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Thread: Can you have more than one layer of batting in a quilt?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Jan in FL's Avatar
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    Can you have more than one layer of batting in a quilt?

    I am fortunate to have several bolts of 100% high quality cotton batting for quilting recently gifted to me. They are all the thin - I would go as far as to say the thinnest - batting you can buy. The brands are Warm & Natural and others comparable to this brand. I want to make a quilt or two a little heavier and a little thicker. Can I put two layers of batting in the quilt? It will be quilted on a longarm. Any immediate or long term issues? Has anyone ever done this? Thanks for any advice.

  2. #2
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    You can do anything you want, but why would you put two layers of warm and natural in a quilt. That batting in itself is thin but very warm.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Jan in FL's Avatar
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    My daughters want a quilt heavier than the ones I have been making like the ones they have that my grandmother made. They each have a quilt passed down from her through four generations - some with the pieces and batting almost nonexistent in a few places and all made from flour sacks. They have requested new ones that can be passed down from them to their kids (like I haven't made each grandchild their own already). They say they old ones from my grandmother have been through all their parents and grandparents and they are more special and connected. But one of their favorite things is the weight of the quilt on top of them when they snuggle under it. The only way I can think of to give them that feature is more batting.

  4. #4
    Super Member alleyoop1's Avatar
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    There really aren't any quilt police (although some people think they are honorary members!) so it's your quilt, your decision. Put in one layer or several layers. Back it with muslin, flannel, fleece, quilt fabric, or anything you want. Tie it, hand stitch it, or machine stitch it in any pattern you want. Remember, this is YOUR quilt and YOU design it to be what you want. No rules, only the satisfaction of doing it your way for yourself and/or your family and friends.

  5. #5
    Junior Member chiaraquilts's Avatar
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    This longarm quilter- http://greenfairyquilts.blogspot.com/- often mentions using two batts on her quilts. There are lots of photos of some truly amazing quilting, btw, a really fun blog.
    Chiara Kate

  6. #6
    Senior Member Wendys Quilts's Avatar
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    I actually did one with two layers on my frame. The batting I used tho was from walmart and not cotton. It made the quilt HEAVY and fluffy. I think my step son will live it.
    I, however, won't do double batting again on my frame. It was difficult for me to do.

  7. #7
    Senior Member chaskaquilter's Avatar
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    I just finished a queen size, 5" squares, quilt for my daughter. She also wanted a heavier quilt. I used two queen size Quilters Dream batts. Darn thing weighed a ton. I tied it. She loves it. It drapes off the corners of her bed beautifully. I need a cool room when I sleep. Don't think I would like the quilt, but this is what a quilt should be in her mind.

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    My only comment would be not to try to hand-quilt 2 layers of W&N...ask me how I know. Since you're doing it on a machine that shouldn't be a problem. Especially since W&N is kind of 'sticky' anyhow I don't think you'd have much of a shifting issue as long as it's reasonably well basted. That being said, I agree the one layer of W&N is pretty heavy and warm all on it's own but I understand complying with the wishes of your children.

  9. #9
    Super Member jmabby's Avatar
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    I am with your daughters, I love the thicker quilts, the next one I make for myself will have two layers of
    Warm and Natural in them.

  10. #10
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    I did one for my son and DIL and used a wool layer and a cotton layer on her side of the quilt as she is always cold and he is hot. Worked great.

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    Let us know how it turns out.
    Linda

  12. #12
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    I frequently use double batting. I use a layer of W&N and a layer of poly. Love the results! My local source for Long Arm services would not do it, so I switched to those that would. It creates a bit of higher loft and gives the quilting more definition. Plus its warmer! I use poly as the second batting ... it keeps the weight lower, and drapes better than two layers of Warm and Natural.

  13. #13
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    you can if you want to---layering your batting not only adds loft but also helps the stitching stand out---can really enhance the quilting on a quilt- some quilters layer a cotton and a wool batt- they are wonderful quilts! stunningly beautiful quilting-and lofty/fluffy/warm as a bonus.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jan in FL View Post
    I am fortunate to have several bolts of 100% high quality cotton batting for quilting recently gifted to me. They are all the thin - I would go as far as to say the thinnest - batting you can buy. The brands are Warm & Natural and others comparable to this brand. I want to make a quilt or two a little heavier and a little thicker. Can I put two layers of batting in the quilt? It will be quilted on a longarm. Any immediate or long term issues? Has anyone ever done this? Thanks for any advice.
    not only can you but i do, frequently. i prefer the cotton battings for the base with a very thin layer of poly on top. they grip each other nicely and have the wonderful properties of both types. the cotton (which i use exclusively for wallhangings because of the great way it lays flat and square on the wall) maintains the shape while the thin poly puffs into the quilted designs in a way the cotton never does. the dimension they give together is really nice...the purple quilt is not hanging straight as it is on the barn wall but i think you can see how flat the corners and binding lays while the feathers have dimension. the orange quilt border is not bound in the pic but it is a modern rendition of circs and feathers and the extra layer really makes this show up...in addition, don't forget ALL trapunto quilts have a second layer in selected areas.... do what you think is good...it will be just right.
    Attached Images Attached Images


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    sorry, thought of one other online pic with this combo
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by deemail; 12-10-2011 at 12:50 PM.

