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Thread: Complaint About Me

  1. #51
    ruthieg's Avatar
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    I don't know if this makes sense, but my husband is right handed (forced by his father) and is left eye dominant. This made great problems when he hunted and lined up his cross hairs. Aiming a little to the right corrected his problem. Just a suggestion.

  2. #52

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    Most machine have a 1/4" foot with a flange on the side to run your fabric up to. You still have to be careful because you can push to fabric up and by the time it get to the needle it is larger than your 1/4". Slowing down help especially in the beginning. On my machine, I am able to move the needle over to make any size seam I need.

  3. #53
    Senior Member BRenea's Avatar
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    My MIL was complaining about not being able to sew a straight seam anymore just yesterday...she sews like a bat out of hell, so she probably just needs to slow it down! :lol:

  4. #54
    Dee
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    I sew slower and put the foot on edge of fabric, for 1/4 " seam. The needle is ok now since I put a yellow post note in back of needle to thread. Works great.

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dee
    I sew slower and put the foot on edge of fabric, for 1/4 " seam. The needle is ok now since I put a yellow post note in back of needle to thread. Works great.
    my sewing machine has a white strip on the shank I agree with you that it makes it easy to thread the needle

  6. #56
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    The two things that I do to help with seams, use the dual feed feature[even feed foot will work] and watch the edge or marked line. If I worry about what the needle is doing I wander all over the place.

  7. #57
    Super Member mhansen6's Avatar
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    There are 1/4 inch feet that have a guide blade that works wonderfully. I think most manufacturers make them. I wouldn't be without it now. Sure makes sewing a straight line easier.

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhansen6
    There are 1/4 inch feet that have a guide blade that works wonderfully. I think most manufacturers make them. I wouldn't be without it now. Sure makes sewing a straight line easier.
    Yeah, but I just bought a Brother, and the $15.00 foot is NOT 1/4 inch. It is more like 6/16ths's, a BIG difference. Plus, I have NEVER had a problem sewing a straight seam. This machine will NOT give me a straight seam. I've always been able to sew up to a pin, stop with needle down, pull the pin & then continue without any problems. On this machine, even if I stop with needle down, and don't continue until the needle is completely out, it will jog the fabric and give me a crooked seam. This is the SQ9000, which I bought until I could afford a better machine. But after this, I definitely will not even consider another Brother, no matter HOW top of the line. It is SO frustrating to see that ugly crooked line and have to go back and resew every freaking intersection. Arrgh!!

  9. #59
    Super Member Teresa 54's Avatar
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    keep your head straight and in the same position when
    sewing a straight line. Don't look at the needle, use the side of the foot to guide you.

  10. #60
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by winia
    Why is it when I have everything lined up, a foot that has markings on it that I follow rather than the needle I still can't sew in a straight line? What is wrong with me? It's extremely annoying.
    I'll tell you the same thing I used to tell my students (and I still have to do myself at times).

    1. Did you check to see if there is enough pressure on your fabric. There is an adjustment you can make by tightening a screw at the top (well, that's where mine is -- check your manual) that will cause the presser foot of lean harder on your fabric.

    2. If you don't have a quarter-inch foot, do this. Take a pad of small post-its and split the pad so that you have about 1/3 or 1/2 of the pad. Adhere that to the plate of your machine at the place where the edge of you fabric will touch -- 1/4 inch away from the needle for a quarter inch seam, 1/2 inch away from the needle for a half inch seam, etc.

    3. When you sew -- DO NOT watch the needle go up and down. Keep your eye on the edge of the fabric to be sure that it is against the foot (in the case of a quarter-inch foot) or against the post-it pad.

    4. Slow down. Going too slow is almost as bad, but there's no rush. Sew at a medium speed so you can have control of the fabric.

    5. Dont worry about crooked seams. As long as they are in the "general area" most of the time, once pressed -- it'll be OK.
    No q. police here.

  11. #61
    Super Member mhansen6's Avatar
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    I am so sorry you are having problems. I have a Pfaff Creative 4.0 and with the 1/4 foot it sews beautifully. I know having a machine that doesn't cooperate is frustrating.

