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Thread: Beware of Spray Baste

  1. #1
    Power Poster sewbizgirl's Avatar
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    Beware of Spray Baste

    My SD longarm has been acting up lately, and yesterday it started shredding thread as I sewed. I was dumbfounded as to why, so took apart the face plate and got into the top of the bobbin area. Yuck! The parts were all coated with so much sticky mess, and of course the lint all adhered to it. I cleaned it out as best as I could, but need to get back in there and use something to melt off that sticky crud without damaging my machine. I'm done using spray baste for that machine!

    What can I use to clean the gunk off safely? Alcohol? Followed by lots of oil?
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  2. #2
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    ​I think I might use my long tweezer with a piece of white cotton fabric square. I would put a bit of machine oil on the square and rub the sticky to see if that works.

  3. #3
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sewbizgirl View Post
    My SD longarm ............I'm done using spray baste for that machine!
    I'm confused ... I thought there was no need for spray baste with a longarm.
    Maybe you can enlighten me? Thanks!


    As for removing the gunk .... I use alcohol swabs on my DSM and it dissolves the spray residue.

    However, for your longarm, you might be better to check with your dealer/manufacturer.
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  4. #4
    Super Member maryb119's Avatar
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    I don't spray baste when I load a quilt on the long arm. There is no need for it.

  5. #5
    Super Member NZquilter's Avatar
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    SD longarm is a sitdown longarm.

    Sorry about your problem! I never use spray basting, but I've always been considered about the stickiness.
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  6. #6
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    On a Sit Down Longarm, you still have to baste as there is no frame.

    Sewbiz, so sorry you are dealing with this!

  7. #7
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sephie View Post
    On a Sit Down Longarm, you still have to baste as there is no frame.
    Quote Originally Posted by NZquilter View Post
    SD longarm is a sitdown longarm.
    My apologies for inquiring Ladies ... I was thinking SD was initials for a brand name.
    I totally missed that was for Sit Down!

    Yes of course ... some form of sandwich basting needs to be done for the sit down.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltE View Post
    My apologies for inquiring Ladies
    No need for apologies, QuiltE! I can see how it was a little confusing

    I knew you could rub your needle with rubbing alcohol to de-gunk it but I guess I never thought about using it on the inside of the machine as well. Silly me.

  9. #9
    Power Poster feline fanatic's Avatar
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    I have worse news for you. On some brands of LA that stuff can travel up your needle bar and gunk things up in there as well. If you don't have access to take it all apart and clean it out you may have to bring it in for a servicing. Last year I was having issues with mine, (not a sit down machine) and tech support thought glue from fusible applique had mucked things up in the needle bar, apparently it has happened to a lot of users. That wasn't my issue but in the troubleshooting process, the manufacturer (tech support) had me buy a gun cleaning kit for a .22. I had to remove the needle bar and ream out the area using the gun cleaning tool/reamer completely saturated with oil (sorry I can't remember if he just had me use my machine oil or the special oil in the gun cleaning kit) used to clean out a barrel of a gun. So you may be able to clean out your bobbin area using machine oil or the oil for cleaning guns. You can probably pick it up at any sporting goods place or if you have hunters in your family they would surely have it (or should anyways). Most LA manufacturers have phone support. I would call.
    Last edited by feline fanatic; 05-09-2019 at 11:31 AM.

  10. #10
    Super Member rryder's Avatar
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    I would use a little alcohol on a cotton swab followed by a good oiling when youíve got the gunk gone.

    I use 505 and had the same problem the first couple of times I used it. Here are A couple of things that solved the sticky gunk problem, for me:

    1. using a very light hand with the spray baste- I still pin my spray basted pieces in a few places- I donít use enough spray baste to completely take the place of pinning- But it allows me to get away with using fewer pins- maybe every 12 inches Iíll put in a pin instead of every 3 or 4.

    2. Let your quilt sit for at least 24 hours after spray basting to give the adhesive time to set up- thatís what completely solved the problem for me.

    Rob
    Last edited by rryder; 05-09-2019 at 11:42 AM.
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  11. #11
    Super Member cashs_mom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rryder View Post
    I would use a little alcohol on a cotton swab followed by a good oiling when you’ve got the gunk gone.

    I use 505 and had the same problem the first couple of times I used it. Here are A couple of things that solved the sticky gunk problem, for me:

    1. using a very light hand with the spray baste- I still pin my spray basted pieces in a few places- I don’t use enough spray baste to completely take the place of pinning- But it allows me to get away with using fewer pins- maybe every 12 inches I’ll put in a pin instead of every 3 or 4.

    2. Let your quilt sit for at least 24 hours after spray basting to give the adhesive time to set up- that’s what completely solved the problem for me.

    Rob
    Thanks for that, Rob. Those things would probably be good to keep in mind no matter what type of machine you are quilting on.
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  12. #12
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    Yes, definitely use a light hand with the spray baste. And I have no problem waiting 24 hours to quilt. Usually it is more than 24 days!