  16. #16
    Super Member newbee3's Avatar
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    I am making a quilt for my son and he reguested the same thing he wanted it heavy so I had some fabric that I believe has some wool in it. I have washed and dryed it and it did shirink about 2" I am going to put that on the back no batting required. Years ago they put blankets inside for batting and for backing and some of these quilts are still around they even used material from old dress and shirts so do anything you want it is your quilt and you are making it. I do not make mine for shows I make mine for family members to use

  17. #17
    Junior Member Taino Jan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alleyoop1 View Post
    There really aren't any quilt police (although some people think they are honorary members!) so it's your quilt, your decision. Put in one layer or several layers. Back it with muslin, flannel, fleece, quilt fabric, or anything you want. Tie it, hand stitch it, or machine stitch it in any pattern you want. Remember, this is YOUR quilt and YOU design it to be what you want. No rules, only the satisfaction of doing it your way for yourself and/or your family and friends.
    Well said. And don't forget you can mix and match any color, style or technique. Have fun quilting.
    Rules of Life:1-Don't take anything personally 2-Integrity of words and deeds 3-Don't make assumptions 4-Do your best

  18. #18
    Super Member caspharm's Avatar
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    No problem with two layers. When I went to my LA class that was included with my Innova purchase, the dealer/instructor had a whole collection of samples made that paired up different combinations of batting (cotton/cotton, cotton/wool, wool/poly, etc). Besides, trapunto is created with two layers. All depends on what's the purpose.

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    Quote Originally Posted by deemail View Post
    sorry, thought of one other online pic with this combo
    Deemail: thanks for posting your nice pictures. Helps to actually see the results of your batt layering.

  20. #20
    Super Member hperttula123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lori S View Post
    I frequently use double batting. I use a layer of W&N and a layer of poly. Love the results! My local source for Long Arm services would not do it, so I switched to those that would. It creates a bit of higher loft and gives the quilting more definition. Plus its warmer! I use poly as the second batting ... it keeps the weight lower, and drapes better than two layers of Warm and Natural.
    I've never put poly and warm and natural together. Don't know why I didn't think of that before....duh moment!!!! lol!!! I bet that works great. One layer of warm and natural is not warm enough for me. Right now, my youngest daughter has offered to let me use her quilt which is one layer of white and bright(poly) and minkee on the back. It's one of the warmest quilts we have. She is always so warm she don't use it much.
    I will be trying that with my next quilt.
    enjoy your life...it's the only one you have!!!
    Heather

  21. #21
    Senior Member Jan in FL's Avatar
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    Thank you all for the wonderful advice! I am no longer concerned about using two layers. Apparently, my options are vast.....the pictures did really help and, Deemail, your work is beautiful. I just didn't want to put in all the time and effort on the piecing end to have it ruined with a quilting mistake. You ladies cleared up so many questions about batting for me. I got much more than I asked for (you answered the questions I should have asked but didn't know I needed to ask!) and it will help me so much in the future! Now I need to decide what combo I will use!

  22. #22
    Super Member Val in IN's Avatar
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    It's your quilt (or your Daughter's) and you can do it however you want to. That being said, I will agree with NJ Quilter. I wouldn't try to handquilt it unless you plan to use BIG STITCH quilting (you would probably have to use a really large needle). You could also tie it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jan in FL View Post
    Thank you all for the wonderful advice! I am no longer concerned about using two layers. ... Now I need to decide what combo I will use!
    Please share your results with us when you finish it. Thanks for asking this; I learned things I didn't know that I didn't know, too.

  24. #24
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Yes, absolutely. I know of an award-winning quilter who uses 2 layers of batting. She puts wool on top because it shows the quilting off very well.

  25. #25
    Super Member Edie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jan in FL View Post
    I am fortunate to have several bolts of 100% high quality cotton batting for quilting recently gifted to me. They are all the thin - I would go as far as to say the thinnest - batting you can buy. The brands are Warm & Natural and others comparable to this brand. I want to make a quilt or two a little heavier and a little thicker. Can I put two layers of batting in the quilt? It will be quilted on a longarm. Any immediate or long term issues? Has anyone ever done this? Thanks for any advice.
    I was told by the lady that does my LAQ'ing that if you use more than one layer of batting it may not turn out as nice. (It can get bunched up.) I guess with LAQ'ing, the machine is more picky about what it quilts, where if you hand quilt or tie, you are only going to make a hole in your finger!!!!!! (For that I use three Band-Aids!!!!) I use only Warm and Natural. Edie

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