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Thread: Can someone explain to me why

  1. #1
    Senior Member auniqueview's Avatar
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    do so many stores carry really cute flannel prints just perfect for babies and children, but when you look at the fabric, it carries the warning "not suitable for pjs, robes, blankets...you name it, for babies and children under 12.

    How many children over 12 want all these things with little bunnies and turtles and frogs peeking out from behind flowers? Or puppies scampering? I am talking baby patterns?

    IS there some logic to this I am missing? If they are going to print these cute things on flannel, why not make it usable for babies and young kids?

  2. #2
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    They're not treated w/ a flame retardant chemical that is required on fabric used for clothing (I asked a fabric shop about this once). And, in today's society, someone would probably sue if the warning weren't there. That being said...I use them all the time for those kinds of items, not just quilts.

  3. #3
    Super Member AliKat's Avatar
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    The fabric makers need to CYA in case of a chile being hurt while near the fabric ... as in a fire.

    Hey, if someone can sue McDonald's for too hot coffee ... almost anything goes.

    ali

  4. #4
    QM
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    The law requires the warning. This law came about because of a very vocal mother who used RAYON pjs, with the predictasble results. For any who do not know, Rayon is virtually an explosive waiting for any spark. My father demo'ed this for me when I was a small person, but until the law changed (and manufacturers lost lawsuits) rayon was regularly used for baby clothing. The flame retardants are also carcinogens, but let's not go into the logic of that one.

  5. #5
    Senior Member auniqueview's Avatar
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    So if I make some bibs, burb cloths, etc from them, I am not risking the child's life?

  6. #6
    k3n
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    Quote Originally Posted by auniqueview
    So if I make some bibs, burb cloths, etc from them, I am not risking the child's life?
    I would say no more than if you use regular quilter's cotton which isn't treated with flame retardant either... as others have said, it's just the manufacturers protecting themselves against lawsuits. In the labels of my kids' pjs it always says 'do not place near a fire' - but then who would place ANY child near a fire, no matter what they were wearing? :-)

  7. #7
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    You are far better using flannel/cotton/wool for any of those items as opposed to any synthetic material. If there is a fire or any sort, the natural fibers will burn but will not melt into the skin like synthetics do. Much less risk of serious injury with natural fibers.

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    I agree! The cotton won't melt. That's y they tell u when u fly to wear cotton, no nylons! I don't want all the chemicals near my baby or child either!! Saw a program on new mattress 's that there are sooo many chemicals on because ppl fall asleep with cigarettes ! They are toxic but will burn slow!!

  9. #9
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    i use the flannels for kids all of the time. the manufacturer is just putting the warning there because it's the law and it protects them against law suits.

  10. #10
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    many of us have been making our children (and grandchildren) flannel pajamas for years---without the added chemicals---none of mine have suffered adverse effects from the clothes i've made them-
    if they ever caught fire the flannel would burn up- like any other fabric not treated with flame retardant chemicals.
    warnings have to be on everything in this 'sue happy' country we live in

  11. #11
    Junior Member PatchGirl's Avatar
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    I watched a report one time that said the most flamable thing in your entire house is your mattress! Go figure...

  12. #12
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by auniqueview
    So if I make some bibs, burb cloths, etc from them, I am not risking the child's life?
    Yes and no ... in a much lesser way than long, full body cover garments

  13. #13
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    whooooops .... no caffine yet, so my finger got a little trigger happy! :)

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    The melting factor is why I would never use "green" quilt batting. We live in a society that has to be told not to put a plastic bag over its head.

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    How did I manage to get this old? And raise 3 children without them burning up in their flannel pajamas?
    People today want a guarantee on life's experiences that are their responsibility. No one can prevent a fire unless they use common sense and don't start one. Everything around us can't be made fireproof but we can all be aware of the dangers of fire.
    Most of us have used flannel without the retardant for clothing and bedding. I agree, what is the sense of making flannel for children's clothing if you can't use it for them. I say, use whatever flannel you see you like and love your children so much, you will prevent fires in your own home by not using candles or smoking, they cause the most fires.

    Carol J.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NJ Quilter
    You are far better using flannel/cotton/wool for any of those items as opposed to any synthetic material. If there is a fire or any sort, the natural fibers will burn but will not melt into the skin like synthetics do. Much less risk of serious injury with natural fibers.
    this is true; years ago when there was so much polyester and like in fabrics children in fires were getting severly burned because the fabric would melt to their skins. You rarely see those types of fabrics now w/childrens themes on them. Now fabrics w/children themes comes w/warnings to protect the companies. I don't blame them; there are some who will sue even if the know the damage is due to their own negligence

  17. #17
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    Agreed!! I use all the time for baby blankets, etc.

    I would say no more than if you use regular quilter's cotton which isn't treated with flame retardant either... as others have said, it's just the manufacturers protecting themselves against lawsuits. In the labels of my kids' pjs it always says 'do not place near a fire' - but then who would place ANY child near a fire, no matter what they were wearing? :-)[/quote]

  18. #18
    Senior Member SUZAG's Avatar
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    When I asked a clerk at JoAnne's if they had any that was safe for children's sleepwear she said that they didn't and I had a choice of putting my child in a non-chemically treated garment that I make and not putting her over a flame or giving her matches or buying a pre-made that is chemically treated with carcinogens...what a choice!

  19. #19
    Senior Member luvnquilt's Avatar
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    Manufacturers have to cover their rear-ends. If you look at the patterns in the 'sleepwear' section, they all say that they are not suitable for childrens sleepwear.

  20. #20
    Super Member patski's Avatar
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    why do they put warnings? check out strollers now, they say "remove child before collapsing stroller" OMG how did we know this without the warnings????

  21. #21
    Super Member CorgiNole's Avatar
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    It is our CYA society. Because if the manufacturers don't put it on the label someone WILL sue them.

    I prefer the natural fabrics to the chemically treated ones any day of the week.

    Cheers, K

    And slightly off topic - why can't I find some of the cute prints in MY size. Sure a tween or teen might not appreciate the whimsy of some of the designs. But Moms with a sense of humor definitely appreciate the whimsy.

  22. #22
    Super Member valsma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AliKat
    The fabric makers need to CYA in case of a chile being hurt while near the fabric ... as in a fire.

    Hey, if someone can sue McDonald's for too hot coffee ... almost anything goes.

    ali
    Yup in our sue happy world this is why they put warnings on almost everything.

  23. #23
    Power Poster lynnie's Avatar
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    i have to admidt, that at 52, i make my pj's out of these fabs.

  24. #24
    Senior Member auniqueview's Avatar
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    I guess I can always include a note, please do not set fire to the baby, lol. I don't believe either parent smokes, either.

  25. #25
    Super Member wvdek's Avatar
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    If I understand what you are asking, I too have wondered why they don't offer a better vaiety of prints for older children and for adults out of these wonderful flannels. I have to look high and low before buying one I don't think is too infantile or babyish for my jammies. One reason I guess why so many of mine are plain. I live in jammies in the winter - warmer and more comfortable.

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