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Thread: Binding, Bias or Straight-cut?

  1. #1
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    Binding, Bias or Straight-cut?

    When do you cut binding on the bias?

  2. #2
    Super Member ArtsyOne's Avatar
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    I always cut on the bias because more threads are exposed on the edge, which I think protects against fraying from wear. I think that if the binding is cut on the straight grain, then there's only 1 thread at the outside edge that can wear through quickly. Bias is also necessary when binding scallops or rounded corners.
    A fabric stash is always missing that one fabric needed to finish the quilt on which you're working.

  3. #3
    Super Member DebraK's Avatar
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    mostly for curved projects, only because I'm lazy.
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  4. #4
    Super Member mom-6's Avatar
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    I have only used straight bindings except for the one i used purchased bias tape as a short cut. I have not done any with curved edges.

  5. #5
    Junior Member Suzette316's Avatar
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    My experience is that I have used straight grain binding for over fifteen years and not had problems with fraying or excessive wear (and my quilts are mainly snuggle, lap quilts that get washed a bit). I have only used bias binding when I was binding a curved quilt and once when I had striped fabric that I wanted to "swirl" around the outside of the quilt and I achieved that through cutting it on the bias. But generally speaking, I personally don't bother to cut it on the bias otherwise. For me, it's simply not worth the extra time and effort. But as with all things quilty, do what works for YOU and makes you happy!!

  6. #6
    Member Esmerelde's Avatar
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    I always do straight ones, but haven't done curved edges either.

  7. #7
    Senior Member lfletcher's Avatar
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    I only cut on the bias if I'm binding a curve.

  8. #8
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    I have done both. I determine the cut based on the type of fabric. If I use a thick backing, then I prefer bringing the backing to the front and doing a hem around it rather than binding. I posted a tutorial over in the tutorial section on how to do this without excess bulk on the corners. The thick backing (like minkee or fleece) is much sturdier than cotton binding.

    I do have one quilt with frayed binding that I need to cover up. It's been much loved so I'm not sure if it's because of the straight of grain or just lots of use over the years. The ones that I have hemmed show no stress on the edges.

    The worst that I have done was buying that ribbon binding for a baby quilt. After a few washings it looks horrible.

  9. #9
    Super Member pollyjvan9's Avatar
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    Usually straight cut unless it is for a curved edge quilt. Also I like stripes for bindings and I always cut these on the bias just because I like the way it looks.

  10. #10
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    i use the straight cut. but if curves are involved, i use bias.
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  11. #11
    Super Member GingerK's Avatar
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    Yep, ditto to what has already been said. I don't like the wasted fabric on bias binding and I think it is harder to get a nice flat finish on a bias binding because of its tendency to stretch. I have often pulled the backing fabric to the front especially on baby quilts. I want to try binding with a piping accent some time soon.
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  12. #12
    Super Member MartiMorga's Avatar
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    I am a new quilter - but I attended a trunk show by Janice Pope, and she started by repairing old quilts. She agreed that you get more threads on the bias to wear than on the straight of grain. She said that most of the repairs she has done was on worn and frayed binding. She always uses bias and strongly suggests that we all do. Interesting.
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  13. #13
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    straight binding for straight sides, mitered corners- bias binding for curved, scalloped edges
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  14. #14
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I use straight-grain binding almost exclusively because it is so much easier to work with than bias. When I do bias-grain binding (usually just because I want a candy-cane stripe on the diagonal, but bias is also necessary for curved edges), I have learned from experience to prewash the fabric (I don't usually prewash); otherwise shrinkage can create a wrinkled binding and skew the quilt from square. Also, if using bias strips, I heavily starch the fabric after prewashing so the bias doesn't stretch on me while sewing. It's so much less work to use straight-grain, that's what I usually use.

  15. #15
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    I only use straight-cut binding, except I have to sew curved bindings.

    Liebe Gre,
    Katharina

  16. #16
    Super Member maryb119's Avatar
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    I cut it on the straight grain if the side of the quilt are straight. If they are curved, then I cut it on the bias. I also like the look of plaid binding on the bias and I will us it on straight or curved borders.

  17. #17
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    99% of the time I will cut my binding strips on the bias even if my quilt edges are straight. To me, it just feels like it "hugs" the edge of the quilt better than straight of grain. If I only have a smaller piece of fabric for my binding, then I cut it straight of grain.
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  18. #18
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suzette316 View Post
    My experience is that I have used straight grain binding for over fifteen years and not had problems with fraying or excessive wear (and my quilts are mainly snuggle, lap quilts that get washed a bit). I have only used bias binding when I was binding a curved quilt and once when I had striped fabric that I wanted to "swirl" around the outside of the quilt and I achieved that through cutting it on the bias. But generally speaking, I personally don't bother to cut it on the bias otherwise. For me, it's simply not worth the extra time and effort. But as with all things quilty, do what works for YOU and makes you happy!!
    Suzette spoke every word of mine. Here I always straight grain unless on curves or scalloped borders.

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  19. #19
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    I have used both types, straight and bias. For me, straight is quick, uses less fabric and is trouble-free. But the finished edges seems stiff, to me, not supple and bendy, as the quilts bends. Bias takes longer to make, needs to be handled gently and carefully sewn to the sides. I always use bias when i have a stripe or a plaid. But the result is a luxurious feel to the suppleness of the quilt. I guess it could be compared to the difference between a Ford and a Cadillac. Both will get you there( a completed quilt), but what a difference in ride! Jmho. Do what works for you!

  20. #20
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    Straight grain binding for straight edge quilts. Bias grain binding for curve or scalloped edge quilts. OR occasionally I will cut striped fabric on the bias to get the stripes to look like a barber pole pattern.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by auntpiggylpn View Post
    99% of the time I will cut my binding strips on the bias even if my quilt edges are straight. To me, it just feels like it "hugs" the edge of the quilt better than straight of grain. If I only have a smaller piece of fabric for my binding, then I cut it straight of grain.
    You expressed how I feel about using bias binding well.

    I figure it takes the same number of square inches for a length of binding (length x width) no matter which way it's cut.

  22. #22
    Super Member mike'sgirl's Avatar
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    I was taught that it's not necessary to bind with bias unless you are doing a curved or scalloped quilt. Otherwise I use straight binding.

  23. #23
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    Ditto to straight cut binding for quilts with straight edges and bias binding for those with curved edges. While bias binding does take more fabric, it is lovely to see how nice it looks on a quilt!

  24. #24
    Super Member sharin'Sharon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlienQuilter View Post
    I have done both. I determine the cut based on the type of fabric. If I use a thick backing, then I prefer bringing the backing to the front and doing a hem around it rather than binding. I posted a tutorial over in the tutorial section on how to do this without excess bulk on the corners. The thick backing (like minkee or fleece) is much sturdier than cotton binding.

    I do have one quilt with frayed binding that I need to cover up. It's been much loved so I'm not sure if it's because of the straight of grain or just lots of use over the years. The ones that I have hemmed show no stress on the edges.

    The worst that I have done was buying that ribbon binding for a baby quilt. After a few washings it looks horrible.
    What is 'ribbon' binding? My first thought was 'blanket' binding, but can't imagine using it like you would bind a quilt, only edging on a blanket. Thanks.

  25. #25
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    Jenny from MSQC has a tutorial for binding. That's how I do it. or I purchase binding.

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