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Thread: Binding -- How can I keep the binding seams from ending up at a corner?

  1. #1
    Super Member LeslieFrost's Avatar
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    I usually use diagonal seams and piece the binding somewhat longer than needed. Then, I just begin putting it on the front, creating mitered corners as I go. If I get to a corner and have a binding seam, there's really nothing to do, is there?

    What could I do differently?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Super Member Quilter7x's Avatar
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    Sounds like Murphy's Law to me - that happens to me all the time! When you figure out how to not have this happen, you'll make a lot of other ladies very happy! :lol:

  3. #3
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    Lay the quilt out and lay the binding along the edges. If a seam is close to a corner move it one way or the other until there aren't any seams on any corner. Then put a big straight pin in the spot where you want to start.

  4. #4
    Super Member virtualbernie's Avatar
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    Why not do a test run? Run your binding around your quilt without sewing and you can get a general idea where the seams will fall and make adjustments on where to start attaching your binding.

  5. #5
    Super Member quiltinggirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen
    Lay the quilt out and lay the binding along the edges. If a seam is close to a corner move it one way or the other until there aren't any seams on any corner. Then put a big straight pin in the spot where you want to start.

    I use this method as well!!

  6. #6
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    simply measure your intersections on the binding then measure your quit and try to start within that paremeter!

  7. #7
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    I do a test run also. Put a pin where you want to start then go round the quilt.
    Adjust if needed. Yes, you have to roll that binding again but it's worth it. :-D

  8. #8
    Super Member PurplePassion's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by virtualbernie
    Why not do a test run? Run your binding around your quilt without sewing and you can get a general idea where the seams will fall and make adjustments on where to start attaching your binding.
    That's what I do, works great to think ahead.

  9. #9
    Super Member LeslieFrost's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaciqltznok
    simply measure your intersections on the binding then measure your quit and try to start within that paremeter!
    This is what I was looking for -- a way to reason it out, rather than lay the binding all the way around the quilt.

  10. #10
    Super Member AliKat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen
    Lay the quilt out and lay the binding along the edges. If a seam is close to a corner move it one way or the other until there aren't any seams on any corner. Then put a big straight pin in the spot where you want to start.
    I do this too. That way I can see if there will be a problem and be ready to adjust the binding before I get there. I still check a few feet away from each corner just in case I made an error. It is like measuring twice. Less errors this way.

    ali

  11. #11
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    Lol, I just make way to much & re-seam (is that a word) as I go.

  12. #12
    Senior Member qbquilts's Avatar
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    I try to pin the binding to the whole quilt before I start attaching it. If however, it looks like I'm still going to put the seam in a corner, I've been known to make a new seam a few inches before the offending seam. (Note, make sure you've got plenty of extra binding if doing this).

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by qbquilts
    I try to pin the binding to the whole quilt before I start attaching it. If however, it looks like I'm still going to put the seam in a corner, I've been known to make a new seam a few inches before the offending seam. (Note, make sure you've got plenty of extra binding if doing this).
    I do something similar - but I don't pin "well" - just enough to get an idea of how it's going to fit -

    I've found it's good to have some "extra" binding - just in case.

  14. #14
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    I always run (hand test) the binding around the entire quilt first before basting to see where the seams will end up. When I create the binding, I try to add an extra 2 ft longer than I need. That way, after checking where the seams will fall on the quilt edge, if the seam ends on the corner I have plenty of binding to back it up about 6" and readjust the beginning point of the binding.

  15. #15
    Super Member Dina's Avatar
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    I just put a pin in one spot and quickly run the rest along the edge without pins. Doesn't take long to see a problem, and then I just move the starting spot.

  16. #16
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    and if you find that after doing all this a seam still ends up unexpectedly at the corner.....stop and move the seam up

  17. #17
    Super Member dellareya's Avatar
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    I do a "test run". I pin the binding on to see where the intersections will be and then a adjust it accordingly.

  18. #18
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    I think this is what you need a fairy godmother for. It happens to me all the time, even if I pre-measure.

  19. #19
    Super Member snipforfun's Avatar
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    All the above suggestions are really good. I had to do a single fold bias binding on a scalloped border and I was really concerned about the seams ending up in the valley of the scallops and therefore put it off for a couple of years avoiding the probable problem. I received the direction to not conect the strips prior to sewing, but rather to attach them to each other as I go. That way I could control where the seams landed. Worked great and perfection was achieved!

  20. #20
    Super Member LeslieFrost's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Holice
    and if you find that after doing all this a seam still ends up unexpectedly at the corner.....stop and move the seam up
    Of course! Why didn't I think of that? Thanks, Holice!

  21. #21
    Member Cathou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeslieFrost
    Quote Originally Posted by Holice
    and if you find that after doing all this a seam still ends up unexpectedly at the corner.....stop and move the seam up
    Of course! Why didn't I think of that? Thanks, Holice!
    Move the seam up!?!?! I don't understand???

  22. #22
    Super Member SherriB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by true4uca
    Lol, I just make way to much & re-seam (is that a word) as I go.
    I like your idea!! :mrgreen: I always end up with extra binding anyway, so why not use on the quilt.

  23. #23
    Super Member donnajean's Avatar
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    This is what I do!

    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen
    Lay the quilt out and lay the binding along the edges. If a seam is close to a corner move it one way or the other until there aren't any seams on any corner. Then put a big straight pin in the spot where you want to start.

  24. #24
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cathou
    Move the seam up!?!?! I don't understand???
    When you are a couple of feet away from reaching a corner, lay out the binding to make sure that the seam in the binding is a couple of inches from the corner, one way or the other.

    If it's going to land right on the corner, cut next to the seam, remove a couple of inches (a little more more if you have used diagonal seams) and sew the binding seam again. Test it and make sure that the seam is well away from that corner and then go back to sewing on your binding. :)

  25. #25
    Senior Member sarahconner's Avatar
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    Do like a trial run, by measuring; running the binding all around the quilt before U sew it on

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