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Thread: Can you identify these two quilt blocks?

  1. #1
    Senior Member debp33's Avatar
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    My mom gave me two sets of quilt blocks. Set one came from my great grandmother. Since my great grandmother passed away more than 40 years ago, I know they're old. Set number two was given to my mom so she doesn't know how old these are.

    I've looked through pictures on the internet and in some books I have, but am having a hard time identifying what the blocks are called.

    With all the experienced quilters here I'm hoping someone here could easily identify them.

    Thank you in advance!

    Set 1
    Name:  Attachment-172068.jpe
Views: 59
Size:  72.8 KB

    Identified! - Double T block
    Name:  Attachment-172092.jpe
Views: 68
Size:  56.8 KB

  2. #2
    Super Member SaraSewing's Avatar
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    LOVE that yellow/blue one!

  3. #3
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    The blue & yellow look like a "T " block in one of my books. I'm not sure of the name. :-)
    I don't know the other one , sorry :-(

  4. #4
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    The first one looks like a simple nine patch. The way it's turned makes it look like it's on point. What a nice keepsake from your great grandmother. Treasure it!
    MLOQuilts in OKC

  5. #5
    Senior Member kellen46's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by debp33
    My mom gave me two sets of quilt blocks. Set one came from my great grandmother. Since my great grandmother passed away more than 40 years ago, I know they're old. Set number two was given to my mom so she doesn't know how old these are.

    I've looked through pictures on the internet and in some books I have, but am having a hard time identifying what the blocks are called.

    With all the experienced quilters here I'm hoping someone here could easily identify them.

    Thank you in advance!
    The second block is called the "double T block. It was made for the Temperance Union movement in the US the was popular from about 1800 to Prohibition. Blocks were made and sold for a few cents to support the movement. Full size quilts would have been made and the signatures of members written on it to be actioned off as well. If you ever find a signed quilt it is worth a great deal of money. If you go to the Quilt in a day website, media center listed under the March posting of quilts of the first ladies you will find a lot of history and a very easy way to cut and assemble this block. www.quiltinaday.com/theater

  6. #6
    Senior Member debp33's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mloquilts
    The first one looks like a simple nine patch. The way it's turned makes it look like it's on point. What a nice keepsake from your great grandmother. Treasure it!
    MLOQuilts in OKC
    So is it meant to be turned on it's corner? (As opposed to the way I took the picture.)

  7. #7
    Senior Member Hen3rietta's Avatar
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    #2 is "Capital T" from Household Magazine - Barbara Brackman's Encyclopedia ofQuilt Patterns #1662c

    I haven't found the first one yet.

  8. #8
    Super Member Dragonfly Nana's Avatar
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    Way to go Hen3rietta! I think the first one was called "Hot Crossed Buns" My great gran also had one like that.

  9. #9
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    It can be turned either way, depending on how it was put together. When a pattern is on point, there are fill-in blocks around the sides, top & bottom. Do a Google search to see examples of on point blocks. You should be able to find them. Seeing is better than for me to try to explain here.
    MLOQuilts :-)

  10. #10
    Senior Member debp33's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kellen46
    The second block is called the "double T block. It was made for the Temperance Union movement in the US the was popular from about 1800 to Prohibition. Blocks were made and sold for a few cents to support the movement. Full size quilts would have been made and the signatures of members written on it to be actioned off as well. If you ever find a signed quilt it is worth a great deal of money. If you go to the Quilt in a day website, media center listed under the March posting of quilts of the first ladies you will find a lot of history and a very easy way to cut and assemble this block. www.quiltinaday.com/theater
    Wow, what a great resource the quilt in a day videos are! Thanks for the quick identification. After watching the video, I'm sure it's that Double T. Thank you!

  11. #11
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hen3rietta
    #2 is "Capital T" from Household Magazine - Barbara Brackman's Encyclopedia ofQuilt Patterns #1662c

    I haven't found the first one yet.
    According to Maggie Malone's book, the Capital T block from Household Magazine has an open square in the center (would be tan in the block shown). The one with a center where all four T's meet (would be blue in the block shown) is known as the Double T (Nancy Page) and Four T Square (Nancy Cabot).