  12. #62
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    gaigai

    Check to see if there are dust bunnies amongst your feed dogs. sometimes the least little bit of lint can cause that problem. I would also check the bobbin case for lint because it makes a big difference. Some fabrics such as flannel, and certain threads can create problems for the feed dogs and for the bobbin area. That could make the feed dogs act up. I have brothers and other brand machines that I use, and some are touchier than others.

    good Luck

    Suzy

  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suzy
    gaigai
    Check to see if there are dust bunnies amongst your feed dogs. sometimes the least little bit of lint can cause that problem. I would also check the bobbin case for lint because it makes a big difference. Some fabrics such as flannel, and certain threads can create problems for the feed dogs and for the bobbin area. That could make the feed dogs act up. I have brothers and other brand machines that I use, and some are touchier than others.Suzy

    Thanks, Suzy, I'll do that, but since the machine is BRAND new, and has been doing it from the beginning, I'm not hopeful. I now know just how spoiled I've been by Janome and Elna.

  14. #64
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gaigai
    Quote Originally Posted by Suzy
    gaigai
    Check to see if there are dust bunnies amongst your feed dogs. sometimes the least little bit of lint can cause that problem. I would also check the bobbin case for lint because it makes a big difference. Some fabrics such as flannel, and certain threads can create problems for the feed dogs and for the bobbin area. That could make the feed dogs act up. I have brothers and other brand machines that I use, and some are touchier than others.Suzy

    Thanks, Suzy, I'll do that, but since the machine is BRAND new, and has been doing it from the beginning, I'm not hopeful. I now know just how spoiled I've been by Janome and Elna.
    I love my Janome, but it is very sensitive to dust in the bobbin case and the feed dogs. Just vacuuming will clear the problem. But in the case of a new machine, it is probably something else.

  15. #65
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    i don't know why you think there's anything wrong with you.

    yours is a stubbornly free spirit, light years ahead of its time.

    straight-shmaight. it's all art, baybeeeee. ;-)

  16. #66
    Super Member patdesign's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gaigai
    Quote Originally Posted by mhansen6
    There are 1/4 inch feet that have a guide blade that works wonderfully. I think most manufacturers make them. I wouldn't be without it now. Sure makes sewing a straight line easier.
    Yeah, but I just bought a Brother, and the $15.00 foot is NOT 1/4 inch. It is more like 6/16ths's, a BIG difference. Plus, I have NEVER had a problem sewing a straight seam. This machine will NOT give me a straight seam. I've always been able to sew up to a pin, stop with needle down, pull the pin & then continue without any problems. On this machine, even if I stop with needle down, and don't continue until the needle is completely out, it will jog the fabric and give me a crooked seam. This is the SQ9000, which I bought until I could afford a better machine. But after this, I definitely will not even consider another Brother, no matter HOW top of the line. It is SO frustrating to see that ugly crooked line and have to go back and resew every freaking intersection. Arrgh!!
    Yes you really do have to look out for some of those quilting feet with the flanges which are thin, they flare at the bottom and then lo and behold it is not 1/4 inch as planned. I use a vintage gauge presser foot, hard to find but sometimes on ebay, the flange can be set exactly where you want it and is rigid enough to do the job. I paid about $40.00 for mine, but it is worth it. I would contact Brother customer service about the weird crooked line, it shouldn't happen and they may have a fix for it.

  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by patdesign
    Yes you really do have to look out for some of those quilting feet with the flanges which are thin, they flare at the bottom and then lo and behold it is not 1/4 inch as planned. I use a vintage gauge presser foot, hard to find but sometimes on ebay, the flange can be set exactly where you want it and is rigid enough to do the job. I paid about $40.00 for mine, but it is worth it. I would contact Brother customer service about the weird crooked line, it shouldn't happen and they may have a fix for it.
    Thanks Pat, I think I will call Brother and see what the deal is. My machine is under warranty, and I can return it until the end of December, but I really would like to use it. Now, tell me what to enter in the search engine on ebay for that foot. I tried to use my Janome foot, but it wouldn't fit. I'll try anything at this point!! Thanks!

