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Thread: Can you embroider on a normal sewing machine

  1. #1
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    Hi,

    I was just wondering if this was possible because I want to put names on Cuffs for Christmas stockings but I haven't a clue how to???????? I have a newish sewing machine and I also have a newish longarm so I don't want to be forking out for a cutting machine with expensive dies or an embroidery machine and I certainly won't be able to hand embroider (would love to be able!)

    Thanks for any ideas you might have ladies and gents x Oh aaaaaaaaaaaand I know about doing it on a printer as I even bought the paper that you can print onto fabric BUT at the moment the only access I have to a printer is my husbands work one and he doesn't want me using it :( so maybe I'm snookered :-(

  2. #2
    Super Member auntpiggylpn's Avatar
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    You could trace the letters (backwards of course!) onto the back of a fusible then fuse it to your fabric and cut them out by hand. Fuse the fabric to the cuff of the stocking and then do a satin stitch, zig zag or blanket stitch around the edges.

  3. #3
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    We did some freeform threadplay on the machine in a class. Not sure that I liked the effect - it looked a bit sloppy.

  4. #4
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
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    I have embroidered names on cuffs of stockings using rayon thread and a wide, very close together zizgzag stitch. It looked like satin. I did mine in script so it wouldn't look blocky.

  5. #5
    Super Member gzuslivz's Avatar
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    My grandmother taught sewing for the Singer Co. and she could embroider on a black Singer that only went forward and backward. But then, she was amazing! When I get her samples from my Mom, I will post them.

  6. #6
    Super Member hopetoquilt's Avatar
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    http://www.amazon.com/Calligraphy-Th...4676317&sr=8-1

    Link to book called Calligraphy with Thread. This is the older edition, hence cheaper. Explains clearly how to do this.

  7. #7
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    yes you can. it was being done long before the age of electronic and digital and fancy embroidery machines. In fact I have seen it done on a tredle machine. get a spring needle and do it in an embroidery hoop. Trace the lettering you want to do and do thread play type stitching.

  8. #8
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    Hi,
    use some scrap fabric. I have embroidered names by free motion. Drop the feed dogs, bring up your thread. But first trace the names on several sheets of paper, then practice writing them. Have the paper and writing same size of the cuff you will be using. This helps the mind remember the motion of cursive. Just remember to relax, move your fabric slowly ; sew as if you were writing with a pen or pencil. It takes a lot of practice, but eventually the flow will come. You could also use a pen made for fabric to put a personal touch to your work. Good luck

  9. #9
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    I have hand printed names on fabric and used the satin stitch to sew over the pencil marks.

  10. #10
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    Thanks ladies and maybe gents. I have seen Dritz applique iron ons which I will try and maybe when my kids are older and I have more time I will practice on my sewing machine.

    Thanks a million for the tips though because my mother loved embroidering so I would like to try it out! BUT on a machine. I'm a machine girl :)Just not patient enough with the hands.

  11. #11
    Senior Member connie_1936's Avatar
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    have you thought about using heat adhereing gem stones? joann and most craft stores sell them and the applicaters

  12. #12
    Super Member lalaland's Avatar
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    I think you can free hand embroider on any machine.

    On my mom's 1940's Kenmore, we put the stitch length on zero and released the tension from the tension bar and you could sew in any direction. We didn't add a darning foot, we just removed the foot and stitched.

    On my old Brother VX, which is 25 years old, you put the stitch length on zero and put a plate over the feed dogs (the plate came with the machine), add a darning foot and you can embroider or free motion.

  13. #13
    Super Member montanajan's Avatar
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    Yes, yes yes.
    Years ago, I used to embroider using my old Kenmore machine. Here are some things I learned:

    1) Use only a hoop you can tighten with a screwdriver - the fabric must be VERY tight in the hoop for crisp lettering or other embroidery. (check thrift stores for hoops) - I'd go with a hoop that is about 6 to 8 inches diameter & move as necessary (hard to keep it tight on a larger hoop)
    2) Drop the feed dogs
    3) Use good quality thread and a new needle
    4) Use tracing paper to transfer your pattern or lettering to the fabric on which you sew
    5) Place your hands around the sides of the hoop and guide the fabric around to create the lettering or pattern you have transferred.
    6) good idea to sew fabric to a thin layer of muslin for stability prior to doing the embroidery
    I made many baby gifts, bibs, portable tie-on quilted high chair supports, quilt squares, pictures and lettering on T-shirts for my kids, and have never had an embroidery machine.
    Have fun.

  14. #14
    Super Member jemma's Avatar
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    yes you can do hand embroidery--just need a teacher--thread painting is just like cokouring in with a pencil--lay down the threads to make a shape

  15. #15
    Super Member montanajan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lalaland
    I think you can free hand embroider on any machine.

    On my mom's 1940's Kenmore, we put the stitch length on zero and released the tension from the tension bar and you could sew in any direction. We didn't add a darning foot, we just removed the foot and stitched.

    On my old Brother VX, which is 25 years old, you put the stitch length on zero and put a plate over the feed dogs (the plate came with the machine), add a darning foot and you can embroider or free motion.
    Thanks, Lalaland - forgot to mention stitch length to zero.

    Also - try ebay for books on machine embroidery - once were sold prior to newer embroidery-specific machines.

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