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Thread: Board basting a large quilt.....just wondering....

  1. #1
    Senior Member ruby2shoes's Avatar
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    Board basting a large quilt.....just wondering....

    For those of you who use this method I would be interested in your opinion on something that has me puzzled:

    Is it absolutely necessary that you roll your layers onto the boards whilst they are laid out on top of each other? Assuming you know that you have enough backing and batting to centre your top nicely why can't you lay each layer out and roll up that one before doing the next? Once rolled onto the boards they have to be moved around anyway and repositioned to then roll them out together for the basting...so is there something important about having them on top of each other that I am not understanding?

  2. #2
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    I believe they show them together so they can demonstrate rolling them out together. As long as you measured that all the layers were big enough, you could roll them separately.

  3. #3
    Super Member EmiliasNana's Avatar
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    I board baste with 505 on a ping pong table, first taping the backing right side down. I then position the batting over the backing and smooth it out, prior to rolling half way. I then spray the backing and carefully unroll the batting and pat down. Repeat on the other side. Now I position the top, right side up, on the batting squaring up if necessary. Once I have it in position, I roll it up from the short side half way and repeat the above. I have had tops and backing with only an inch difference (I quilt my own), but had to trim my batting the size of the backing after spraying to see where to position, but was able to baste it perfectly centered.

  4. #4
    Super Member Maureen NJ's Avatar
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    I’m not exactly sure what you are asking. I use the board method. Pulling the boards (I do them separately) allows you to get the fabric taut so you don’t have any wrinkles on the back. I also am constantly pushing the fabric away from me (where I’m doing the herringbone stitch) so the area I am stitching is nice and flat. Occasionally, I do separate the quilt top, batting and backing layers and flatten everything out again. Make sense. I love this method and have not had any wrinkles on the back. I do stitch the herringbone closer than I probably have to and it does take time but I put music on and go to work. I am contemplating basting a large (105x120”) quilt top vs. having someone LA baste it or LA SID. Here’s an of my herringbone basting.
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  5. #5
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    Nice job Maureen. Thanks for the picture, I have heard of this but still just learning about it. I have finished a lap rug and a throw, another flimsy almost finished is also a throw so that one I am not worried about but after that they are getting bigger and then I will have to try this. How far apart are those stitches?
    EmiliasNana I don't understand "505". Oh, is that the spray you are using?
    Ruby2shoes I look forward to that answer.

  6. #6
    Senior Member ruby2shoes's Avatar
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    Thankyou everyone.

  7. #7
    Senior Member gmcsewer's Avatar
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    I stick pins in my backing into my cutting board (cardboard) and stretch it across and pin the other side. Then I lay my batting over that and stick pins in it. Then lay on my quilt and stick it down at the first edge and stretch it slightly and stick pins in the other edge. I baste with safety pins every four or five inches both ways. When I have finished what fits on the table, I pull out the stuck pins and move the whole thing up. Again stick ins in the backing at the new position, batting and quilt stretching each as you go. I do fmq with this method and do not have wrinkles on the back or front. Hope you understand what I have said.

  8. #8
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    My method is a bit odd but I can sandwich up a large quilt (twin or double sized bed) in about 10 minutes

    Roll the ironed quilt top on a sturdy cardboard tube. Make sure it is rolled straight
    Then lay out the batting/wadding out on the table with the bulk hanging over the back. Make sure there are no creases in it.
    Place the rolled quilt top on the batting a few inches in from the table edge nearest to you (so there is extra batting showing)
    Apply spray baste edge to edge and about 6 inches deep on the batting and then roll the tube away from you.
    Repeat until quilt top is basted to batting. If you come to the edge of the table before the top is fully basted or feel you are leaning too far, then pull the unbasted section towards you.
    Pick up the basted batting and quilt top and flip it over so you are now looking at the batting
    Roll backing fabric onto the tube
    Repeat the process as above except this time make sure there is no exposed batting nearest you.

    I find handling wooden boards too difficult and heavy for my hands, the sturdy cardboard tubes are the ones that hold the huge rolls of upholstery fabric. Rolling is great if you are using spray baste as there is an even and continuous pressure across the width of the sandwich. I don't have to smooth the fabric with my hands or tape anything down.

    Also with cardboard there is less risk to my dining table. I cover the table with an extra large cheap shower curtain which is rinsed and hung out on the line.
    Last edited by HettyB; 04-28-2019 at 03:27 PM.
    HettyB
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  9. #9
    Senior Member Quiltah Mama's Avatar
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    HettyB, great description and technique, thank you, I will have to try that next time I need to sandwich something, and no on the floor on my hands and knees, that is the best part.
    To many quilts, not enough wine.

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  10. #10
    Super Member Maureen NJ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kelsie View Post
    Nice job Maureen. Thanks for the picture, I have heard of this but still just learning about it. I have finished a lap rug and a throw, another flimsy almost finished is also a throw so that one I am not worried about but after that they are getting bigger and then I will have to try this. How far apart are those stitches?
    EmiliasNana I don't understand "505". Oh, is that the spray you are using?
    Ruby2shoes I look forward to that answer.
    The stitches are about 2” apart. I use a long needle.

  11. #11
    Power Poster ube quilting's Avatar
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    This sounds like the method Sharon Shamber teaches in one of the videos. google and watch her and it will refresh the technique for you. I love this method.
    no act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted. Aesop

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