  12. #12
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    Again according to Maggie Malone's book, the top one is known as Tenallytown Square (Nancy Cabot) and Washington Pavement.

    There is a similar, slightly different, block with seaming differences in the way the long cross pieces flow in the two lower X's (they match the top X's in this one), that is called the Red Cross Quilt (Kansas City Star) and Washington Sidewalk.

  13. #13
    Super Member mtspools's Avatar
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    first one might be the X block

  14. #14
    Super Member fabric whisperer's Avatar
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    darn, I just got all excited thinking I found the top one for you, the "signature block"... but its not right...
    Attached Images Attached Images

  15. #15
    Super Member BKrenning's Avatar
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    Barbara Brackman has the first set listed as "Red Cross" and the second set as "Four T's", "The T Block" and "The T Quilt."

  16. #16
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BKrenning
    Barbara Brackman has the first set listed as "Red Cross" and the second set as "Four T's", "The T Block" and "The T Quilt."
    Look at the piecing in the bottom two X's in Brachman's book. Do they match the ones directly above them or the ones diagonally above them? If directly above, it's Red Cross, if not (like the photo above), it's not.

  17. #17
    Super Member BKrenning's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghostrider
    Quote Originally Posted by BKrenning
    Barbara Brackman has the first set listed as "Red Cross" and the second set as "Four T's", "The T Block" and "The T Quilt."
    Look at the piecing in the bottom two X's in Brachman's book. Do they match the ones directly above them or the ones diagonally above them? If directly above, it's Red Cross, if not (like the photo above), it's not.
    On my version of Block Base it shows the blocks that are diagonal from each other with the seams going the same direction. I haven't looked in the book yet but I consider the color placement and overall design more important to naming a block than which direction the seams run. They only show one block in the book and it isn't even a picture of a "real" block--only a solidly colored mock up.

  18. #18
    Senior Member debp33's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BKrenning
    Quote Originally Posted by ghostrider
    Quote Originally Posted by BKrenning
    Barbara Brackman has the first set listed as "Red Cross" and the second set as "Four T's", "The T Block" and "The T Quilt."
    Look at the piecing in the bottom two X's in Brachman's book. Do they match the ones directly above them or the ones diagonally above them? If directly above, it's Red Cross, if not (like the photo above), it's not.
    On my version of Block Base it shows the blocks that are diagonal from each other with the seams going the same direction. I haven't looked in the book yet but I consider the color placement and overall design more important to naming a block than which direction the seams run. They only show one block in the book and it isn't even a picture of a "real" block--only a solidly colored mock up.
    I don't have that book, so I'll have to trust others on it.

    It sounds like maybe we don't know for sure on that first block?

    Thanks for your work on this!

  19. #19
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    Personally, I'd go with Washington Pavement. As I said earlier, that's what it is in Maggie Malone's book and here is a link to the MSU Quilt Index with a sample quilt of that pattern. Both are recognized authorities.
    http://www.quiltindex.org/basicdispl...kid=1E-3D-1AA9

  20. #20
    Super Member BKrenning's Avatar
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    I think any of the names for the first block will suffice. Look at how many different patterns are called Bethlehem Star! They didn't have the internet back then so no easy way to check & see if your name was all ready taken causing many duplicate, triplicate, "x"licated names. Here are the 3 from Block Base (The digital version of the Encyclopedia of Pieced Quilt Patterns) so you can decide or make up your own name.

    Red Cross
    Name:  Attachment-173010.jpe
Views: 498
Size:  50.4 KB

    Washington Pavement
    Name:  Attachment-173011.jpe
Views: 80
Size:  48.4 KB

    Washington Sidewalk
    Name:  Attachment-173015.jpe
Views: 84
Size:  49.3 KB

  21. #21
    Senior Member debp33's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BKrenning
    I think any of the names for the first block will suffice. Look at how many different patterns are called Bethlehem Star! They didn't have the internet back then so no easy way to check & see if your name was all ready taken causing many duplicate, triplicate, "x"licated names. Here are the 3 from Block Base (The digital version of the Encyclopedia of Pieced Quilt Patterns) so you can decide or make up your own name.
    Looks pretty accurate to me. Thank you!

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