the size block I want. Then trim to size. My blocks are 8-1/2 inches because I have a ruler that size which makes for easy squaring up. One thing I've learned with this technique - starch is your best friend. With all those random seams going every which way it really helps.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #4
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    Thanks to both of you! I was thinking I had to get an old bedsheet and start stitching onto it, for some silly reason it didn't occur to me that I could make blocks and use all my little pieces in them . That makes less bulk to shift around while piecing.

  5. #5
    Power Poster lynnie's Avatar
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    i did a crumb quilt 4" blocks. most had about 5-7 pieces. one had 16. i used every bit of a favorite fabric.
    put off till tomorrow what you can do today, and if you procrastinate long enough, you may never have to do it.

  6. #6
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    That's great lynnie, I love the idea of wasting almost nothing

  7. #7
    Power Poster sewbizgirl's Avatar
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    You could make crumb blocks and alternate them with the same size blocks cut from some of the FQs.
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/sewbizgirl
    Boom 20 Album of Blocks I made to swap https://www.quiltingboard.com/member...bums19942.html
    "The reward of a thing well done is having done it." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

  8. #8
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    I make crumb blocks on wash away stabilizer, then soak in water to remove. Crumb blocks are so busy with all those little pieces, that I alternate these blocks with some simple blocks like a snowball block of muslin, or just plain muslin.

  9. #9
    Super Member Sandygirl's Avatar
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    Creative Grids rulers have 2 "scrap crazy" rulers.
    sandy
    Sandygirl

    Janome 9900 / Janome 9700 / Janome 3160 QVC/ Janome 1100D serger, Juki 2020 Mini
    Singer Centennial model (inherited from my late, fav aunt!)

  10. #10
    Super Member rryder's Avatar
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    I make crumb blocks by just sewing together bits an straightening edges as needed in order to add more crumbs. Then I trim them to whatever size I need or whatever size gives me the most interesting block. I tend to put them into modern settings using solid fabrics for fill strips and that way I don't have to make my crumb blocks all the same size.

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  11. #11
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
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    I use foundation big square papers from Missouri Star, makes my life easier. I do the flip and sew method for each square. Some Iron Scrap quilters sew small pieces of scraps together to make a long strip and then cut the strip the length and width they want to cover the paper.
    I believe giving what I can will never cause me to be in need.
    Being cheap is not a badge of honor.
    My heroes are working people, paying their own way, taking care of their children and being decent human beings.

  12. #12
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    As you suggested, a true old fashioned crazy quilt was done as one continuous piece of "made" fabric. Working on an old sheet would give you a stabilizer to help make sure that you keep it nice and flat as you stitch the pieces on.


    Another way that I have done crazy is by doing a "mile a minute" ....
    http://patchworkpie.blogspot.ca/2008...ute-quilt.html

    It's a project that you create over time as you create scraps.
    I find it works best to wait til you have a bunch, so you get a good variety of different fabrics.
    Then have a sew-fest and put them all together.
    Then build up more trimmings and go back at it.

    If you don't want defined blocks (with or without sashing), the larger blocks you make the more likely the blocks will just assimilate together to be one.
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    I have a couple phone books like Bonnie Hunter uses but I also have tissue paper you can buy in packages of 20 or more that are 20"x 20" (some 20x30). I kpaid maybe $2 for the package at the discount dollar store. the cheapest copy printer paper can often be purchased for $5.99 and usually has at least 500 sheets in each package. You can start with any shape you want. I love when there's no rhyme or reason. It's your quilt to do with as you want. Start with a small scrap or a large and any direction from anywhere on your foundation. You also don't need a foundation for a crazy quilt!

  14. #14
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
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    The fastest way I have made a scrap crazy quilt was to fuse all the fabric pieces over lapping on washable fusible stabilizer. Did a close quilting on it. The edges of the fabric frayed making the quilt soft. It is one of my DD's favorite quilts.
    I believe giving what I can will never cause me to be in need.
    Being cheap is not a badge of honor.
    My heroes are working people, paying their own way, taking care of their children and being decent human beings.

  15. #15
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    Just keep in mind that scrappy quilts can be very difficult because they are rarely random! Often we take more time with the planning, the rearranging and tweaking them than we do with a regular blocked quilt.

  16. #16
    Super Member madamekelly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltE View Post
    As you suggested, a true old fashioned crazy quilt was done as one continuous piece of "made" fabric. Working on an old sheet would give you a stabilizer to help make sure that you keep it nice and flat as you stitch the pieces on.
    Oh my goodness, you have just explained why the old velveteen and satin embroidered crazy quilt I remember from childhood did not look like the modern ones! It was not done in squares either. Now I have to go look up how to make the originals....
    If you always do, what you have always done, The results never change. Change is the wings you give yourself.

  17. #17
    Super Member Irishrose2's Avatar
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    I bought two quilt tops made like that from an estate sale. I was going to finish them for prayer quilts, but the tension was so far off on 'Grandma's' machine that, IMO, they weren't usable and much too time consuming to try to save them.
    I made a crazy quilt wall hanging on thin muslin and the muslin didn't add much weight.

  18. #18
    Super Member Teddybear Lady's Avatar
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    Name:  closeup of 4 blocks.jpg
Views: 183
Size:  1.72 MB

    I just sew scraps together then square up with my 8 inch template/ruler. I put black sashing between these blocks and it is now quilted and on my bed. I think scrappy quilts are my favorite.

  19. #19
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by madamekelly View Post
    Oh my goodness, you have just explained why the old velveteen and satin embroidered crazy quilt I remember from childhood did not look like the modern ones! It was not done in squares either. Now I have to go look up how to make the originals....
    Yes definitely, they didn't do squares!
    You certainly could make a more traditional crazy quilt today ..... just stitch pieces on as you go.
    I would start somewhat in the middle and work my way out.
    At times you will add a piece be covering up a piece from before.
    You may want to trim it off on the underside and re-use, or just go with the layering.

    And don't forget all of the beautiful hand stitchery that was on top of those crazy quilts after the fact!
    I think a lot of the time, that covered up imperfections and raw edges that weren't stitched down.
    But I am sure someone here will be sure to correct me on the old crazy quilt processes!

    Madame Kelly, I think you should make one!
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  20. #20
    Super Member Daylesewblessed's Avatar
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    I use a focus fabric cut about 5 or 6 inches square, but in an irregular angular shape with at least 5 sides. Then I do the sew and flip around the focus and to the edges of a square piece of old sheeting that is 10" square. Trim to 9.5". This is particularly fun with children's focus fabrics and coordinating colors of scraps.

  21. #21
    Junior Member shadoh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Onebyone View Post
    The fastest way I have made a scrap crazy quilt was to fuse all the fabric pieces over lapping on washable fusible stabilizer. Did a close quilting on it. The edges of the fabric frayed making the quilt soft. It is one of my DD's favorite quilts.
    That sounds lovely, the soft fraying. What size blocks did you make? Then just join them the regular way? A photo would be nice.

  22. #22
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    I made a Crumb Quilt a few years ago. It was so much fun! I just grabbed an arm full of my smaller scraps and just stitched pieces together till I felt it was big enough to square it into a block. My blocks ended at about 6 and 1/2 inches square. To date it is one of my favorite quilts I've made. Name:  Crumb Qlt I made.jpg
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  23. #23
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    That's really pretty! I love the polka dot sashing! Thanks again everyone, all the ideas are great, I wish I had even more scraps cause now I want to use two or three different methods to make crazy scrappy

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