  18. #68
    Senior Member QUILT4JOY's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ktbb
    staring at the needle or even at a foot close to the needle tends to result in crooked lines.....try marking the base of the machine a couple of inches ahead of your needle and use that as your guide for the edge of your fabric and see if it helps...If us use that as your primary check, you can spot check periodically to see that the edge of the fabric hear the needle is where you want it to be.

    Think of driving down the road and focusing on a spot just ahead of your hood...you end up (usually) over compensating and the car moves back and forth a lot, even tho it may be small moves. If you focus on the road several yards ahead of the car, your turns are less jerky, the ride is smoother, and the path of the car is a straighter line.
    My sister taught me this same thing years ago. Using the driving analogy she told me to do that when I was drawing a pencil line in art or cutting across fabric(no rotary cutters in those days) :lol:

  19. #69
    Super Member patdesign's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gaigai
    Quote Originally Posted by patdesign
    Yes you really do have to look out for some of those quilting feet with the flanges which are thin, they flare at the bottom and then lo and behold it is not 1/4 inch as planned. I use a vintage gauge presser foot, hard to find but sometimes on ebay, the flange can be set exactly where you want it and is rigid enough to do the job. I paid about $40.00 for mine, but it is worth it. I would contact Brother customer service about the weird crooked line, it shouldn't happen and they may have a fix for it.
    Thanks Pat, I think I will call Brother and see what the deal is. My machine is under warranty, and I can return it until the end of December, but I really would like to use it. Now, tell me what to enter in the search engine on ebay for that foot. I tried to use my Janome foot, but it wouldn't fit. I'll try anything at this point!! Thanks!
    Go to ebay and search for Gauge presser Foot. When looking at the foot you should see a strange looking foot and several little metal bars that insert at the back of the foot and they determine the settings you can use, they are marked with lines, from there it is a matter of measuring from the center of the needle to the inside of the little guide bar, set it for the seam allowance you want and it will stay there until you release it. Last week there was one on a buy it now for $129., which is a little too much, as they ususally will close between $40 (low) and mid $70's (high). Occasionally you will see one for a high shank, or for a slant shank as they were made by singer and sold for different versions of their machines. I would ask the question of the seller if not clear. Most common is the low shank foot, but you should measure the height of the shank on your brother (to screw) to make sure.

  20. #70
    Super Member patdesign's Avatar
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    I have a brother innovis 1250 which is a combo sewing and embroidery machine, it works great and I have been back to the dealer a couple of times with questions, and the back up on Brother on line is also VERY helpful. I use an old Singer 201 for piecing and quilting which is what I use my Gauge presser foot on, but my brother feet and the Singer ones are mostly interchangeable except that my Singer 201 is not a zig zag. I grew up sewing on a 201 and in my book, there is no more powerful machine until you go to industrial.

  21. #71
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    Do NOT look at the needle! It only goes up and down.
    I make a mark well in front of the needle to use as a guide for the edge of the fabric. Keep your eyes on that mark.
    This also works when making half square triangles...
    Good luck.
    By the way, I'm teaching my 9 yr. old neighbor how to sew and this tip helped her immensely!

  22. #72
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    Just read some of the other posts, and someone used almost the same words...."guide for the edge of the fabric". She looks like me too....lol!
    Didn't mean to plagiarize...just coincidence.

  23. #73
    Google Goddess craftybear's Avatar
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    thanks everyone for all of the tips

  24. #74
    Senior Member mtngrl's Avatar
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    I had this problem and was very frustrated with myself. THEN I bought a Brother sewing machine at Wal Mart for a travel machine and I was able to sew a straight line right away. I realized the feed dogs on my old machine were causing the problem by skewing the fabric to the left. The cost to repair was more than my machine was worth. I now have a new machine and all my seams are straight.
    "An essential aspect of creativity is not being afraid to fail." Edwin Land

    Blessings! Ruth

  25. #75
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    when we were working on a group quilt at our Guild, one of our more "senior" members (one who has won numerous awards by the way!!!) Worked with me to perfect my 1/4" --- turns out, a big part of the problem is a wobbly machine foot!!! I love that particular machine, but the bottom of the foot has too much "play" in it... changed to a "Litte Foot" and my problem was solved! I still use the painters tape trick, but my 1/4" is so much more accurate (Not perfect yet, but at least straight lol)

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