  13. #13
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by feline fanatic View Post
    I have worse news for you. On some brands of LA that stuff can travel up your needle bar and gunk things up in there as well. If you don't have access to take it all apart and clean it out you may have to bring it in for a servicing. Last year I was having issues with mine, (not a sit down machine) and tech support thought glue from fusible applique had mucked things up in the needle bar, apparently it has happened to a lot of users. That wasn't my issue but in the troubleshooting process, the manufacturer (tech support) had me buy a gun cleaning kit for a .22. I had to remove the needle bar and ream out the area using the gun cleaning tool/reamer completely saturated with oil (sorry I can't remember if he just had me use my machine oil or the special oil in the gun cleaning kit) used to clean out a barrel of a gun. So you may be able to clean out your bobbin area using machine oil or the oil for cleaning guns. You can probably pick it up at any sporting goods place or if you have hunters in your family they would surely have it (or should anyways). Most LA manufacturers have phone support. I would call.

    Feline, the tech (actually Michael) thought I had the same issue, so I bought the gun kit, did the cleaning. But I had never used any of the spray products, or applique glue. I was quilting on batiks and was told that batiks or white-on-white (WOW) fabric can cause the needle bar to get gummed up. Actually it turned out that I had a different problem. I loosened a belt in the back of the machine, and then everything ran fine.

  14. #14
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I don't have a long arm nor sit down quilting machine and I never sew anything with any sort of adhesive.
    I only baste with large safety pins. For applique I use washable Elmer's school glue dried with my iron. Not much applique either.
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  15. #15
    Power Poster sewbizgirl's Avatar
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    Thanks for the responses and ideas. Sorry I didn't spell out Sit Down! My error. You also need to sandwich if you have a little foot frame for your longarm.

    I do like Rob and spray very minimally and also pin with safety pins. And I always let the quilts dry. Maybe it's because I run so many of them through that machine....

    Feline, the scenario you painted sounds like one huge PITA. The last spray glue quilt is done and I will never use it again.

    I will clean as well as I can, but I can't get in where I need to really well. I think the machine will have to be professionally broken down and de-gunked. Bummer.
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  16. #16
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
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    There is product called UnDo. It is non toxic and won't harm photographs stuck to glass frames as it removes them. It's now sold in a small bottle for the public instead of by the drum or gallon. Walmart has it but it's hard to find, could be any dept. It removes stickers, bumper stickers, gum, adhesives, anything stuck. It evaporates and leaves no residue. I keep a bottles in the kitchen, my sewing room, and in the laundry room. Don't buy the one labeled can be sold in CA. I tossed that one, it just wasn't as good. https://www.un-du.com/Products.html
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  17. #17
    Power Poster sewbizgirl's Avatar
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    Thanks, 1x1! That sounds like just the stuff. Hope I can find it locally. If not, thanks for the link to order.
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  18. #18
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    You could still spray baste, just don't do it near the machine.

  19. #19
    Power Poster sewbizgirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sewvicki View Post
    You could still spray baste, just don't do it near the machine.

    Good one, Vicki!
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  20. #20
    Super Member SusieQOH's Avatar
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    SBG, sorry about your troubles. Hope it's an easy fix!!
    I had to scroll down because I didn't know what a SD was Now I do!

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    You might want to consider nail polish remover or acetone. The remove the tape residue on the skin after surgery, we use acetone. I am guessing that if it is safe for the skin, it probably will be ok for the metal?
    Thanks for asking. Karen

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    I am sorry you are dealing with this and I appreciate your bringing this to the attention of the rest of us. Basting spray is convenient, but not if it is going to cause damage.
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    Quote Originally Posted by dunster View Post
    I was quilting on batiks and was told that batiks or white-on-white (WOW) fabric can cause the needle bar to get gummed up.
    I am using white on offwhite in a quilt I'm making now so I'm glad to see this. It's obviously some kind of paint, but I guess I thought that they'd be sure that whatever they used was safe for sewing machines. Not cool that it isn't.

  24. #24
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
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    The white on white is common fabric has a coating used for the pattern on a white background. Look at the white on white really close up. You can feel and tell the vinyl like coating. It will cause problems when sewing through for many especially long armers. If the pattern motif is woven as part of the fabric then you hit pay dirt, buy the whole bolt.
    Last edited by Onebyone; 05-11-2019 at 06:26 AM.
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  25. #25
    Super Member tuckyquilter's Avatar
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    what I said was never, ever use Sullivans Spray Baste. I tried to save money and it was the biggest mess I've ever encountered. Ended up having to wash the quilt in order to get the stitching out before I could finish quilting. My LA gal uses spray basting along the edges of quilts.
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 05-11-2019 at 01:49 PM. Reason: remove comments on moderation
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